My mentor

first_img Comments are closed. My mentorOn 21 Aug 2001 in Personnel Today Bruce Robertson, head of HR at Pret a Manger, on the qualities that makeKathryn Matz, who owns an HR consultancy, his career confidante since theirtime together at HarrodsBruce Robertson’s career leapt forward when his mentor presented him with thesort of opportunity that not even a fool would turn down. At the tender age of 25, he found himself promoted to head of HR forHarrods, responsible for 6,000 employees and a team of 18 HR managers andofficers. Now head of HR for Pret à Manger, Robertson met Kathryn Matz when they bothworked at Harrods. He was personnel manager of the Harrods fashion directoratewhile Matz, who now owns a management consultancy in San Francisco, was HRdirector. Robertson describes Matz as tenacious with a tough management style.”She’s never been afraid to challenge things or to change things,” hesays. They share the same drive, says Roberston, but he wishes his memory wasmore like hers. “Kathryn never forgets a thing and has an amazing workingmemory.” Robertson admires Matz’s ability to link everything HR does to business. Shetaught him that if the profession is to be accepted by the business, then ithas to prove its influence and be able to offer serious arguments behind anydesires for change. But his most significant lesson was learning not to be knocked back by ageprejudices, which he encountered when he was promoted. Matz left four years ago to return to the US, but they are still in touch.Robertson still bounces ideas off her, but jokes that he hopes that these daysit is more of a two-way process. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Read More →

Blackstone to pay $1B for Japan residential and commercial portfolio

first_imgStephen Schwarzman and Tokyo (Getty, iStock)Blackstone is picking up a portfolio of commercial and residential properties in Japan for the equivalent of $1.06 billion.It’s the New York-based private equity firm’s fourth major real estate acquisition in Japan this year and brings its total acquisitions in the country to $5.2 billion, according to Mingtiandi.Hong Kong-based fund PAG is on the other side of the deal, which closed around a month ago.The portfolio consists mostly of properties in Tokyo and Osaka that PAG acquired in a $1 billion deal in 2015.That portfolio, PAG CEO Weijian Shan said, was “comprised of 26 high-quality properties” and was “predominantly office buildings in Tokyo.”In March, Blackstone paid the equivalent of $2.7 billion for a portfolio of 220 rental properties, also concentrated between Tokyo and Osaka. It was a core-plus buy and Blackstone plans to increase rents and fill vacant units.Then in July, the firm bought four warehouse properties from Daiwa House Industries. Around the same time the PAG deal closed, Blackstone agreed to buy the residential unit of Mitsukoshi Real Estate.PAG recently allocated 840 billion yen for acquisitions in the country over the next four years, according to IPE Real Assets. [Mingtiandi] — Dennis Lynch  Share via Shortlink TagsBlackstonecenter_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

Read More →

Utah State Men’s Basketball Hosts Colorado State Saturday

first_imgThe Aggies have dominated opponents on the season, netting 78.6 points per game and surrendering only 65.2 points per contest. The Rams come into this game at 7-10 and 2-2 in Mountain West play. They have been outscored 1224-1207 (76.5-75.4 points per game) on the season. Colorado State’s statistical leaders are redshirt junior forward/center Nico Carvacho (16.2 points, 12.7 rebounds per game) and redshirt senior guard J.D. Paige (15 points per game). FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah-Saturday, Utah State men’s basketball (13-5, 3-2 in Mountain West play) hosts Colorado State at the Spectrum as conference play continues for the Aggies. January 18, 2019 /Sports News – Local Utah State Men’s Basketball Hosts Colorado State Saturday Junior guard Sam Merrill remains Utah State’s statistical leader, scoring 18.9 points per game and shooting 90.3 percent (84 of 93) at the foul line. While the Aggies are at home for this one, their 81-63 win at San Jose State Thursday gave them consecutive road victories for the first time since the 2016-17 season.center_img The Aggies’ defense has proven instrumental in their victories. When they surrender 69 points or less, they are 11-1 on the season. Written by Tags: Colorado State Rams men’s basketball/J.D. Paige/Nico Carvacho/Sam Merrill/San Jose State/USU Men’s Basketball The Aggies lead the all-time series against the Rams 58-40 and are 17-8 in the series at Logan. Brad Jameslast_img read more

