Employees value students’ work experience activities

first_imgEmployees value students’ work experience activitiesOn 18 Apr 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Graduates with solid workexperience are more employable than those who have taken gap years or donevoluntary work, a survey of the country’s leading blue-chip recruiters hasrevealed.Work experience, as partof a degree course, came top in a list of 10 activities employers look for fromgraduate candidates. Part-time or temporary work, and training in key ITskills, also scored highly. Gap years and voluntary work are the least valued.The survey, which wascarried out by the Financial Times and the Association of Graduate Recruiters,asked 90 recruiters in leading blue-chip companies to rate which activitiesenhance graduate employability. Respondents were asked to scale activities fromone to four, where one indicates a great deal of importance is attached to theactivity.A structured workexperience placement as part of a degree scored 1.74 on average, and any formof work experience scored 1.93 on average. Voluntary work scored only 2.77 onthe scale.Carl Gilleard, chiefexecutive of the Association of Graduate Recruiters, called for better bridgesto be built between employers and universities.He said, “Thesurvey shows employers need to provide high quality work experience, but itmust be structured to allow graduates to reflect on their experience properly.At the end of the day, employers will benefit.”www.agr.org.uk Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Commission still can’t quite put minds at rest

first_img Previous Article Next Article Ever since the draft code on data protection appeared last October, HRmanagers and employers have been up in arms about the draconian rules they faceand the difficulty of making much sense of the code’s 200 standards. Last week,the Information Commission convened a special conference to reassure us all.Fat chance. On the plus side, the commission has agreed to simplify the code, getexperts in to write the final draft and let important bodies, including theCIPD, look it over. This will at least make it clearer how the contradictionsbetween last year’s RIP regulations, which appear to authorise e-mail andInternet monitoring, fit in with the guidance in the code. The revised codewill also make it easier to distinguish between what the commission thinkswould be nice for employers to do and what firms must do to avoid breaching theData Protection Act. But the key worries for employers haven’t been resolved. Although DavidSmith, the Assistant Information Commissioner, acknowledged that the originalversion didn’t take on board the risks for employers, he did not suggest therewould be any changes of substance in the revised code. And the lucky people whohave to implement it are, you guessed it, the HR profession. Data protection is a complex area covering the legal requirements of theemployment contract and the Human Rights Act, as well as direct data protectionlaw. It is not the commission’s job to find a middle ground between employersand staff, but simply to interpret the law. At the conference, a learned lawyer compared data protection law at work toa game of snakes and ladders. As another speaker pointed out, at this rate itcould be more like playing Russian roulette. Noel O’Reilly, Editor Comments are closed. Commission still can’t quite put minds at restOn 3 Jul 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Tax-break shares plan backed by listed firms

first_imgTax-break shares plan backed by listed firmsOn 7 Aug 2001 in Personnel Today Two-thirds of FTSE 350 companies are considering adopting a Government planto encourage employee share ownership. A survey by consultancy New Bridge Street shows that 66 per cent of the 100companies that responded may take on the All-employee Share Ownership Plan(Aesop), which could give staff significant tax breaks. The plan allows employers to allocate free shares to employees, offer thempartnership shares out of pre-tax pay and match the employee’s investment bythe allocation of up to two extra matching shares for each partnership sharepurchased. The study reveals that 44 per cent of employers thinking of operating theAesop intend to offer staff the chance to buy partnership shares and 32 percent intend to offer free shares. The tax break applies only if the shares are held for five years. Tim Craddock, head of employment law and recruitment at Air Miles, whosestaff can join British Airways’ save-as-you-earn share scheme, said, “Theygive staff a stake in the company. They can feel they own a bit of the companyand are making a contribution to their own welfare beyond receiving asalary.” John Lee, a partner with New Bridge Street, who called for the Government toreduce the length of time before shares can be taken from five to three years,said, “Its introduction alongside existing share schemes is a step forwardin the evolution of employee share ownership.” By Ben Willmott Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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My mentor

first_img Comments are closed. My mentorOn 21 Aug 2001 in Personnel Today Bruce Robertson, head of HR at Pret a Manger, on the qualities that makeKathryn Matz, who owns an HR consultancy, his career confidante since theirtime together at HarrodsBruce Robertson’s career leapt forward when his mentor presented him with thesort of opportunity that not even a fool would turn down. At the tender age of 25, he found himself promoted to head of HR forHarrods, responsible for 6,000 employees and a team of 18 HR managers andofficers. Now head of HR for Pret à Manger, Robertson met Kathryn Matz when they bothworked at Harrods. He was personnel manager of the Harrods fashion directoratewhile Matz, who now owns a management consultancy in San Francisco, was HRdirector. Robertson describes Matz as tenacious with a tough management style.”She’s never been afraid to challenge things or to change things,” hesays. They share the same drive, says Roberston, but he wishes his memory wasmore like hers. “Kathryn never forgets a thing and has an amazing workingmemory.” Robertson admires Matz’s ability to link everything HR does to business. Shetaught him that if the profession is to be accepted by the business, then ithas to prove its influence and be able to offer serious arguments behind anydesires for change. But his most significant lesson was learning not to be knocked back by ageprejudices, which he encountered when he was promoted. Matz left four years ago to return to the US, but they are still in touch.Robertson still bounces ideas off her, but jokes that he hopes that these daysit is more of a two-way process. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Ethical cleansing

first_img Comments are closed. Corporate social responsibility is rising up the business agenda, but firmshave been slow to use HR to deliver sound corporate values. But in anincreasingly socially and environmentally aware world, how can personnelprofessionals help companies to promote ethical behaviour to maximise theirglobal brands? Stephen Overell reportsThe Prince of Wales International Business Leaders Forum has agrand-sounding mission. “Our vision of CSR [Corporate SocialResponsibility] is open and transparent business practices that are based onethical values and respect for employees, communities and theenvironment”. Set up by the Prince of Wales and several concerned chief executives in1990, the London-based forum promotes ethical behaviour among companies andencourages thought for the economies and communities in which they operate.”Membership of the IBLF is a practical demonstration of a company’scommitment to pursuing responsible business practices,” its websiteproclaims Yet some of the members of this network of 65 of the world’s most powerfulcompanies might raise a few eyebrows. There is GlaxoSmithKline, which led 39pharmaceuticals companies in a three-year battle against the South Africangovernment in a bid to protect the prices it charged for anti-retroviral