Bees Win Opener In Albuquerque

first_img Tags: PCL/Salt Lake Bees The Bees crushed the Albuquerque Isotopes 11-4 in a road game yesterday to open the season.  Jose Briceno notched a grand slam and finished with six RBI for the Bees.  Written by Tonight is the second of a five-game series in Albuquerque.  The home opener for Salt Lake is Tuesday against Fresno. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail (Albuquerque, NM)  —  The Salt Lake Bees are off to a winning start in 2019.  April 5, 2019 /Sports News – Local Bees Win Opener In Albuquerque Robert Lovelllast_img

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UK: HMS Kent to Honor Channel Dash Heroes

first_img Share this article View post tag: Kent September 19, 2012 Training & Education UK: HMS Kent to Honor Channel Dash Heroes View post tag: HMS View post tag: Dashcenter_img Back to overview,Home naval-today UK: HMS Kent to Honor Channel Dash Heroes View post tag: Honor A memorial to the heroes of the Channel Dash – a brave but forlorn attempt to stop German ships breaking through into the North Sea in 1942 – will be dedicated in Dover on Saturday. The memorial unveiling, attended by First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Mark Stanhope, coincides with a three-day visit to the port by her affiliated warship, HMS Kent.Sailors past and present will salute arguably the bravest act in 103 years of naval aviation when a memorial to the heroes of the Channel Dash is dedicated this weekend in Dover.HMS Kent and First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Mark Stanhope will lead tributes by the present-day Royal Navy, while a fly-past from a vintage Swordfish torpedo bomber of the RN Historic Flight is planned at 1pm on Saturday (weather permitting).The monument to be unveiled champions the deeds of sailors and airmen who set out against the odds in February 1942 to prevent the breakthrough of German battle-cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, plus the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, from Brest to the North Sea.They paid a fearful price for their efforts to stop that breakthrough – known to the British as Operation Fuller, to the Germans as Operation Cerberus and to history as the Channel Dash.The three German ships were shielded by nearly 300 fighters and bombers, while the British response was poorly co-ordinated – much of the fighter cover promised the six Swordfish of 825 Naval Air Squadron failed to materialise.Despite that lack of cover, Lt Cdr Eugene Esmonde – a veteran of the attack on the Bismarck nine months earlier – led his sluggish torpedo bombers in to sink the ships.Although some got torpedoes away, none hit the ships, all the Swordfish were downed and only five of the 18 crew were rescued. Esmonde was not among them; he received a posthumous Victoria Cross.The deeds of the aircrew received praise from both sides – Admiral Bertram Ramsay, the Commander-in-Chief at Dover, called it “one of the finest exhibitions of self-sacrifice and devotion to duty the war had ever witnessed”; the German breakout commander Otto Ciliax said the Swordfish crews’ bravery surpassed “any other action by either side that day”.Motor torpedo boats based in Dover and half a dozen Royal Navy destroyers also tried to intercept the German force, but their torpedo salvo missed – and the response from the enemy guns badly damaged HMS Worcester which was set ablaze; 24 men aboard her were killed.In addition shore batteries of the Royal Artillery and RAF fighters and bombers attempted to stop the Germans’ progress.A granite memorial to all those Britons involved in Operation Fuller has been erected in Marine Parade Gardens in Dover.Sailors from Kent will provide a Guard of Honour as part of the parade being held to mark the unveiling.The ceremony coincides with a three-day visit by the Portsmouth-based frigate to her affiliated county.She’s due to berth at Prince of Wales Pier in Dover at mid-day on Friday and will remain there till Monday afternoon.The warship’s gangway will be open to the Dover public from 9.30am-12 noon and 3-5pm on Saturday.On Sunday, some of the ship’s company will head to Sittingbourne where they will visit Demelza House, the ship’s affiliated charity, and meet both staff and children to hear more about the work carried out by the hospice.Whilst there they will help redevelop part of the hospice to make it a more pleasant environment for residents and their families.The frigate will also be hosting various groups and youth organisations, including Sea Cadets from Sheerness and Tunbridge Wells, who will be given tours.And a friendly football match will be played between the ships XI and Icklesham United.Further group visits will be conducted on Monday before the ship departs Dover port at 3pm.“I am delighted to be bringing HMS Kent back to her home county,” said Cdr Ben Ripley, HMS Kent’s Commanding Officer.“My ship’s company are pleased to be able to provide a Guard of Honour for the Channel Dash Memorial, dedicated to the memories of the extraordinarily brave men who flew their Swordfish aircraft to the heart of the enemy with little regard for their own safety.“By contrast to this very poignant ceremony, on the very same day, I am looking forward to welcoming the people of Kent onboard and hope that as many as possible will come along and find out more about HMS Kent and life in the modern Royal Navy.“We always receive a great welcome and fantastic hospitality when we visit Kent and I thoroughly look forward to further strengthening our treasured links with the county.”[mappress]Naval Today Staff, September 19, 2012; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: Heroes View post tag: Channellast_img read more