Read More →

Fraud and cyber crime in the conveyancing process

first_imgHome » News » Fraud and cyber crime in the conveyancing process previous nextProducts & ServicesFraud and cyber crime in the conveyancing processFind out more at the Society of Licensed Conveyancers Spring Roadshows.The Negotiator14th April 20160637 Views The Society of Licensed Conveyancers (SLC) is delighted to announce that the dates and venues for the SLC Spring Road Shows for 2016 have now been confirmed.Tuesday April 26th – Cambridge United Football ClubWednesday May 4th –Howdens Group Office, LondonWednesday May 18th – Mercure Hotel, CardiffTuesday May 24th – Macdonald Hotel, ManchesterThe Spring Road Shows this year are focused on the subjects of fraud and cybercrime with particular reference to the conveyancing process and measures that conveyancers can take to mitigate these risks.These subjects have never been of greater prominence for the legal profession and the Road Shows are a great opportunity for all conveyancers, regardless of qualifications, to hear first hand from experts on these subjects.The speakers for Cambridge will include Neil Scriven from Barclays Bank, Paul Tucker from Lawyer Checker, Ed Powell from Safe Move, as well as Tom Horrocks from Cpm21 focusing on cybercrime and the conveyancing process. The Society will also launch its new cybercrime insurance policy, provided by Howdens, at the Road Shows.Simon Law, SLC Chairman said, ‘Much has been said and written about fraud and cyber crime in recent times. They are subjects which affect so many aspects of everyday life, not just lawyers and in particular conveyancers. The problem is that the criminal element will always find new ways to get around the protective measures and systems that are constantly being developed. The Spring Road shows this year will be dedicated to the subjects of fraud and cybercrime and will be focused on conveyancing.’The Roadshows are free for members to attend and priced at £75.00 for non-members.The road shows will start at 9:45 and run to 3 pm and will carry 4 CPD points. Lunch will be provided.To book your space, please e-mail [email protected] or call Ania on 08714 237193.SLC SLC Spring Road Shows The Society of Licensed Conveyancers fraud and cybercrime April 14, 2016The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Read More →

First county court moves to ban evictions before legislation is passed

first_imgHome » News » First county court moves to ban evictions before legislation is passed previous nextRegulation & LawFirst county court moves to ban evictions before legislation is passedEvictions specialist Landlord Action reveals first court adjournment announcement in Blackpool ahead of government emergency laws.Sheila Manchester23rd March 202001,032 Views Landlord Action has received its first court adjournment from Blackpool County Court for a Section 8 eviction, after the government announced this week it is to ban evictions and introduce three-month mortgage payment holidays for landlords whose tenants are struggling to pay rent due to coronavirus.A statement from the county court says all new eviction proceedings will now be adjourned until June.Action taken by Blackpool County Court is likely to be followed by other county courts handling Section 8 evictions, despite the fact that the government has yet to introduce its emergency legislation.Paul Shamplina (pictured, above), founder of Landlord Action says “There will be many adjournments, and this was the first that came through yesterday from Blackpool County Court on a section 8 case.“We are still awaiting the government’s decision as to when possession claims have to be stopped at court for a three-month period. But it wouldn’t surprise me if the courts soon shut down for a period of time.  We are in unknown territory. Our advice line at Landlord Action has been extremely busy advising concerned landlords.“If landlords are experiencing adjournments, they need to provide the court order to their lender so that they can ask or their mortgage payments to be suspended.”The court said:(i) There is a public health emergency caused by the Covid 19 pandemic and that it is likely to have economic consequences on the continued occupation of residential dwellings by those who have not or cannot meet the charges associated with occupation;(ii) That the declared intention of the Government is to pass emergency legislation to prevent evictions of those who rent residential property during the pandemic;(iii) That the Government has invited lenders to support borrowers by way of mortgage holidays’ in respect of mortgages secured on residential properties;(iv) That enforcement of any possession orders is unlikely to be in the interests of justice at this stage.Read more about emergency evictions plan.covid-19 coronavirus Landlord Action Paul Shamplina evictions March 23, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Read More →