drugsused in the treatment of Aids, a disease threatening to affect 20 per cent ofthe South African population. In a settlement, earlier this year, thepharmaceutical industry was widely held to have lost. Then there is BMW. In 1999, the German prestige car manufacturer took upTony Blair’s offer of a £140m tax break to keep open a facility for Rover atLongbridge, in the Midlands. Eighteen months later it pulled out, selling theloss-making Rover – known internally as “the English patient” – fornext to nothing. The network also boasts Chevron, the US energy giant. In 1998, the companyadmitted it had transported Nigerian military and police, who shot and killedcommunity activists protesting at the Parabe oil rig in the Niger Delta. Then there are Rio Tinto, Shell, Enron and Coca-Cola, all busy trying topatch up their reputations after long periods of dominance on global humanrights and environmental charge-sheets. Critics of the way business claims one thing and does another in the fieldof social responsibility do not have to look hard to find instances of, atbest, rather liberal interpretations of espoused principles and, at worst,downright hypocrisy among the IBLF’s membership. Conveniently, the airy phrase”socially responsible business practices” can mean anything andnothing. But Aidan Davy, director of corporate services at the IBLF, says it is notthe purpose of the network to represent its members to the world, nor policetheir actions. It is rather to help them fulfil a genuine commitment tocontinuous ethical improvement. “We enjoy a healthy working relationshipwith our members and can be constructively critical in private,” he says.”The motivations that drive companies to move towards socialresponsibility often involve difficult experiences. We are not an exclusiveclub for lily-white companies with bulletproof reputations. At any one timedozens of our members will be actively campaigned against, but it does have tobe stated that often the reporting of these things can be woefullyone-sided.” The IBLF does not have sanctions against its membership, nor has anyone everbeen evicted. But there is periodic re-evaluation of the group’s seriousnessabout ethics. “We don’t look to measure their commitment in a forensicway. Quite often you get to see a kind of internal graduation in commitment.Reputation is often an entry point for becoming interested in socialresponsibility, but over a period of months you get to see a transformation aspeople come to understand the case better.” This point is symptomatic of the subjectivity that blights much of thedebate surrounding CSR and business ethics. There is no simple definition ofwhat socially responsible behaviour is and, as a consequence, companies canhave immense difficulty with the issue. A company which boasts or shouts aboutits position on various issues can find itself hoist on its own petard in otherareas of its business; equally, and frustratingly, it can find its commitmentseen as nothing more than a cheap marketing gimmick. Yet a company that isquiet about its charity work can miss out on the favourable gloss a reputationfor good corporate citizenship can bestow on a brand. Further, one company maybelieve behaving ethically simply means obeying the law in any given country.Others will argue that a reputation for social responsibility necessitatesgoing beyond the letter of the law to take up a pioneering stance that peoplewould not expect from commercial organisations, as traditionally conceived. As an illustration of the complexity, consider the case of shoe retailerClarks. The company began as a Quaker cobbler in Somerset in 1825, and today isone of the few remaining firms keeping the Quaker conscience alive, with Clarkfamily representatives on the board, still asking awkward questions aboutprogressive employment practices, health and safety and employee share ownership.Chief executive Roger Pedder says, “There is a durability in the Quakercompany based on its attitude to business. Quakerism is a moderator ofbehaviour – the desire to be consensual, to work out a durable solution to aproposition, gives it a sort of serenity. There is no get-rich-quick mentality.The Quakers say they are stewards of wealth. But some might say there is atension between social responsibility and doing what is economically andcommercially right.” Shoe-making, however, is not the easiest arena in which to stitch a socialconscience. It is no longer productive to manufacture volume shoes in Britainand, as a result, Clarks is no longer a shoe-making business at all, but aretailer and wholesaler owning or franchising shops and importing shoes. Sixyears ago, 75 per cent of shoes were made in Clarks factories. Now it is lessthan 25 per cent, with 40 per cent of the business based overseas. Yet thefigures tell a tale of the traditional Quaker distaste for redundancy – in 12years the company has shut down two-thirds of UK manufacturing while reducingemployees by less than 10 per cent (18,000 down to 16,500). “The dynamics of the marketplace has been that shoe-makers migrated tothe lowest cost of dexterous, manual labour – Germany, for instance, has noindigenous shoe-manufacturing,” says Pedder. “It took us a long timeto face up to the fact that manufacturing shoes was not a viable activity here.But Quakers are practical people and we said ‘where is the greater good?’ Abuoyant Clarks is better than a limping Clarks.” Two years ago concern arose about exploitation of workers at a Taiwanesesupplier. So a delegation, made up of senior managers, went to investigate.They came back with their minds at rest. “You might not like the longhours, the segregation or the dragooning, but it was hard to argue over thecleanliness and high standards – there was a sports complex, leisurefacilities, a lover’s nook. Given that society, we were satisfied in our ownminds that the pay was good.” In situations involving overseas suppliers there is always a balanceddecision to be made about labour standards. HR people who investigate may becertain that within the context of a particular labour market, standards andquality are impressive. But as comedian Mark Thomas has enjoyed asking severalsquirming executives, “Would you like it if your daughter workedthere?” Such subjectivity has helped to confuse attempts to nail down a definitionof CSR. The Industrial Society’s version reads, “Corporate socialresponsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically andcontribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of theworkforce and their families as well as the local community and society atlarge.” Nigel Tuffrey, director of the Corporate Citizenship Company, a Londonconsultancy, argues there will never be an agreement about what asocially-responsible company has to do. “The different interest groups have their own views. There is no tabletof stone. It is still the most fluid of debates. Governments are having theirsay as well as the multiplicity of pressure groups. An individual company hasto find its own way. It will have a mission and a set of values, but how itlives out its values in practical way, that is a matter of debate. The prioritymay be different in each workplace.” Yet the fluidity of the concept has done little to stop CSR dramaticallyrising up the business agenda. Some 58 per cent of FTSE 100 companies report onsocial or community issues, while three-quarters of occupational pension fundholders want pension funds to exercise their influence on companies to furthersocially responsible aims. Behaviour standards and codes of conductproliferate. In addition, the stakeholder debate has transformed attitudes tocorporate governance. In 1998, a study of the chief executives of the”world’s most respected companies” tried to ascertain the attributesthat would guarantee respect in the future. The chief executives placed”strong and consistent profit performance” only fractionally ahead of”robust and human corporate culture”. The Institute of Directorsidentified “honesty and integrity” as the most vital personalcharacteristic for appointments to a board in its Sign