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Detailed guide: North of England: local restrictions

first_img PDF, 262KB, 32 pages This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. PDF, 369KB, 26 pages If you’re in a support bubbleIf you are eligible to form a support bubble, you and your support bubble count as one household towards the limit of 2 households when meeting others outdoors. This means, for example, that you and your support bubble can meet with another household, even if the group is more than 6 people.Where you can meetYou can meet in a group of 6 or a larger group of any size from up to 2 households (including their support bubbles) outdoors. This includes private outdoor spaces, such as gardens, and other outdoor public places and venues that are open. These include the following: in a group of up to 6 from any number of households (children of all ages count towards the limit of 6) in a group of any size from up to two households (each household can include an existing support bubble, if eligible) (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Slovak) Request an accessible format. This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. You can also provide care or assistance for disabled or vulnerable people inside someone’s home, where necessary. However, you must only meet indoors or in a larger group where it is reasonably necessary to provide care or assistance. This means you cannot meet socially indoors with someone who is vulnerable unless they are in your household or support bubble, or another exemption applies.You should follow the guidance on how to stop the spread of coronavirus at all times. There is further guidance for those who provide unpaid care to friends or family.Support groupsSupport groups that have to be delivered in person can continue with up to 15 participants where officially organised to provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support. Support groups must be organised by a business, charity or public body and must not take place in a private home or garden. All participants should maintain social distancing. Examples of support groups include those that provide support to: on your own in a group of up to 6 people in a larger group of any size from up to 2 households (and their support bubbles, if eligible) You can only use a childcare bubble for childcare and cannot use it to mix with another household for any other reason (for example to socialise). You have to meet certain eligibility rules to form a childcare bubble. See the separate guidance on childcare bubbles.Parent and child groupsParent and child groups can take place indoors as well as outdoors (but not in private homes or gardens) if they are for the benefit of children aged under 5 and organised by a business, charity or public body. This includes groups that are primarily focused on social and developmental activities.Parent and child groups must be limited to no more than 15 people. Children under five and anyone working or volunteering as part of the group, such as a group leader, are not counted in this number.Support groups which provide support functions for parents, carers, or their childrenSupport groups which provide support functions for parents, carers, or their children, such as breastfeeding or postnatal groups, which have to be delivered in person may continue to meet indoors, but must follow the same rules as other support groups. See the support groups section of this guidance.Providing care or assistanceYou can continue to gather in larger groups or meet indoors where this is reasonably necessary: disability sport sports with your household or support bubble sports as part of the curriculum in education supervised sport and physical activity for under-18s (including those who were under 18 on 31 August 2020), this should be limited to 15 participants walk or cycle where possible you must not share a car with anyone from outside your household or your support bubble, unless your journey is made for an exempt reason plan ahead and avoid busy times and routes on public transport regularly wash or sanitise your hands wear a face covering on public transport, unless you’re exempt stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings or increasing ventilation indoors) non-essential retail can reopen personal care services such as hairdressers and nail salons can reopen, including those provided from a mobile setting public buildings such as libraries and community centres can reopen outdoor hospitality venues can reopen, with table service only most outdoor attractions including zoos, theme parks, and drive-in performances (such as cinemas and concerts) can reopen some smaller outdoor events such as fetes, literary fairs, and fairgrounds can take place indoor leisure and sports facilities can reopen for individual exercise, or exercise with your household or support bubble all childcare and supervised activities are allowed indoors (as well as outdoors) for all children. Parent and child groups can