German Navy puts new Sea Lion helicopters into operation

first_imgIn total, eighteen Sea Lions are ordered by the navy, with deliveries expected to be completed in 2022. Back to overview,Home naval-today German Navy puts new Sea Lion helicopters into operation Authorities Naida Hakirevic June 8, 2020, by The three multipurpose helicopters are stationed at Naval Aviation Squadron 5 in Nordholz. On June 4, the navy officially took over the three Sea Lions that were built by Airbus Helicopters. Thanks to its multi-role capability and growth capability, the Sea Lion will not only replace the German Navy’s Sea King Mk41 fleet but significantly enhance its operational capabilities. The fly-by-wire flight controls of the NH90 Sea Lion reduce the crew’s workload thanks to its high precision and ease of use, which particularly come to the fore in over-water hovering, even in poor weather conditions. Photo: German Navy View post tag: German Navycenter_img German Navy puts new Sea Lion helicopters into operation On June 8, the German Navy started flight operations with the first new NATO Helicopter 90 Naval Transport Helicopter (NH90 NTH) ‘Sea Lion’. The units are expected to be fully operational in 2023 and replace the navy’s aging fleet of Sea King helicopters.  NH90 Sea Lions will take on a wide range of roles including search and rescue (SAR), maritime reconnaissance, special forces as well as personnel and material transportation missions. In addition to its land-based use, the Sea Lion will also operate on Type 702 (Berlin class) combat support ships. View post tag: Helicopters Share this article View post tag: NH90 Sea Lionlast_img read more

Read More →

Oxford historians angry at Foreign Office archive

Oxford historians have expressed fear that much scholarship on British history may have to be rethought, after it emerged that the Foreign Office had kept 1.2 million files back from public release in contravention of the Public Records Acts.On Wednesday, academics from the British Academy, including 15 from Oxford, published an open letter calling upon the Foreign Secretary to declassify the files. The British Academy are currently in the process of seeking legal advice to challenge the FCO. The files, some of which date back to the Crimean War, contain information on a wide range of matters, including colonial affairs, international relations, and spy rings. Historians fear that in an attempt to protect Britain’s global image, the understanding of history may have been tainted.Nuffield College Professor Iain McLean, Vice-President of Public Policy at the British Academy, was amongst the signatories of the letter. He said, “We know from the recent revelations regarding the Mau Mau uprising that many of these documents are likely to be damaging [to Britain’s image]. It seems likely that other hidden documents may be damaging too”. Speaking to Cherwell, McLean expressed the importance of public archives in shaping how we understand the past, citing the example of how they were used to expose the deficiencies of authorities during the 1966 Aberfan disaster. Another signatory, Professor Archie Brown of St Anthony’s College, told Cherwell, “While some of the files held back may be for respectable reasons – such as protecting foreign intelligence informants who are still alive – the historical period covered is too long for this to be a convincing explanation more generally. I should be very surprised if the files did not contain information that showed British governments and their representatives in an embarrassingly bad light”. He continued, “While they might be unlikely to lead to entirely original interpretations of significant episodes, never voiced before, their importance could lie in shifting the weight of evidence in favour of one existing interpretation rather than another”. “The aim in keeping them secret may well have been to protect Britain’s image and influence abroad, but it is the wrong way to go about it”. Robert Gildea, Professor of Modern History at Worcester College, said that “shameful episodes” may have been hidden, adding, “Great Britain sees itself as a leader of the free world and an open society, but great powers did not become great by being nice to everybody”. The existence of the secret archive was revealed by the Guardian last October. Housed in a high-security facility at Hanslope Park, the archive contains 15 miles of floor-to-ceiling shelving, thought to amount to more files than all other non-disclosed government collections combined. The Public Records Acts require that government files must be released into the National Archive after a maximum of 30 years, soon to be decreased to 20. The British Academy’s letter stated, “Those of us who work on the history of some other countries are used to government obstruction when it comes to researching official papers, but the UK is supposed to be a free society. The writing of full and impartial accounts of the cold war, Britain’s colonial past, and other key subjects depends on access to all the available records”. read more

