Entry deadline nears for Scotch pie champs

first_imgThe deadline is looming for the World Scotch Pie Championships, so make sure you get your entries in.Bakers and butchers will again go head to head in a battle of the pies, with entries due in no later than 19 November.As well as the hotly-contested Scotch pie category, there are many other classes, including: best sausage rolls, bridies and speciality savouries, as well as the new category of football pies.   Products should be delivered to the Carnegie Conference Centre in Dunfermline, for judging, between 9.00am and 11.30am on Tuesday 27 November 2012.The winners will be announced at a special awards ceremony in January 2013.Alan Stuart, competition founder, said: “The World Scotch Pie Championships truly are a benchmark. We have a huge number of hard-working butchers and bakers who deserve recognition for delivering great products day in and day out.”Butcher John G Renicks from Dumfries & Galloway took the title of World Scotch Pie Champion 2012.For more information please contact Julie Fourcade on 07958 736056 [email protected]last_img read more

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Floor and drainage upgraded at Brioche Pasquier bakery plant

first_imgFrench bakery and patisserie producer Brioche Pasquier has had a food-grade hygiene flooring and drainage system installed at its bakery in Milton Keynes.Brioche Pasquier required a specific tiled flooring similar to the floors installed in its other plants throughout France, Spain and the US.Kemtile, which completed the floor installation, recommended its Kagetec ceramic floor tiling system, using 18mm-thick hexagonal ceramic floor tiles. The Kagetec system was consequently laid throughout the 6,000sq m plant.“The site is part of the group’s international growth development plans – which aims to extend the reach and up production of our Brioche products such as croissants, pains au chocolat and filled brioches,” said Eric Jouet, industrial and operations director at Brioche Pasquier UK.“We could not have afforded to make the wrong flooring specification decision – in terms of production time and investment – and we are more than confident in the decision we made to work with the Kemtile team.”last_img read more

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Watch Greensky Bluegrass Jam With Keller Williams, Teasing Phish At Summer Camp Fest

first_imgIf there’s one thing Greensky Bluegrass knows. it’s how to mix business and pleasure. During their Friday set on the Moonshine Stage at the Summer Camp Music Festival, it’s hard to say who was enjoying themselves more – the band or the crowd. Mixing songs from throughout their catalog and even being joined by the band-proclaimed “Coolest Guy At The Festival,” Keller Williams, the band delivered a rollicking set full of silliness and sing-a-longs.Our own Rex Thomson was on hand to film the proceedings and has shared a few of the highlights, including a loopy call-and-response number between drop steel player Anders Beck and mandolinist Paul Hoffman, with Keller Williams on “trumpet.” The song also featured a tease of Phish’s “Run Like An Antelope.” Check out the fun below:JaywalkingWings For WheelsFo Sho Uh-Huh With Keller WilliamsSetlist: Greensky Bluegrass at Summer Camp Music Festival, Chillicothe, IL – 5/27/2016Set: Jaywalking > Don’t Lie (1), Wings for Wheels, Demons, Luckiest Man (2) (3), Just to Lie (4) > Take Cover, For Sure Uh Huh (5) (6), Pig in a Pen, Atlantic City, Leap Year  (1) ‘Let Me Ride’ lyrics & teases  (2) w/ Al Schnier(3) ‘Say It Ain’t So’ quotes  (4) ‘Labor of Love’ quotes  (5) Keller Williams on vocal jams & dobro slide(6) ‘Run Like an Antelope’ quoteslast_img read more

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John Mayer Comments On “Wildness” Surrounding Woodstock 50’s Uncertain Status