take place indoors (as well as outdoors) for up to 15 people (children under 5 will not be counted in this number) weddings, civil partnership ceremonies, wakes and other commemorative events can take place for up to 15 people (anyone working is not included in this limit), including in indoor venues that are permitted to open or where an exemption applies. Wedding receptions can also take place for up to 15 people, but must take place outdoors, not including private gardens self-contained accommodation can stay open for overnight stays in England with your household or support bubble care home residents will be able to nominate two named individuals for regular indoor visits (following a rapid lateral flow test) you should continue to work from home if you can and minimise the amount that you travel where possible for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children, see further information on education and childcare for arrangements where children do not live in the same household as both their parents or guardians to allow contact between birth parents and children in care, as well as between siblings in care for prospective adopting parents to meet a child or children who may be placed with them to place or facilitate the placing of a child or children in the care of another by social services for the purpose of managing childcare through a childcare bubble to visit people in your support bubble (if you are legally permitted to form one) to provide informal childcare for children aged 13 or under as part of a childcare bubble (for example, to enable parents to work, not to enable socialising between adults) to provide emergency assistance to go to a support group of up to 15 participants, the limit of 15 does not include children under 5 who are accompanying a parent or guardian for respite care where that care is being provided to a vulnerable person or a disabled person, or is a short break in respect of a looked-after child to provide care or assistance for disabled or vulnerable people, including shopping for essential items and accessing services on their behalf The following types of tests will restart: PDF, 331KB, 33 pages You should follow the guidance: (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (easy read) PDF, 282KB, 33 pages (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Gujarati) Additional exemptionsThere are further reasonable excuses. For example, you may gather in larger groups or meet indoors: You should follow the guidance on working in other people’s homes.Where a work meeting does not need to take place in a private home or garden, it should not.If you are clinically extremely vulnerable or live with someone who is clinically extremely vulnerableIf you have been identified as clinically extremely vulnerable then you should continue to work from home where possible. If you cannot work from home, you can go to your workplace. Your employer is required to take steps to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace and should be able to explain to you the measures they have put in place to keep you safe at work. Some employers may introduce regular testing of employees as part of these measures. You may also want to consider how you get to and from work, for example, if it is possible to avoid using public transport during rush hour.If you live with someone who is clinically extremely vulnerable then you can continue to go to work if you are unable to work from home.You should follow the guidance on how to stop the spread of coronavirus, including what to do to reduce your risk of catching or passing on the virus at home.If you are worried about going in to work or you cannot workThere is guidance if you need to self-isolate or cannot go to work due to coronavirus and what to do if you’re employed and cannot work.Citizens Advice has advice if you’re worried about working, including what to do if you think your workplace is not safe, or if you live with someone vulnerable.Support is available if you cannot work, for example if you need to care for someone or you have less work.There is further advice for employers and employees from ACAS (the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service).Going to school or collegeSchool pupils and students in further education should go to school and college.All schools, colleges and other further education settings are open for face-to-face teaching during term time. It remains very important for children and young people to attend, to support their wellbeing and education and to help working parents and guardians.Clinically extremely vulnerable pupils and students should go to school or college.There is further guidance on what parents need to know about early years providers, schools and colleges during COVID-19.Rapid lateral flow testing is now available for free for everyone in England. It is recommended for all secondary school pupils and college students, their families and all school and college staff.See the guidance on how you can get regular rapid tests if you do not have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19).Universities and higher educationStudents in university and other higher education settings undertaking practical and practice based courses who require specialist equipment and facilities can go to in-person teaching and learning where reasonably necessary. Providers should