of the Times report. The initial view of many businesses that incorporating stakeholders and CSRinto the traditional objectives of a business might “confuse”agendas, has made way for a growing feeling that a strong policy on CSR canprovide tangible shareholder benefits. In 1999, the IoD’s Ethics in Businesssurvey identified that many boards are giving priority to stakeholderinterests. The survey found very mixed views about the statement, “We seeshareholders’ interest as our first priority”. Although 42 per cent agreedto some degree, 27 per cent disagreed completely. Meanwhile, well over 85 percent agreed with the statement, “We try to devise policies which takeaccount of all stakeholders.” However, few directors feel compelled to take a more diverse range ofinterest groups into account when making business decisions. This was also theview of the UK Committee on Corporate Governance, chaired by Sir Ronald Hampel.The committee’s report concluded, “To redefine the directors’responsibilities in terms of the stakeholders would mean identifying all thevarious stakeholder groups; and deciding the nature and extent of thedirectors’ responsibility to each. The result would be that the directors wouldnot be effectively accountable to anyone, since there would be no clear yardstickfor judging their performance. This is a recipe neither for good governance norfor corporate success.” That may be so. But the costs of ignoring a perceived demand for action onCSR could be heavy. Brands account for 25 per cent of the world’s financialwealth, according to consultancy Interbrand. This was the motivation thatprompted the Body Shop to stop using PVC in products, packaging and shop-fits. Body Shop’s brand is known for pioneering corporate concern for theenvironment – “Our concern about the social and environmental implicationsassociated with PVC overrides any decision to use it,” Nicky Amos, head ofbusiness ethics, says. The view that CSR is essential to protect vulnerable global brands iswidespread. Events at Davos, Seattle and Genoa have brought home to politiciansand business leaders alike just how unpopular globalisation is among certainsections of society. Strategy guru Michael Porter said in a recent speech atLondon Business School, “In a more socially and environmentally awareworld, corporate responsibility in these spheres will itself be a source ofcompetitive advantage.” But yet again, it is complicated – many brands intobacco and oil production seem to have weathered a sustained assault from NGOswith little apparent damage to profitability; Erin Brokovich has not finishedoff Pacific Gas and Electric. There is a substantial body of evidence to suggest ethical considerationsaffect people’s choice of employer and brands – although such surveys arenotoriously fickle. According to the Industrial Society, 82 per cent ofprofessionals would not work for an organisation whose values they did notbelieve in. Over half chose their employer because they believe in what itdoes, and almost everyone – 99 per cent – cares if their organisation actsresponsibly. Among small businesses, 62 per cent said employees were most likely toencourage them to be socially active, while 61 per cent said they would be mostinfluenced by the law. The society argues that such findings challenge theprevailing wisdom that bases recruitment and retention strategies on pay andbenefits. Its report, Corporate Nirvana – Is the Future Socially Responsible? states,”The potential for near full employment in the UK, combined with increasedcompetition and the need to cut costs, is putting pressure on companies tobecome ’employers of choice’. Of course pay and development will continue totake precedence in people’s choice of work – especially for people earlier onin their careers – however, the job seeker’s market means that these can oftenbe taken as a given and other priorities such as ethics and reputation play amore important role.” A study published in July by US consultancy Hill and Knowlton found that 79per cent of Americans take a company’s attitude to corporate citizenship intoaccount when buying a product. A clear majority would also buy the stock ofsocially responsible companies, even though accepting lower financial returns. Yet few people actually see US companies as ethical organisations. Less than2 per cent of respondents perceive US firms to be good corporate citizens. Theysee participation in charitable activity as being motivated by a desire forgood publicity. Fewer than 25 per cent believe companies donate time and moneyto charitable causes because they are truly committed. The question of motivation is an interesting one. Does the reason they do itmatter if more companies adopt socially responsible business practices? MichaelLittlechild, chief executive of GoodCorporation, an organisation which operatesa badge of social responsibility for companies, thinks not. “It is theresult that is important. A number of organisations come into this area becauseof a strong personal commitment, but there is no doubt reputation is a lot ofit. The point is that they should do it seriously.” But Littlechild argues that ultimately ethical behaviour is of directinterest to businesses. “More companies understand that not following theshort-term path to success can be in their interest. Most people believe thatbeing ethical is a long-term position and will greatly help the value of acompany’s brand,” he says. “Therefore it is a good commercialdecision. You may not be taking a decision that is without specific cost, butin the long term, good community and customer relations are extremelyvaluable.” Simon Webley, research director of the Institute of Business Ethics, says,”The current driver of this issue is fear. But the negative drivers areoften seen as having a positive effect. Firms with stated policies on CSR saythat people enjoy working for a company that has specific standards. You will,however, get a more sustained commitment if it comes from the leadership of acompany that feels it is an important part of any business.” Article 13 is a London-based social responsibility consultancy (slogan:”turning obligation into opportunity”) which claims that ethicalissues can be turned into advantages for companies enabling them todifferentiate themselves from rivals and build a strong brand. Theconsultancy’s strategy involves a combination of detailed knowledge across awide range of policy areas – ultra-low sulphur petrol, Working TimeRegulations, integrated product policy, age-discrimination and stakeholderpensions, for example, and turning these obligations into “good news”for companies. Labels and brands can be linked to strong social feeling oncertain issues; attitudes of sales staff on social and ethical policy can be animportant source of differentiation from competitors; clients can make”green claims” and so build a reputation. But co-director Jane Fiona Cumming says that if companies are alerted to theissue of CSR for reasons of reputation they cannot be perceived to adopt aprogramme in a half-hearted way. “If people embark on a programme that is all froth and no substance,they will be found out,” she warns. “We would prefer people to wantto do it because they believe in it. But different people come to this issuefor different reasons and their attitudes can change as they do it. They cantreat it as a compliance issue, or take a positive attitude and go forsomething innovate that can unlock a competitive edge.” Corporate attitudes to CSR are inevitably much conditioned by, and perhapseven inspired by, the media. It will be the media that sets the standard forwhat is expected of companies on CSR – and polices its impact. Yet analysis ofhow the media reports on the issue paints a complicated picture. Communicationsresearch group Echo examined 430 articles on CSR published around the world in2000. It found that organisations which operate across several markets attractthe most recognition for best practice in the CSR arena and see it as a licenceto operate in a competitive world. Yet there are distinct differences in theway different