Read More →

Alumni Re-Elect Shoulders To IU Board Of Trustees

first_imgAlumni Re-Elect Shoulders To IU Board Of Trustees BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University alumni have re-elected Patrick A. Shoulders of Evansville, Indiana, to a sixth term on the IU Board of Trustees. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare The image caption followsPatrick A. Shoulderscenter_img Shoulders, a partner with the Evansville law firm of Ziemer, Stayman, Weitzel and Shoulders, was initially appointed an IU trustee in 2002 by Gov. Frank O’Bannon. He then was elected to the board by alumni in 2005, 2008, 2011, 2014 and again this yearShoulders received 5,734 votes compared to 3,013 for Craig D. Wells of Franklin, Indiana, and 1,521 for Dennis Elliott of Bloomington. Voting ended at 10 a.m. today. “I am honored that our alumni have again chosen me to represent them,” Shoulders said. “Indiana University has a dedicated, highly accomplished board, and it is an honor to be part of it. I’m especially pleased that I will be on the board for the opening of the new medical education campus in downtown Evansville and for the celebration of the university’s 200th anniversary in 2020.”In accordance with state law, the trustee election is conducted by the dean of University Libraries on the IU Bloomington campus, with assistance from the IU Alumni Association. Library staff and students were charged with counting the more than 10,000 ballots.“Trustee Shoulders has compiled a remarkable record of service and dedication to Indiana University,” IU President Michael A. McRobbie said. “His passion and loyalty have been invaluable as the university has strengthened its commitment to excellence and its growing value to the state of Indiana. I am delighted that he will continue to serve as the university’s bicentennial approaches.”Shoulders holds two IU degrees: a J.D. (magna cum laude) from the IU McKinney School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts from IU Bloomington. He was national chair of the IU Alumni Association in 2000 and has served as a director of the Varsity Club and on the IU Foundation Board of Directors. He is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, has played a leadership role in a number of professional organizations and has long been deeply involved in the Evansville community.Indiana University has nine trustees, three of whom are elected by alumni. The other alumni trustees are Philip N. Eskew Jr. of North Webster, Indiana, and MaryEllen Kiley Bishop of Carmel, Indiana.The other six trustees are appointed by the governor of Indiana. Gov. Eric Holcomb this month appointed Indianapolis attorney Harry L. Gonso and re-appointed Fort Wayne physician Michael J. Mirro. Holcomb also appointed Zachary Arnold, a medical student at the IU School of Medicine center in Muncie, Indiana, to a two-year term as student trustee. Other trustees are W. Quinn Buckner and James T. Morris of Indianapolis and Melanie S. Walker of Bloomington.last_img read more

Read More →

O.C. Intermediate School Creates Food Donation Boxes

first_imgFrom left, student Josh Stevens, building supervisor Todd Lauer, student John Gaskill and shop and STEM teacher Stu Lichtenstein display a food donation box at the Ocean City Intermediate School. (Photo courtesy JASM Consulting) For four weeks, the Ocean City Intermediate School has been working on a project to make food donation boxes.The boxes serve as a drop-off spot for renters who have leftover non-perishable foods when they are finishing up their vacation, according to a press release.“The whole idea started when my wife and I were on vacation and we didn’t know what to do with our leftover non-perishable food,” said Todd Lauer, building supervisor at the Intermediate School. “I came home from vacation thinking about all of the out-of-town renters we have here in Ocean City and wanted to turn their leftovers into a positive.”Lauer continued, “When I approached Ocean City Intermediate School Shop and STEM teacher Stu Lichtenstein about this, we came up with an idea to create a food drop box. Our goal is to be able to deliver at least one pick-up truck full of donations.”The design was conceptualized with the help of some of Lichtenstein’s shop students. After purchasing the wood, about 20 of his students participated in constructing the boxes, which have been placed outside the school for donations.Food donation boxes will sit outside the Ocean City Intermediate School at 1801 Bay Avenue.Science teacher and leader of the Garden Club, Corey Terry, and her club were recruited to see if they would be interested in helping out with this project due to the box’s placement. The Garden Club, along with the help of LAL teacher, Elizabeth Lehman, came up with a flier that explained what the project was about and guidelines for donating.“The food boxes will provide the less fortunate with food that would otherwise be discarded,” said Intermediate School Principal Geoff Haines. “There is so much food left over when vacationers pack up and head home that becomes trash and wasted. It is an awesome opportunity to turn this into something good. The students at OCIS did a wonderful job in creating these bins in woodshop class as we always try to teach service to community.”The Food Drive donation boxes for non-perishable foods are located outside the Ocean City Intermediate School at 1801 Bay Avenue. The food that is collected is donated to the Food Bank of New Jersey.last_img read more