first_imgAs music fans charge towards summer and festival season, it’s become impossible to ignore the behind-the-scenes drama surrounding the highly-anticipated Woodstock 50 event which is (supposedly) scheduled to take place at Watkins Glen International Raceway in August.Related: John Fogerty Shares Doubt Surrounding Ongoing Woodstock 50 Drama In New InterviewThe event, which continues to unfold like a slow-moving car crash, has been plagued with production issues ranging from supposed cancellations to lawsuits to tickets that never went on sale to the brand’s overambitious potential for global expansion.One of the headlining acts scheduled to perform at the Woodstock 50th anniversary event is Dead & Company. The band’s lead guitarist, John Mayer, seems to be in the same boat of confusion as the fans in regards to the status of the event. Mayer was a featured guest on SiriusXM earlier this week, where he shared his thoughts on the troubled festival.TV’s Andy Cohen Talks Raging Dead & Co Tour With Mickey Hart’s Wife On Seth Meyers [Watch]“I’m as much of a spectator as anyone else is to this wildness. I was told, ‘Yeah it’s not happening.’ There’s only one person still saying, ‘No, it’s gonna go,’” Mayer said while discussing the event with Andy Cohen. “It reminds me of the scene in Monty Python [and The Holy Grail] where the knight is now missing the arm and the leg and he’s hopping up and down and saying, ‘It’s just a flesh wound.’ If those guys [Dead & Company] end up going, I will go, but it seems to me now: ‘It’s just a flesh wound’ and blood is spurting everywhere.”You can listen to this segment of the interview below:John Mayer Talks Woodstock Drama with Andy Cohen[Video: Radio Andy]On Monday, lawyers for Dentsu, the event’s former financiers, responded to Woodstock co-founder Michael Lang‘s legal claims that the organization has unlawfully ruined chances of the festival taking place in 2019.“Woodstock 50 LLC’s and Michael Lang’s misrepresentations, incompetence, and contractual breaches have made it impossible to produce a high-quality event that is safe and secure for concertgoers, artists, and staff,” Dentsulawyers shared in a statement.[H/T Relix]last_img read more

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Applications open for M-RCBG senior fellows program

first_imgThe Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government (M-RCBG) is accepting applications for its senior fellows program. Senior fellows are distinguished professionals from government or business who come to M-RCBG to address issues at the interface of government and business: regulation, corporate governance and corporate social responsibility, and the role of government in the changing global economy. Many senior fellows undertake independent research projects, while others work closely with center research programs.For eligibility requirements and more information, or email [email protected] The deadline is April 1.last_img