countries approach CSR. In the US there is a long tradition ofphilanthropy. In Japan, CSR is seen as an extension of a lifelongresponsibility for employees. The key benefits of CSR for companies are employee motivation and retention,improved reputation and – through dialogue and engagement with theirstakeholders – better issue management. However, the risk of not being seen totackle the question of CSR also emerged strongly. International anti-capitalistdemonstrations, the use of the Internet as a propaganda tool and a mediaever-hungry for transgressions underlined the point. Echo’s report warns companies not to use CSR as a sticking plaster fordeeper underlying problems. It also advises firms not to raise unrealisticexpectations of delivery – causing risks for shareholders as well as damagingpublic perception of the company. There are risks, too, in companies notbehaving “all of a piece” – exhibiting socially responsible conductin one market, but not in another, such as in the developing world. Noticeably, short-term interests often seemed to be at odds with longer-termplans for CSR programmes. But the report is cautious about the link betweenethical conduct and commercial benefit. “There remains a task ofquantifying the benefits, so that ethical balance becomes a measure ofcorporate performance,” the report says. And Nigel Middlemiss, practicedirector at Echo concludes, “The best ones don’t always bang the drum.Boasting about CSR may not always be the answer. You have to go about things ina discreet way.” The rising profile of CSR looks unlikely to diminish, if, for no otherreason than the media. Given its slippery nature, however, HR professionals canperhaps be thankful that although good employee relations is fundamental toCSR, HR is only rarely given overall responsibility for it. According to theIBE, just 10 per cent of companies known to have codes deliver CSR through theHR function. Yet David Grayson, director of Business in the Community, arguesthat this does not mean HR is not “very important”. “One of therising issues on the CSR agenda is work-life balance. Employee stress,diversity and employee well-being are absolutely critical – they are at theheart of running a sustainable business.” Grayson warns there is a risk in turning firms away from CSR by”over-complicating” it. At its heart lies a simple matter, he says,”What we are talking about is the impact a business has on society and howto maximise its positive impact and minimise its negative impact.” Worldwide ‘badge’ for standardsGoodCorporation launched in June this year, aiming to be “a globalbadge” for corporate responsibility. At its heart is a 21-point chartercovering fairness to employees, suppliers, shareholders, protection of theenvironment and contribution to the community. It sets itself apart from otherstandards by covering all stakeholders and all companies – small businesses canbecome a GoodCorporation as well as huge multinationals, though the costs ofindependent verification will mean fees range from about £1,000 up to tens ofthousands for big companies. In particular, the initiative is targeted at beinga “screen” for suppliers – reducing reputational risk in the supplychain.To become a member, organisations have to submit to an audit, which involvestalking to employees and suppliers as well as inspecting documentary andcontractual evidence.On treatment of employees, the charter has eight points: – Provide clear and fair terms of employment– Provide clean, healthy and safe working conditions– Have a fair remuneration policy – Strive for equal opportunities for all present and potential employees– Encourage employees to develop skills and progress in their careers– Do not tolerate any sexual, physical or mental harassment of employees– Do not discriminate on grounds of colour, ethnic origin, gender, age,religion, political or other opinion, disability or sexual orientation– Do not employ under-age staffAs some of these seem vague, or relatively easy to attain, accompanyingmaterial details each clause. On the first point, for instance, about fairterms of employment, auditors will examine that a termination policy is explicit,that there is a documented disciplinary procedure and that an employer candemonstrate that freedom of association and organisation of employees isrespected.On pay policy, pay differentials and executive remuneration are not part ofthe audit. Companies do not even have to pay above the “norm” or paypremium rates of overtime. “In determining remuneration, a comparison oflocal cost of living and pay norms has been made and taken intoconsideration”, the evidence requirement says.Stuart Gregory, of Bureau Veritas Quality International, one of the auditingagencies used by GoodCorporation, says the standard is a “half-wayhouse” leading companies in the right direction on CSR. “Goodcorp isa step towards taking companies in the right direction,” he says. “Itis giving the right message and relatively easy to achieve. It is a veryrounded approach. But it is deliberately less stringent than other codes inthis area such as the Ethical Trading Initiative Base Code, for instance, orthe Sainsbury’s Principles on Responsible Trading or the SA 8000standard.”Gregory says that while most CSR codes don’t require evidence of writtensystems, documents are a useful guide to how thorough an approach is. “Itis not just the words on the paper but the spirit behind it that isimportant.”Typically, an audit, which could last from one day up to several weeks,depending on the size of a company, will talk to management first. Then, tradeunions if they exist, and if they don’t as many employees as possible – preferablyoff management territory. Auditors will also talk with contractors over thephone, although Gregory says “it is often difficult to get a balancedview”.ARM Holdings was one of the first 10 organisations to be awarded theGoodCorporation badge. The company designs microprocessors for mobile phones,personal computers and hand-held computer games, and licenses its intellectualproperty. It does not manufacture anything itself.Its chief financial officer, Jonathan Brooks, says his company started totake an interest in CSR because of pressure from institutional investors andanalysts. He decided to submit to the verification involved in becoming aGoodCorporation because he saw it as a way of clarifying what was necessary inCSR.”If I didn’t have this tool, I’d be asking, ‘How far do I have to go?How much time should I invest?’ We don’t believe in written policies andprocedures for the sake of it. But we do need to reflect our values in allaspects of our work, and as we have grown this has required the adoption offormal policies,” he says.In 2000, ARM approached the Institute of Business Ethics, looking for amodel. After joining the IBE, it undertook to become a GoodCorporation. It madea social, ethical and environmental disclosure in its 2000-2001 annual report.KPMG and the Swiss inspection group Societe Generale de Surveillance carriedout the three-week audit at three ARM sites in Cambridge, UK, Austin, Texas,and Tokyo. Auditors examined employment contracts and policies, checked the timeit took the company to pay suppliers, talked to customer support staff aboutcomplaints procedures and looked at donations to charity and communityactivity.Many of the aims were already in operation – not employing under-age staff,for instance. But the fact that the audit is repeated annually has given thecompany an impetus to improve, says Brooks. Targets are now in place forrecycling and energy consumption.Seaview Hotel and Restaurant on the Isle of White was also among the firstGoodCorporations. Nicky Hayward, the owner, says the hotel, which has only 40staff, had been practising “corporate commitment and ethics” for thepast 20 years, but “did not want to become complacent”.As well as sourcing locally, Seaview has weekly staff ideas meetings,encourages responsiveness to customer feedback and recycles waste as far aspossible – including giving away old beds.Hayward claims a commitment to CSR has brought tangible