not ask students to return if their course can reasonably be continued online.All other students should continue to learn remotely and remain where they’re living until in-person teaching starts again, wherever possible. Following a review, the government has announced that in-person teaching and learning should resume for all students alongside Step 3, which will take place no earlier than 17 May.Students who have returned to higher education settings, including university, should not move back and forward between their permanent home and student home during term time, unless they meet one of the exemptions.Higher education students who have moved to university accommodation will be able to return to a non-term residence before 29 April 2021, if they wish to. This will allow university students to return to a family or other address for the holidays. However, in order to minimise the risk of spreading COVID-19, students should remain in their term time accommodation where possible, especially those students who returned to campus from 8 March. Students should take a test before they travel.There is guidance for universities and students starting and returning to higher education.Students should follow the guidance on how to stop the spread of COVID-19 at all times.ChildcareAll children can go to registered childcare, childminders, wraparound care and other supervised children’s activities indoors and outdoors.Parent and child groups can take place indoors as well as outdoors, with restrictions on numbers attending. See the parent and child groups section of this guidance.Meeting others for childcarePeople can continue to gather indoors or in larger groups outdoors where this is reasonably necessary: Keeping yourself and others safeSocial distancing is still very important. You should stay 2 metres apart from anyone who is not in your household or support bubble where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings) if you cannot stay 2 metres apart.You should follow the guidance on how to stop the spread of coronavirus at all times, including if you have been vaccinated against COVID-19.You should follow this guidance in full to limit spreading COVID-19. It is underpinned by law.Face coveringsYou must wear a face covering in many indoor settings, such as shops and places of worship, and on public transport, unless you are exempt or have a reasonable excuse. This is the law. Read guidance on face coverings.If you are clinically extremely vulnerableIf you are clinically extremely vulnerable, you could be at higher risk of severe illness from coronavirus.If you are clinically extremely vulnerable, you are no longer advised to shield. However, you should continue to follow the guidance for people who are clinically extremely vulnerable and are advised to continue taking extra precautions to protect yourself. It is important that you continue to keep the number of social interactions that you have low and try to limit the amount of time you spend in settings where it is difficult to maintain social distancing.If you have been vaccinated against COVID-19To help protect yourself and your friends, family, and community you should continue to follow all of the guidance on this page even if you’ve been vaccinated against COVID-19.The vaccines have been shown to reduce the likelihood of severe illness in most people. Like all medicines, no vaccine is completely effective, so those who have received the vaccine should continue to take recommended precautions to avoid infection.We do not know by how much the vaccine stops COVID-19 from spreading. Even if you have been vaccinated, you could still spread COVID-19 to others.Asymptomatic testingRapid lateral flow testing is now available free to anybody without symptoms. You can get your tests from pharmacies, testing sites, employers, schools, colleges and universities.Find out more about how to get rapid lateral flow testsTesting twice a week will help make sure you don’t have COVID-19, reducing the risk to those around you.If you have symptoms you should continue to get a PCR test. If you’re not sure, you can find out which coronavirus test you should get.Meeting family and friends indoorsYou must not meet indoors with anybody you do not live with, unless you have formed a support bubble with them (if you are eligible), or another legal exemption applies.Meeting friends and family outdoors (rule of 6)You can meet up outdoors with friends and family you do not live with, either: kitchens sleeping areas bathrooms indoor communal areas such as lounges, sitting areas and any lifts, staircases or internal corridors for entry and exit into the accommodation (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Arabic) visit someone who is dying visit someone in a care home (if permitted under care home guidance), hospital or hospice to accompany a family member or close friend to a medical appointment. The limit of 15 does not include children under 5 who are accompanying a parent or guardian. Gatherings above the limit can take place where reasonably necessary for work or volunteering. Where a group includes someone covered by an exception (for example, someone who is working or volunteering to facilitate the group), they are not generally counted as part of the gatherings limit.Exercise, sport and physical activityYou can do unlimited exercise outdoors but there are limits