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Women, overshadowed

first_imgWhile the pay gap between men and women stubbornly remains, gender discrepancies in other important realms, like education, have closed. Women in 2014 were more likely to have a bachelor’s degree than men for the first time since the U.S. Census bureau began collecting higher education statistics in 1940. In fact, since the 2005-2006 academic year, women have received the majority of the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees conferred nationally, according to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), a research body within the U.S. Department of Education.Despite the advances, women hold just 37.5 percent of the tenured positions at U.S. colleges and universities, even though they held nearly half (48.4 percent) of all tenure-track positions in 2013, NCES data show. Women in an array of fields report experiencing treatment suggesting they’re less valued by employers than their male counterparts, including getting lower pay and fewer promotions, seeing male colleagues praised or taking credit for ideas that were first voiced by a woman — but ignored — or presumptions that a woman must be a junior team member in a coed working group, rather than the leader.After hearing such complaints from friends, Heather Sarsons, a Ph.D. student in economics and a doctoral fellow in the Harvard Kennedy School’s Multidisciplinary Program on Inequality and Social Policy, wondered about this feeling that women were getting shortchanged when it came to receiving their due recognition in fields historically dominated by men, like STEM, technology, and economics.Sarsons said that despite the uptick of women in doctoral programs for economics, they remain underrepresented, both in number and in proportion to their degree attainment, among the ranks of tenured faculty. It’s a troubling gap that the field has been grappling with for some time.Because research papers published during the first several years of a career are so critical in determining whether a young economist receives tenure, Sarsons reviewed 40 years of data on the publishing track record of people who were recruited by top U.S. universities to see whether the disparate tenure rates between men and women were related to the number or type of papers on which each gender was evaluated.She found that women economists suffer a “co-author penalty.” While men receive the same professional credit for solo-authored papers as for work done with a woman or another man, women aren’t properly credited for their work when they co-author a paper with a male colleague. It appears the only time women get full credit, Sarsons said, is when they work alone or team up with another woman — both less than optimal scenarios for fairness, given the inherently collaborative and complex nature of economics research.The Gazette spoke with Sarsons about why women appear to be penalized for working with men, the reaction her work has received, and what can be done about it.GAZETTE: What did you set out to learn, and what did you find?SARSONS: I wanted to see if there were differences in how a co-authored publication matters for a woman’s career advancement as compared to a man. I found that an additional co-authored paper, while it’s still positively correlated with receiving tenure for a woman, leads to a much weaker effect than a boost that a man receives. An additional co-authored paper for a man is counted as the same as a solo-authored paper, according to my results. But for a woman, it’s weighted much less than if she had written the paper on her own. Because these are all just correlations, I can’t say exactly what’s going on. But I tried to look at whether women are presenting less or whether they know that the returns for co-authoring are a bit lower, like they’re not going to get as much credit, because then they might be co-authoring strategically. I didn’t find evidence of any of those theories.Because in economics the authors are listed alphabetically, you can’t tell who did what on the paper. So I just wanted to see if when women co-author, is their contribution discounted? To look at that, I looked at whether or not they received tenure. I compare women who co-author a lot to women who write most of their papers on their own, and you see this really different relationship with tenure.Graphic by Judy Blomquist/Harvard StaffGAZETTE: Is what you call the “co-author penalty” for women the result of explicit bias?SARSONS: I can’t say for sure. I would guess it’s unconscious bias because I have found myself sometimes, if I’ll read a paper and I haven’t looked at the author’s name and then I look and it’s a woman, I find that I’m kind of surprised. And I am a woman, so I shouldn’t be having that kind of reaction. I think when you’re in a male-dominated profession, it’s easy to have that kind of mindset. It could also be that when women work on a paper with a group, they take less credit for it. I did a survey with current faculty at a bunch of different econ departments and asked if they’re more or less likely to present their co-authored work than their [male] co-authors. And women said that they’re just as likely to present their joint work as their [male] co-authors, so it doesn’t seem like it has anything to do with [women] not presenting their work [or that] they let the man present the work. It could be something much more subtle, like when they talk about their work with others, they really downplay their own contribution, whereas men don’t do that.GAZETTE: What prompted your interest in this research?SARSONS: I was working on another project with my advisor on how minority students are perceived [when] working in a group and, if there’s a policy like affirmative action in place, for example, if women and minority students get the short end of the stick and people make assumptions about how much they’ve contributed that are inaccurate. It’s something that has come up in talking with some of my friends who are in academia about [how] they’ve worked on something in a group and felt like they didn’t necessarily get as much credit as their male co-authors did, especially in the sciences. So I got interested and wondered if this was something that is actually happening.GAZETTE: What kind of reaction have you gotten from colleagues?SARSONS: I’ve gotten mixed reactions. Most people have been surprised. A few people have said, “I’m not surprised; I’ve sat on a tenure committee before, and this definitely came up.” Like when they were evaluating a woman’s research, it came up, like “How much do we think she actually contributed?” But more often than not, I think people have been surprised. Within economics, there has been a conversation around gender bias, but it hasn’t focused on group work and how we perceive group work and people’s contributions. I think people are surprised by how large the effect is. The faculty has been really helpful in trying to figure out what are the different things that could possibly be explaining this and how I could go about testing this.GAZETTE: Many who first read about your paper in The New York Times recently said this problem of undervalued contributions exists in many domains, such as STEM fields and business. Do you think your findings might explain some of those gaps, or are they unique to economics?SARSONS: I can’t say for sure. I wouldn’t be surprised if this happened in other areas of work. Since the article came out, I’ve received quite a few emails from women in law or in the tech industry, and they said kind of the same thing: When they’re working on a project, their supervisor or whoever is above them doesn’t see the group working on it, and they felt like their contribution has been undervalued, and that’s manifested itself in differential bonus payments and that kind of thing. So it’s all anecdotal evidence; it’s very possible, and it would be interesting to get data from different industries to see if this does show up in law or in tech.GAZETTE: So what should individual women do, and are there any systemic remedies that might be effective?SARSONS: Changing the alphabetical [traditional credit] to order of contribution could help. I would worry that then you might get into the problem of, if women are less likely to speak up and say, “This is my contribution, and so I should be first author,” then the problem remains. My hope in doing this is just that it brings this phenomenon to light, and then in the long run I hope when people are evaluating work they might stop and think twice how they’re dividing credit. It is also about women not taking enough credit for their work, maybe being a bit more assertive there. The immediate reaction people have is “Oh, women should solo author.” That’s not really what I wanted to get across. I don’t think women should have to change their behavior, because it’s much more fun to collaborate, and you write better papers. I hope just bringing this to light will make some people slow down when they’re making these decisions and think about whether they’re giving credit unequally based on gender or race.GAZETTE: Knowing what you know now, will this change how you’ll approach research in the future?SARSONS: I don’t think so. I would maybe try to be a bit more conscious about what I’m doing and the ownership I’m taking over my work, but I much prefer to collaborate than write papers on my own. I’d be very sad if I got to the tenure point and then this all kind of backfired. But I don’t think I will not collaborate because of this.This interview was lightly edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