business benefits.Staff turnover is 14 per cent (against some hotels, which live with 50 percent) and occupancy averages 82 per cent.Verification through self-certificationAlthough some initiatives stress the importance of third-party verification,other codes and standards are based solely on written documents andself-certification.The FTSE4Good Index, introduced in July, bases its decisions on annualreports, websites and information provided in response to a questionnaire fromthe Ethical Investment Research Service, a charity aiming to help organisationswith ethical investment decisions. The index looks at three areas: the environment, human rights and socialissues, such as stakeholder relationsOn its launch, of 757 companies in the FTSE all-share index, two-thirds wereexcluded, including Tesco, Safeway and the Royal Bank of Scotland – due to lackof information as much as evidence of poor ethics. Companies involved intobacco, weapons and nuclear power were excluded automatically.An example from the criteria dealing with management systems on equalopportunities, says companies need to “provide evidence of equalopportunities systems including one or more of”:– Monitoring of the policy and workforce composition– Flexible work arrangements and family benefits (at least three of flexiblework time, child care support, job sharing, career breaks, or maternity orpaternity pay beyond the legal requirements)– More than 10 per cent of managers being women or the proportion ofmanagers who are women or from ethnic minorities exceeding two-fifths of theirrepresentation in the workforce concerned, or– Assigning responsibility for equal opportunities policy to a seniormanager.A separate system that relies on self-certification is the proposal fromUS-based Ethics Officer Association, representing 400 multinationals, for anInternational Standards Organisation award for global business conduct.The standard would require organisations to draw up a policy for businessconduct, implement it, assess how well it is working, make improvements andkeep it under review.According to Edward Petry, executive director of the EOA, the lack ofmandatory certification will not please all stakeholder groups, but he argues,”We are hoping it will avoid some of the more costly regulations thatmight come – and some of the cost and burden of other standards being proposed.Many of our members feel they have years of experience in auditing andassessing their own programmes and they can do that much better than most ofthe third-party certifiers.”Case study: BP‘CSR is motivational. It is a licence to operate’At BP, corporate social responsibility is not perceived as an issue to begiven to any one department or function – there is no one executive “incharge” of it. Instead, it is treated as the by-product of policy coveringall activities.The company has five policy areas: ethical conduct; health, safety and environment;employees; external relationships; and finance and control. On each of thesethe company makes a number of commitments and statements of expectation.For example, on employees, the BP website sets out policies on issues suchas work-life balance, diversity and the number of training days each worker canexpect (five) as well as what it calls the “key people measures” ofappraisal, upward feedback, 360-degree feedback, vacancies advertised anddevelopment conversations. Its section on employee consultation begins,”We recognise, consistent with local legislation, the right of everyemployee to form or join a trade union.”David Rice, BP director of the policy unit, says, “CSR comes out ofwhat we do. Policies drive the way we behave”.The centre sets out the policy and framework and how it is to be deliveredvia a devolved business model. Issues are either covered by performancecontracts between the business units and the centre, or through peer processeswhere groups of businesses share an issue or a specific challenge.Verification is carried out through a system of business unit leadersself-certifying what they have achieved, while there is also an internal auditscheme. “We regard CSR as a licence to operate. It is motivational – especiallyamong younger employees who do care a lot about these issues. But it is also anopportunity. Managing down our carbon dioxide emissions has made us money.”But ethics have never been clear-cut. The whole area is one ofjudgement. We tell people to try and avoid making decisions on their own. Thereis always someone who can point out something we were doing wrong.”Classical ethics:Bluff your way Systematic study of ethics, and the examination of human values, conduct andgoodness, began with Socrates in the fifth century.His pupil, Plato, in his Theory of Forms, thought that objective standardsof justice and goodness existed beyond the everyday world. Aristotle, bycontrast, argued that virtue is natural and so leads to happiness; moralvirtues are acquired by practice, like skills. “When devoid of virtue, man is the most unscrupulous and savage ofanimals and the worst in regard to sexual indulgence and gluttony,” hewrote in his Politics.The Cyrenaics and Epicureans were hedonists who believed in the wise pursuitof pleasure. The Stoics advocated control of the passions and indifference to pleasureand pain.Resources:Websiteswww.ibe.org.ukwww.ftse4good.comwww.goodcorporation.comwww.bp.comwww.pwblf.orgThe Prince of Wales International Business Leaders Forum: 0207 467 3600 Books: Business Ethics: Facing up to the issues, edited by Chris Moon andClive Bonny, Economist Business Books, 2001, £20 Ethical cleansingOn 4 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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War for talent hots up

first_img Comments are closed. In a time of economic uncertainty, companies are discovering the battle torecruit and retain key performers is well and truly on. Resources are beingdirected towards employees who have a proven track record of adding value tothe business, as Liz Simpson discoversStability, security and work that offers a high degree of meaning andpurpose are the factors driving recruitment and retention in North America inthe wake of the dotcom bust, the tragic events of 11 September and thewidespread economic recession. Labour shortages still exist across many industries and geographical areas,so it’s not totally a buyers’ market. Many organisations and small businessesare desperate to attract well-qualified and experienced individuals who can hitthe ground running – particularly in high tech, healthcare and the buildingtrades. Healthcare organisations around the US have been offering sign-on bonusesfor nearly every professional category from registered nurses to physicaltherapists, says Karen Hart, senior vice-president of the Healthcare Divisionof recruitment consultancy Bernard Hodes Group. However, she adds, salariesremain static. In other industries, companies are directing their resources towardsindividuals who have a proven record of adding demonstrable value to thebusiness. “Companies are attracting and retaining top talent by acting onthese individuals’ needs, concerns and issues,” says John Challenger, CEOof international outplacement firm Gray Challenger & Christmas, based in Chicago.”For example, this may involve making sure a child’s special educationneeds or health problems are well managed, or agreeing that a new recruit cantake a sabbatical after two years. Special employees are having benefitsprograms tailored uniquely for them. And companies need to be constantlyvigilant and proactive on this issue to ensure staff don’t becomecomplacent.” Incentives have shifted from the tangible to the intangible, according toBruce Skillings, executive vice-president in the Palo Alto, California officesof Bernard Hodes. “The biggest inducements are vision, values, culture and communicationstrategy,” adds Skillings. “Employees no longer want three jobs everyfour years. They are attracted to stable companies, particularly big brandnames, where the goals, direction and communication style of the organisationoffers the right ‘fit’ for them. Even