on the number of people you can exercise with. It can be either: theory tests motorcycle tests LGV driving tests car and trailer driving tests (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Punjabi Shahmukhi) PDF, 300KB, 36 pages Further guidance on hotels and other guest accommodation is available for self-contained holiday accommodation that is able to reopen.A full list of reasons can be found in the guidance on closing certain businesses and venues in England.Travelling within EnglandYou should continue to minimise the amount you travel where possible. This means you should avoid making unnecessary trips and combine trips where possible.If you need to travel: victims of crime (including domestic abuse) those with, or recovering from, addictions (including alcohol, narcotics or other substance addictions) or addictive patterns of behaviour those with, or caring for people with, any long-term illness or terminal condition or who are vulnerable (including those with a mental health condition) those facing issues related to their sexuality or identity (including those living as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender) those who have suffered bereavement vulnerable young people (including to enable them to meet youth workers) disabled people and their carers The NHS continues to carry out urgent and non-urgent services safely. It is vital anyone who thinks they need any kind of medical care comes forward and gets help.The majority of public services will continue. These include: PDF, 328KB, 32 pages to fulfil legal obligations to carry out activities related to buying, selling or moving house for the purpose of COVID-secure protests or picketing where the organiser has taken the required precautions, including completing a risk assessment where it is reasonably necessary to support voting in an election or referendum (such as vote counting or for legal observers). Large print, easy read and translations parks, beaches, countryside accessible to the public, forests public and botanical gardens the grounds of a heritage site outdoor sculpture parks allotments public playgrounds outdoor sports venues and facilities outdoor hospitality venues outdoor attractions (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Somali) Request an accessible format. If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need aversion of this document in a more accessible format, please email [email protected] tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Those who are campaigning for a specific outcome in elections or referendums can carry out door-to-door campaigning activity in accordance with guidance on elections and referendums during COVID-19.You can gather in larger groups or meet indoors for gatherings within criminal justice accommodation or immigration detention centres.If you break the rulesThe police can take action against you if you meet in larger groups. This includes breaking up illegal gatherings and issuing fines (fixed penalty notices).You can be given a fixed penalty notice of £200 for the first offence, doubling for further offences up to a maximum of £6,400.You can be fined £800 if you go to a private indoor gathering such as a house party of over 15 people from outside your household, which will double for each repeat offence to a maximum level of £6,400.If you hold, or are involved in holding, an illegal gathering of over 30 people, the police can fine you £10,000.Care home visitsYou should check the guidance on visiting care homes during COVID-19 to find out how visits should be conducted. Residents must follow the national restrictions if they are having a visit out of the care home.There is separate guidance for people in supported living.Staying away from home overnightYou can stay overnight in a campsite, caravan, boat, second home, or other self-contained accommodation. This should only be with your household or support bubble. You must not stay overnight with anyone not in your household or support bubble, unless a legal exemption applies.Self-contained holiday accommodation may reopen. This is accommodation in which facilities are restricted to exclusive use of a single household/support bubble. Such facilities include: Jobcentre Plus sites courts and probation services civil registrations offices passport and visa services services provided to victims of crime waste or recycling centres getting an MOT Elite sportspeopleElite sportspeople (or those on an official elite sports pathway) can meet in larger groups or meet indoors to compete and train. They can be joined by their coaches if necessary, or their parents and guardians if they’re under 18.Funerals and linked commemorative eventsFunerals are allowed with limits on attendance, and must only take place in COVID-secure venues or in public outdoor places. The venue manager or event organiser must take the required precautions, including the completion of a risk assessment.Funerals can be attended by a maximum of 30 people and may take place indoors. Linked religious or belief-based commemorative events, such as wakes, stone settings and ash scatterings can also continue with up to 15 people in attendance.Anyone working is not counted in these limits. Social distancing should be maintained between people who do not live together or share a support bubble.There is guidance for arranging or going to a funeral during the