Read More →

Living the lessons we have learned

first_imgEngraved on a large slate plaque affixed to Matthews Hall in Harvard Yard is the story of Native Americans’ past and the narrative of our future. That is the site of the original Indian College, Harvard’s first brick building, where more than 350 years ago Caleb Cheeshahteaumuck and Joel Iacoomes of the Wampanoag Tribe of Aquinnah on Martha’s Vineyard lived and studied alongside English students. Caleb was the first Native American to graduate from Harvard, in 1665.The Indian College also housed the College’s printing press, on which the first Bible in North America was printed. The Bible was a translation into the Algonquian Indian language.Behind the plaque’s inscription is a faint, incised representation of a turtle, a powerful symbol in Native American creation stories. The turtle represents many things. One is a creative source, the most powerful force we possess. The turtle also embodies a sense of being well-grounded, self-contained, with a steady approach to life. These qualities resonate with many of the lessons learned at Harvard.I soon will be an unlikely graduate of the University. My grandfather, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota, experienced a precarious childhood. Grinding poverty, disease, and despair had taken root across the reservation in the early 1900s. Often there was not enough food or fuel. His brother, along with thousands of other Indian children, was taken from his family and sent far away to an Indian boarding school in Carlisle, Penn. Boarding schools were part of the federal government’s assimilationist policies aimed at severing Indians’ ties to the land.Like so many Indian children, my grandfather grew up with his feet in two worlds. One foot was in the Indian world, rich with traditions and ceremonies, a language that nurtured his spirit and heart, and a homeland that gave him a sense of place. His other foot was in the fast-paced white world of trains and cars and different habits. Like so many Indian children of that time, he grew up confused about his identity and indefinite place in American society.I delved into this history as a law student. It was very disturbing to learn that two generations later things had not greatly improved in Indian country. The wholesale removal of Indian children from their homes and the displacement of their families continued well into the 1970s. This has been the most tragic aspect of Indian life today. Children everywhere deserve to grow up in a safe, stable, and nurturing environment.I decided then to work for the rights of Native American tribes to be self-determined and self-sufficient, and to help improve conditions on Indian reservations. This work, like development work throughout the world, requires a turtle approach: One must be creative, well-grounded, and have steadfast determination, even in the face of daunting obstacles or discouragement. (After graduation, I plan to return to Vermillion, S.D., where I teach federal Indian law and direct the Institute of American Indian Studies at the University of South Dakota.)Constancy served Caleb well at Harvard. Despite the hardships of being away from his family and the contradictions of living in the white man’s world, he earned honors in his studies. Sadly, his life, like Joel’s, was cut short by the perils of the time. After Caleb graduated, there was no identifiable Native American presence at Harvard for more than 250 years. Now, about 120 Native American students from 40 tribes study at Harvard every year.Many Native American students at Harvard still struggle with the contradictions that Caleb and Joel faced. We still have our feet in two worlds. One day we are in our jeans studying economic theory, and the next we are in our jingle dresses dancing at the powwow. Soon we will be in the Yard receiving our degrees, and shortly after we will be fishing or hunting to feed the community. What matters is that we have persisted — that our language, traditions, and culture have endured. While our time at Harvard has given us a sense of place here, what we have learned will extend far beyond these ivy-covered walls. It will reach across all of our borders and become a part of our communities.Culture mattered then and matters today. The diversity of our cultures is the underpinning of our human bonds, and of our intolerance and prejudice as well. Caleb and Joel lived and studied alongside their ethnic English classmates at a time when the two cultures disputed one another’s right to exist on the continent. Three centuries later, we persist, mostly intact, and determined as ever.Diversity abounds at Harvard today. Diversity in race and ethnicities, of different religious beliefs and spiritual practices, and in widely varied talents and interests. This diversity, spurred many years ago by Caleb and Joel, not only invigorates the vitality of our learning experience, it cultivates a broader and more insightful view of the world.The lessons gleaned from the plaque affixed to Matthews Hall continue to inspire us to know the human value of the world and to place ourselves within it. There is certainty in the lessons we have learned from the past, of being creative, well-grounded, and steadfast. Let us not linger, for there is no time to spare. So let us begin.last_img read more

Read More →