people still attracted to start-ups wantto see a realistic business model, because today the biggest lure for toptalent is the opportunity to add value and produce real, tangibleresults.” The emphasis on security and a sense of meaning and purpose at work is borneout by the sudden appeal of public sector jobs. For example, the Public ServiceCommission in Canada, responsible for Federal Government recruitment, recentlyreported getting 22,300 applications for 890 jobs – whereas it received just16,000 applications during the whole of the previous year. Pam Walsh is Franklin Covey’s vice-president of talent development. She isbased in Salt Lake City, Utah and oversees the recruitment and retention ofsome 3,500 employees that help the company sell, promote and teach personal andorganisational effectiveness products and training around the world. “We are market competitive on salaries, but the reason people areattracted to working here is the opportunity to help change people’s lives withwhat we do. They stay because of the culture, which we maintain by onlyrecruiting people who contribute to our corporate qualities of camaraderie,warmth, integrity and a deep respect for what we are trying to achieve,”says Walsh. “Ensuring the right cultural fit and offering opportunitiesfor personal and professional growth helps us retain good people,” sheadds. Of course, it’s possible to lose your star performers not only to thecompetition, but also to the desire to strike out on their own asentrepreneurs. A recent study of the investment banking community, carried outby Harvard Business School associate professor Ashish Nanda and doctoralstudents, M Julia Prats and Boris Groysberg, focused on this. The reasons these high performing knowledge workers leave to becomeentrepreneurs offer important insights for anyone anxious to retain theintellectual capital of star employees. “We found turnover is highest whenthe company is under-performing compared with other firms in the industry, andalso if a person’s own department does not comprise of ‘A team’ members,”says Nanda. “One of the best retention strategies is to make sure teams comprisebright, intelligent, creative people who are given the level of autonomy thatsatisfies their entrepreneurial tendencies. “Winning the war for talent involves creating an environment that notonly offers high compensation and the opportunity to develop portable skills,but is organised in such a way that your stars feel they’re in thedecision-making loop on issues affecting their work.” M Julia Prats, whose particular focus is on the e-consulting industry, addsthat many founders of companies such as these left big consulting firms becausethey were frustrated by bureaucracy and their inability to implement new ideaswithin those established organisations. While their research study of investment banks ranged from 1988 to 1996, theauthors emphasise that it ended before the dotcom era and covers both boom andbust phases. “Undoubtedly, entrepreneurial turnover has declined dramatically due tothe state of the economy,” says Nanda. “However, it is short-sightedto be less careful about losing good people in bad times,” Nanda adds,”because when the economy picks up those that have left are definitely notgoing to come back.” Further informationwww.towersperrin.comwww.kpmg.comwww.deloittetouche.comwww.watsonwyatt.comwww.pwcglobal.comwww.wmmercer.com Previous Article Next Article War for talent hots upOn 1 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Metamorphosis at the Met

first_imgMetamorphosis at the MetOn 5 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Inhis new role as HR director for the Metropolitan Police, Martin Tiplady tellsRoss Wigham about the challenges he faces in strengthening HR so it canimplement the cultural changes proposed by the Police Reform BillMartin Tiplady, new HR director of the Metropolitan Police, has just steppedinto one of the most challenging jobs in the country at a time when the forceis undergoing a huge culture change. He is under no illusions about the size of the task facing him, as the forceprepares to go through a radical programme of modernisation set out in therecently published Police Reform Bill. The Bill outlines plans to change police pay and conditions, raise standardsand introduce new civilian community officers. “Modernising is a key challenge to HR in the Met. The Police ReformBill presents us with a range of issues, such as employing a new type of force;the use of auxiliaries; and pay and conditions,” he said. Tiplady was attracted to the job exactly because of the scale of thechallenge, which he told Personnel Today will include cutting red tape andtransforming the HR operation. “I really want to make this an HR department that is supporting andassisting the organisation develop. It has to be more about helping to relievethe management function and providing a set of tools they can use,” hesaid. “Around HR there is a lot of bureaucracy and form filling and, frankly,we have got to get rid of some of that. “The biggest challenge is bringing about structural, people and systemschange – it’s a classic personnel to HR transformation.” Importantly, Tiplady has the backing from inside the force to make changehappen. “There’s a strong view at the very top that HR is crucial to thisorganisation. You don’t get that as much in a commercial organisation and Idon’t have to fight to be heard,” he said. The reform Bill will help HR modernise the Met by setting out clear standardrequirements, explained Tiplady. “The police reform will help HR by creating a clear set of standardsyou can benchmark against and deliver.” A key goal for the Met is to become an employer of choice. The force hopesto introduce more flexible work arrangements and increase benefits. Free traintravel for staff within a 70-mile radius is already starting to helprecruitment, he added. “The Met has made it clear it wants to find more ways in which it canbe flexible about work patterns. We have some scope to accommodate that at themoment, and the police reform will encourage more flexible ways of working aswell as a work-life balance,” said Tiplady. “In the Met there is a desire to be as innovative and flexible aspossible in the way people work. We have 38,000 employees and we’ve got theability to bring about some real culture change, creating choices forpeople.” The Met is also developing more innovative recruitment methods to increasediversity, such as visiting Bollywood cinemas and sponsoring the Chinese NewYear. Tiplady said: “It’s now about keeping the momentum going. We havetargets and we have to make sure we get it right with a well-balancedintake.” Staff retention is also high on the HR agenda. Tiplady is looking to keepolder officers in the Met beyond the current 30-year cut-off point. “The reforms may enable us to find a way of retaining people after 30 yearsof service and for them to keep their pension benefits. There is a provision totest ‘the retention after 30 years’ scheme and we are in talks with the HomeOffice about being used as a pilot. “The ability to retain experienced officers alongside the intakes we’reexperiencing would have considerable benefits.” The Met is also backing the idea of strengthening the force with theintroduction of community wardens who will be given some police powers to helpreduce the burden on full-time officers. “We want to develop a scheme where you employ a new type of policefamily which has a limited police function. We are working through what thismight be in terms of training, and whether these roles would be paid ornot,” said Tiplady. “We also need to look at how we can link up with other agencies whoemploy people with responsibility for caretaking or security.” The police reform Bill is also looking to cut the high levels of sicknessabsence in the force, and Tiplady admits that is a priority for the Met HRteam. “The last impression we want to create is that there is a high degreeof malingering. But, of course, it’s the malingering aspect we need to dealwith and that’s where the focus will be,” he said. “We