coronavirus pandemic.Weddings and civil partnership ceremonies and receptionsNo more than 15 people (of any age) can be at a wedding, civil partnership ceremony or reception. Anyone working is not counted in these limits. Social distancing should be maintained between people who do not live together or share a support bubble.There is further guidance for small marriages and civil partnerships.Places of worshipYou can go to places of worship for a service. When a service is taking place indoors you must not mingle with anyone outside of your household or support bubble. You should maintain social distancing at all times, staying 2 metres apart from anyone who is not in your household or support bubble.When a service is taking place outdoors, you must not mingle in groups larger than 6, except for groups from up to 2 households (a household can include an existing support bubble, if eligible). You should maintain strict social distancing from other groups and households at all times.You should follow the national guidance on the safe use of places of worship.Volunteering and charitable servicesYou can gather above the limit of 6 people or 2 households, or gather indoors, where this is reasonably necessary in order to provide voluntary or charitable services.You should follow the guidance on Volunteering during coronavirus (COVID-19).Other circumstances where you can gather in groups of more than six people or two householdsMaternityYou can be indoors with someone who is giving birth or receiving treatment in hospital. You should check the relevant hospital’s visiting policies. There is further NHS guidance on pregnancy and coronavirus.Avoiding injury or harmYou can gather in larger groups or indoors to provide emergency assistance, and to avoid injury or illness, or to escape a risk of harm (including domestic abuse).Compassionate visitsYou can gather in larger groups or indoors, with people outside your household or support bubble, to: on recreational team sport on outdoor sport and recreation in England for providers of grassroots sports and gym and leisure facilities (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (large print) dental services opticians audiology services chiropody chiropractors osteopaths other medical or health services, including services relating to mental health (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Welsh) PDF, 348KB, 36 pages If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need aversion of this document in a more accessible format, please email [email protected] tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Urdu) (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Hindi) (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Bengali) Find out more about the red list travel ban countriesEveryone allowed to enter England who has visited or passed through a country where travel to the UK has been banned in the last 10 days must: a British national an Irish national anyone with residence rights in the UK PDF, 9MB, 49 pages quarantine for 10 days in a managed quarantine hotel take a coronavirus (COVID-19) test on or before day 2 and on or after day 8 of quarantining, the tests are included in the hotel package follow the guidance on this page car driving lessons car and trailer driving lessons large goods vehicle (LGV) training driving instructor training 12 April: What’s changedSome of the rules on what you can and cannot changed on 12 April. However, many restrictions remain in place. You must not socialise indoors with anyone you do not live with, unless you have formed a support bubble with them, or another exemption applies. You should continue to work from home if you can and minimise the number of journeys you make where possible. You should get a test and follow the stay at home guidance if you have COVID-19 symptoms.You can read the ‘COVID-19 Response – Spring 2021’ (the roadmap) for more information on how COVID-19 restrictions will be eased in England. It is underpinned by law.From 12 April: PDF, 341KB, 32 pages PDF, 235KB, 35 pages If you need to enter through a house to get to a garden or other outside space and there is no alternative access, you should wear a face covering, wash or sanitise your hands when entering, and then go straight to the outside space. If you need to use the bathroom, wash your hands thoroughly and go back outside immediately. You should maintain social distancing from anyone who is not in your household or support bubble, and hosts should follow fresh air (ventilation) guidance.When you can meet with more people or meet indoorsGatherings above the limit of 6 people or 2 households outdoors, or any gatherings indoors, can only take place if they are permitted by an exemption. These exemptions are listed on this page.This means, for example, a tradesperson can go into a household without breaking the limit if they are there for work, and the officiant at a wedding would not count towards the limit.Support and childcare bubblesYou have to meet certain eligibility rules to form a support or childcare bubble. This means not everyone will be able to form a bubble. See the separate guidance on support bubbles and childcare bubbles.You can only use a childcare bubble for childcare. You cannot use a childcare bubble to mix with another household for any other reason. This means you cannot use a childcare bubble to meet socially