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New York Chief Regulator cuts Bitcoin startups some slack

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Unveiling a series of proposed new virtual currency regulations for New York state—which will likely be copied by other states and potentially federal regulators as well—Benjamin M. Lawsky, the superintendent of the New York State Department Of Financial Services, said that virtual currency startups need room to experiment and new proposals will grant them that slack.The proposal envisions “additional flexibility for virtual currency startups to innovate, while at the same time maintaining our commitment to protecting consumers and rooting out illicit activity,” Lawsky told attendees at the Bipartisan Policy Center on Regulating Virtual Currencies and Payments Technology in Washington, D.C., on Thursday (Dec. 18). “The revised regulation will offer a two-year transitional BitLicense, which may be issued to those firms who are unable to satisfy all of the requirements of a full license, and will be tailored to startups and small businesses. That transitional BitLicense will help provide start-ups an on-ramp as they build up their operations.”Among other key changes that Lawsky outlined:Developers Free To Code Away. “The revised regulation will clarify that we do not intend to regulate software development. For example, a software developer who creates and provides wallet software to customers for personal use will not need a license. We are regulating financial intermediaries. We are not regulating software development.”Rewards Won’t Be Punished. “Customer loyalty programs, rewards, and gift cards denominated in fiat currency will not fall under the BitLicense. Some commenters believed that the regulation could be read to encompass those activities, but it does not.” continue reading »last_img read more

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Credit unions beat banks in all fee categories

first_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Two surveys revealed stark differences between the fees charged by credit unions and those charged by banks. The comparison showed credit unions gave banks a run for their money.A MoneyRates.com survey of banks showed an average yearly checking account maintenance fee of $159 per year for the average American. However, a Bankrate.com survey showed a range of $1 to $10 per month for maintenance fees at credit unions (with $2 per month being the most common), for an average of $24 per year up to a premium of $120. continue reading »last_img

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5 areas that could plague your team

first_img 32SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details When a team works well together, the results can be magnificent. When your team isn’t running well, the results won’t be ideal. Here are 5 areas that could plague your team.  Be on the lookout for these, and if you see an issue arise, nip it in the bud.Decision making: When your team has to make decisions together, disagreements are inevitable. Make sure everyone gets to voice their opinion. They won’t always get their way, and they need to understand that the majority rules and they have to deal with it.Communication: When communication lines are broken, all kinds of problems are likely to occur. Lead by example, encourage open communication, and help your team understand that everyone has different preferences when it comes to how they communicate in the office.Participation: In order for your team to be effective, they need to pull their own weight. Sometimes, participation issues stem from a bad egg. Other times, employees are left out of the loop. When your team leaders are delegating properly, everyone will be involved and be given the right task, according to their skills sets. When this is done right, participation won’t be an issue.Trust: Trust is absolutely vital. Give your teams repeated opportunities to bond outside the office. This familiarity will lead to engagement and trust. By helping your team mesh, you’ll help them be successful.Vision: Your team should be striving to attain a common goal. Make sure they know where you want to go, and why. When the pathway is clear and individual purposes are laid out, your team will find it easier to travel in the same direction.last_img read more

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8 unconventional ways to master your credit union’s tech

first_imgThe decision to invest in new credit union technology is not made lightly. There are many factors involved, not the least to be considered are cost, compatibility, and anticipated gains from tech provided efficiencies. Take for example the Efficiency Ratio often referenced as a measure of credit union success… Technology plays a huge role in driving that number. But what good is it to invest in technology if your employees can’t use it to its fullest potential? What can you do to ensure your investment is optimized? Sitting through vendor presentations and reviewing slides only goes so far. There’s a certain amount understanding and knowledge that can really only be gained from practical, hands-on use. Once your employees reach a comfort level with the basics of your credit union core processing software, what else can be done to encourage them to dig deeper and to further maximize your tech investment? Here are some ideas to help build on that knowledge and get them thinking out of the box… or at least out of the classroom.Join User Groups – User groups are a great tool and often overlooked as a source of information. Just about everyone has Googled the occasional IT question and found answers in a forum. Joining a user group for your specific technology platform not only provides another resource for troubleshooting answers but can make you aware of potential problems, provide workarounds or solutions, learn about best practices and also provide a network of contacts in your area. 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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