are about mid-table for the UK in terms of police force sicknessand there is scope to improve. We are trying to find out exactly what iscausing the levels of sickness we have and how we can improve.” New performance standardsA national competency framework aimed at eliminating variationsin performance between the 44 forces in England and Wales has been formallyadopted by the Chief Constables Council.It aims to standardise training, skills, responsibility andperformance for each rank, across all forces.For HR managers and directors in the service it will have a bigimpact on the way they deal with issues like planning, tenure, postings,re-deployment and sickness management. Officers and staff will be appraisedagainst specific standards for each role. The strategy has been developed by acombination of research and interviews with officers around the country and aprofile for each role has been created identifying: the core purpose of thejob; key activities; behavioural competencies and the knowledge and skill sets.The Police Reform Bill– The package includes changes to thelaw and non-legislative measures aimed at tackling variations in performance,recruitment, training and support, to help improve policing.– The measures will expand certain police powers and increasethe role of support staff working within the force– The Bill also proposes an annual policing plan based onnational priorities and allows the Home Secretary to intervene in failing forces– An Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) willencourage a more open system to increase public confidence and help bring aboutmore consistent standardswww.homeoffice.gov.uk Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Is now the time to go freelance

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Is now the time to go freelanceOn 9 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article At 45, I am at the crossroads of my career. I have 20 years’ HR experiencein both the public and private sector. I have been offered voluntary redundancywith a reasonable pay-off. I am not sure whether to go it alone in aconsultancy role or should I look for another job? John Baker, head of practice, Macmillan Davies Hodes l If you are thinking of going it alone there are a number of key factors toconsider. These include your ability to develop business, the strength of your contactsand whether you enjoy working alone. These three points are key, as yoursuccess depends on your ability to source, win and deliver consulting projectsin a very tough, competitive market. An alternative idea that would give you the independence and variety you areseeking is to become an interim manager, for which there is growing demand.Your experience of different sectors could provide you with the opportunity ofworking with diverse organisations and give you the flexibility to manage your ownwork life. The flipside of this lifestyle should also be considered, however –if you’re not working you’re not being paid. For people with consistentfinancial commitments this can be a major cause of stress. Cliff Dixon, consultant, Chiumento l The prospect of taking the money and embarking on a new career istempting, but are your skills and experience, your personality and temperamentsuited to consultancy work? An early investment in a psychometric test couldprove invaluable. The 16PF and Myers Briggs Type Indicator assessments wouldindicate areas to which you are best suited – and unsuited. How clear are you about what you have to offer as a freelance? Do you haveyour own product, or might you consider entering interim work? In any event,you will need to be a risk-taker and self-motivated with a business plan andmarketing strategy to drive forward. Looking for another job will need equally careful thought. Use the help andsupport available to you in the form of career consultants and recruitmentconsultants relevant to your sector, knowledge and expertise. Ensure your CV isstrong – include a personal profile that leaves the reader in do doubt as toyour status, abilities and values. Before deciding which route you go down, network with contacts who can guideand challenge you in your decision-making. Peter Sell, joint managing director, DMS Consultancy What is your motivation for asking the question? If it is because you havenot been satisfied by traditional HR roles, then you may need to analyse whatjob would give you satisfaction. While consultancy may seem an attractive proposition, you need to askyourself some searching questions. – As an experienced HR professional how can I differentiate myself from theother sole traders selling consultancy? – How good is my network of business contacts and are they in a position toeither buy my services or influence the purchasers in their organisation? – How long can I survive without any income? last_img read more

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Incidence of arthritis rises

first_imgMore than 7 million people in the UK – some 15 per cent of the population –now have long-term health problems caused by arthritis or a related condition,according to latest figures. The number of people with arthritis is growing, and, after mental health,the condition is now the second most common cause of time off work for men andwomen, said the Arthritis Research Campaign. Those with osteoarthritis have also risen in number, with 2 million peoplenow visiting their GP each year for treatment. The UK’s ageing population andincreasing obesity are both risk factors. Chief executive Fergus Logan said: “It’s time that arthritis is takenseriously. Arthritis is of epidemic proportions in the UK, yet it is way downthe list of everyone’s health priorities. There isn’t even a national systemfor monitoring statistics.” The charity’s report estimated that 206 million working days were lost inthe UK in 1999-2000 because of arthritis, the equivalent to a loss ofproduction of £18.1bn. More than £341m was spent on drugs prescribed for arthritis conditions. Hipand knee replacements cost £405m. Yet despite the rise in the number of people with the condition, NHSexpenditure on arthritis increased by only 5 per cent between 1990 and 1999. www.arc.org.uk Incidence of arthritis risesOn 1 Aug 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Leading by example

first_imgLeading by exampleOn 3 Oct 2002 in Personnel Today The NHS Nursing Leadership Project is designed to liberate talent and isproving to be a shining example of e-learning in actionWe often think of a nurse taking someone’s blood pressure or dressing awound, but rarely picture them dealing with a difficult employee or assessingan individual’s emotional intelligence. Plenty of nurses, however, have tomanage and deal with staff and so need to have the same leadership skillsassociated with business. Similarly, as one of the largest employers in Europe, the NHS has an ongoingneed to support and influence the workforce so it can adapt to change, improveservice and deal with challenges of new ways of working. To address these needs, it introduced the National Nursing LeadershipProject, which is now the largest leadership programme in the world, involvingsome 35,000 nurses. At the hub of the project is a website, launched in April2001 (www.nursingleadership.co.uk),through which a mass of information and resources, along with a growingcollection of e-learning courses may be accessed. Speaking about the programmeat the site’s launch, the Secretary of State for Health Alan Milburn, said that”liberating the talents of nurses helps to expand the overall capacity ofthe NHS, increases the productivity of the NHS and improves the performance ofthe NHS”. From the outset, the Government wanted e-learning to play a vital part inthe programme. But while the directive for the training came from the top, thedemand from nurses and other clinical staff for leadership development wasequally high, as was the willingness to try the new training methods, saysDavid Dawes, e-learning development manager at the NHS. Before embarking on the project, Dawes and his team carried out a majorresearch