with another household.Going to workYou should continue to work from home where you can.If you cannot work from home you should continue to travel to your workplace. You do not need to be classed as a critical worker to go to work if you cannot work from home.Employers and employees should discuss their working arrangements, and employers should take every possible step to facilitate their employees working from home, including providing suitable IT and equipment to enable remote working. Where people cannot work from home, employers should take steps to make their workplaces COVID-19 secure and help employees avoid busy times and routes on public transport. Extra consideration should be given to those people at higher risk.COVID-secure guidelines are available for sectors across the economy to substantially reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19.See guidance for reopening businesses and venuesMeeting others for workYou can gather in larger groups or meet indoors where it is necessary for your work. This does not include social gatherings with work colleagues.Working in other people’s homesWhere it is reasonably necessary for you to work in other people’s homes you can continue to do so, for example if you’re a: (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Punjabi Gurmukhi) PDF, 346KB, 32 pages (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Farsi) PDF, 373KB, 36 pages (COVID-19) Coronavirus restrictions: what you can and cannot do (Polish) See the guidance on booking and staying in a quarantine hotel when you arrive in EnglandAdvice for visitors and foreign nationals in EnglandForeign nationals are subject to the national restrictions.If you are visiting the UK, you may return home. You should check whether there are any restrictions in place at your destination.Moving homeYou can still move home. People outside your household or support bubble should not help with moving house unless reasonably necessary.Estate and letting agents and removals firms can continue to work. If you are looking to move, you can go to property viewings.Follow the national guidance on moving home safely, which includes advice on social distancing, letting fresh air in, and wearing a face covering.Financial supportWherever you live, you may be able to get financial help.See further information on business support and financial support if you’re off work because of coronavirus.Businesses and venuesTo reduce social contact, some businesses must remain closed or follow restrictions on how they provide goods and services. You can read the full list of businesses required to remain closed in England.There is further guidance on reopening businesses and venues which explains which business will be permitted to open at each step of the roadmap.From 12 April, further venues will be permitted to open. Unless a specific exemption exists, you must only visit these as a single household or bubble indoors, or in a group of 6 people or 2 households outdoors.Outdoor areas at hospitality venues (cafes, restaurants, bars, pubs, social clubs, including in members’ clubs) can reopen. Hospitality venues can also provide takeaway alcohol. These venues may allow customers to use an inside bathroom and customers can order and pay indoors. At any premises serving alcohol, customers will be required to order, be served and eat/drink while seated (“table service”). Venues will be prohibited from providing smoking equipment such as shisha pipes, for use on the premises.Outdoor attractions at venues such as animal attractions, theme parks, and skating rinks will also be permitted to reopen. A full list can be found here. This does not include outdoor cinemas and theatres, which will be limited to drive-in performances only. When going to these events, you must not share your vehicle with anyone outside your household or support bubble, unless there is an exemption, such as for providing care to a vulnerable person or for work purposes.Businesses which are allowed to re-open that operate in otherwise closed attractions (such as a gift shop or a takeaway kiosk at an indoor museum) may only open where they are a self-contained unit and can be accessed directly from the street.Personal care services (including those provided from a mobile setting), indoor sports facilities, self-contained accommodation, and public buildings (such as community centres) may also reopen.Businesses eligible to host childcare and supervised activities for children will now be able to host these activities (including sport) for all children, regardless of circumstances.Healthcare and public servicesThe NHS and medical services remain open, including: PDF, 365KB, 38 pages Driving lessons and learning to driveDriving tests and driving lessons may resume. Further guidance on learning to drive during coronavirus is available.You will be able to restart: PDF, 328KB, 29 pages You must follow the social contact rules when travelling in private vehicles. This means you must not share enclosed private vehicles with anyone from outside your household or your support bubble, unless an exemption exists, such as you are sharing the vehicle with someone working (e.g. a taxi). Where a vehicle is open air, you must follow the outdoor gathering limits.There is additional guidance on safer travel, including on the safe use of public transport.Travelling within the UK, the Republic