project designed to assess readiness of clinical staff and theorganisation for e-learning. “We also wanted to ascertain how and when people preferred to access itand to identify any barriers that might exist,” he says. “Followingthis, we looked at the effectiveness of the content and compared differentapproaches to e-learning.” The research found that 70 per cent of registered nurses have internetaccess, compared with 30 per cent of adults in the general population, and thatalthough 63 per cent of NHS clinicians had access to a computer at work, 59 percent of respondents preferred to learn at home. “This told us that the e-learning had to work on a standard homemodem,” says Dawes. “In terms of barriers, the biggest problems werework-life balance, lack of funds and lack of time. The other main findingrelated to the content of the courses. NHS staff felt uncomfortable withreferences to sales, profit and other business terms – and they also wanted awide choice of modules. This told us we either needed to go the bespokee-learning route or source a provider with a broad portfolio and the ability tohelp us customise content.” Following the research, the team spent six months on the exhibition andseminar circuit talking to suppliers. Cost and time factors meant a full-blownpurpose-built e-learning solution was not an option. However, because of theirvery specific needs, they knew that a wholly off-the-shelf product would be nogood either. After meeting with e-learning provider SkillSoft, it becameapparent that it would be possible to have a bit of both. “We found that the organisations which were strong at customisingdidn’t have a big enough range of courses and those that did have a decentlibrary weren’t able to offer customisation,” says Dawes. “Conversely, SkillSoft’s library contained more than 1,700 management,business and leadership modules across 21 curricula – representing in excess of5,000 hours of learning,” he says. The part-readymade, part-bespoke approach is not a typical solution requiredby clients, says SkillSoft UK managing director Kevin Young, but one that wasunderstandable given the context of the learning. “The feedback from users was that they found the learning points validbut wanted to see them in an NHS context,” he says. “Understandably,within a public sector environment like the health service, people feltuncomfortable with reference to sales and customers. As a result, the contentwas modified so that, although there were no changes to the generic learning,the images were changed to include doctors, nurses and a hospital environment.The language was adjusted so that it was more NHS-specific.” SkillSoft licensed its Course Customisation Toolkit to the NHS team andprovided training so courses could be modified in-house. This allowed the teamto merge the generic content and the NHS dialogue and visuals at a fraction ofthe cost of developing bespoke e-learning from scratch. Dawes and his team can now customise a course in 10 days and frequently doall the narration and writing themselves and, on occasion, star in thee-learning programmes. As a result SkillSoft’s involvement is now confined to a support role.SkillSoft’s Young, says: “The job has reinforced how the economies ofscale associated with generic content can enable customers to cost-effectivelycreate an end result that matches their e-learning needs. It has alsoemphasised the importance of being open and flexible in putting together asolution that matches each client’s requirements.” The pilot A pilot project was set up with 400 places allocated on a first-come,first-served basis. The course was advertised on www.nursingleadership.co.uk (nowthe gateway for all the courses) via an electronic newsletter, and on threeinternet user groups. Research had suggested there would be a high demand for the courses, whichwas borne out within three days by which time 100 volunteers had already comeforward. After three weeks there was a waiting list (69 per cent of thoseregistering found out about the course electronically, the others by word ofmouth). The average age of volunteers was 41 years with 10 per cent over 50. A number of factors unearthed in the research were substantiated by thepilot. For instance, staff often do not complete post-course assessments eventhough they enjoy the courses and apply them in practice. This, coupled withthe average time that staff spend taking a course (25 minutes) suggesting thatpeople prefer the bite-sized chunk approach – “going in, accessing theknowledge they require, and getting out again,” says Dawes. “Any future e-learning assessment strategy needs to take into accountthe reluctance of staff to complete courses in their entirety, even though theknowledge and skills are effectively applied,” he adds. Valuable feedback Sixty-nine per cent of students who had taken the SkillSoft course gaveexamples of how they had used what they learned in practice (for example, indealing with workplace stress, managing competing demands and so on) and 85 percent said they would recommend e-learning to friends and colleagues. The topfive suggested improvements were to make the e-learning more NHS-orientated,offer easier access, hold more group meetings and offer faster and moreinformation and guidance. Dawes also reported back with a number of other findings after the pilot,which he believes have a value for all sectors: – E-learning appeals to a wide age-group and is in demand by healthprofessionals inside and outside the NHS – and the UK – There is demand for leadership development at all levels – from directorlevel to the recently qualified clinician – There is a high demand for e-learning – the motivation is primarilypersonal development and personal interest, with less than 25 per centmotivated by career development – The most essential characteristic of an e-learning programme is that it isfree to users, and, ideally, offers some sort of accreditation – Facilitated e-learning (that which has a supervising tutor and/or aclassroom component) seems to have similar starting, completion andapplication-in-practice rates “Facilitated e-learning does not appear to be significantly moreeffective that automated e-learning,” says Dawes, “although itappears to be several hundred times more expensive.” Dawes estimates that the cost of each e-learning course per learner is 52p. The NHS is now half-way through the second stage of the project, which aimsto train up to 40,000 staff over two years and Dawes has lots of interest inthe project from elsewhere in the NHS – doctors, health visitors, allied healthprofessionals and managers are all using it, although it is primarily aimed atnurses. Five courses are currently up and running on the Nursing Leadership websitesite including modules on emotional intelligence, stress management, timemanagement, project management, dealing with difficult people and dealing withconflict. By Christmas it aims to have 20 courses up and running and based onthe success of the pilot, all future NHS training programmes will have ane-learning element. The NHS project proves that having a very dedicated in-house team, who areprepared to not only research the needs of the workforce but to roll up theirsleeves and shape the learning to suit the learners, can make the differencebetween success and failure in a project. In summarySuccess for The NHS leadership project The NHS aim To provide aprogramme of leadership training for nurses.Why? To liberate the talents of nurses which in turnwill improve performance and increase productivity.Is e-learning delivering? The 400-people pilot was agreat success and provided valuable user feedback. It is too early for ROIfigures, but Dawes reports that each course costs only 52p per learner, amassive saving on previous classroom-based training.NHS top tips – Fit the learning around people’sexisting work-life balance and do not demand a large commitment– Make content available over the internet– Make it available in bite-size chunks Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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