of Ireland and the Channel IslandsTravelling to EnglandAcross the different parts of the Common Travel Area (the UK, the Republic of Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man), there may be rules in place that restrict travel to England.You should check the restrictions in place where you intend to travel from before making arrangements to travel.Provided you are permitted to travel from another part of the Common Travel Area (the UK, the Republic of Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man), you may enter England and are not required to quarantine on arrival. If you do travel to England, you must follow the restrictions on what you can and cannot do.Travelling from EnglandAcross the different parts of the Common Travel Area (the UK, the Republic of Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man), there may be rules in place that restrict travel from England. You do not need a reasonable excuse to leave England to travel to other parts of the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man or the Republic of Ireland. You should check the restrictions in place where you intend to travel to before making arrangements to travel.Travelling to or from Northern IrelandCurrently in Northern Ireland it is against the law to leave home without a reasonable excuse. Those arriving into Northern Ireland from another part of the Common Travel Area are asked to self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival. There are a number of exemptions to this request.Travelling to or from ScotlandNon-essential travel between Scotland and the rest of the UK, and the wider Common Travel Area, remains restricted. This means it is illegal to enter or leave Scotland unless you have a reasonable excuse. Travelling for a holiday is not a reasonable excuse. The guidance provides advice on reasonable excuses to travel to and from Scotland.Travelling to or from WalesThere are no restrictions in place for travel into or out of Wales as long as you are travelling within the UK or wider Common Travel Area (the Republic of Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man). Across the different parts of the Common Travel Area, there may be rules in place that restrict travel from Wales. You do not need a reasonable excuse to leave Wales to travel to other parts of the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man or the Republic of Ireland. You should check the restrictions in place where you intend to travel to before making arrangements to travel. The guidance provides advice on travelling to and from Wales.International travelTravelling internationally from EnglandYou can only travel internationally from England where you have a reasonable excuse to leave the UK, such as work. International holidays are not permitted.Some jobs qualify for exemptions for certain travel related requirements, such as self isolation and testing. See guidance on which jobs and circumstances qualify for travel exemptions.If you do need to travel overseas (and have a reasonable excuse to do so), you are required to complete a mandatory outbound ‘Declaration to Travel’ form unless an exemption applies to you. You must state your reasons for travel on the form before leaving the UK.You should also consider the public health advice in the country you are visiting. You should look at the rules in place at your destination and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) travel advice. You should do this even if you are returning to a place you’ve visited before.Travelling to England from outside the UKAll visitors to England are subject to the coronavirus restriction rules.People planning to travel to England should follow the guidance on entering the UK. Before travelling to the UK, you must complete a passenger locator form and have proof of a negative COVID-19 test result, unless you are exempt.All arrivals will need to take a coronavirus (COVID-19) test on day 2 and day 8 of quarantining. Arrivals must book a travel test package. See the guidance on how to quarantine when you arrive in England.You cannot travel to the UK if you’ve visited or passed through a country where travel to the UK has been banned in the last 10 days, unless you’re: You can also take part in formally organised outdoor sports or licensed physical activity with any number of people. This must be organised by a business, charity or public body and the organiser must take the required precautions, including the completion of a risk assessment. You should avoid contact in training and, for some sports, avoid contact in all activities. Read the guidance on what avoiding contact means for your sport.Indoor leisure facilities may open for you to exercise on your own, or with your household or support bubble.You must not meet indoors for sport, except for: nanny cleaner tradesperson social care worker providing support to children and familieslast_img read more

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Senior Jared Dourdeville receives 2010 SAME Award

first_imgOn behalf of the New York City Post of the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME), Harvard College senior Jared Dourdeville ’11 has been awarded the 2010 Colonel and Mrs. S.S. Dennis III Scholarship in recognition of his hard work and dedication to research.During the SEAS All Hands meeting held on April 29, Cherry A. Murray, dean of the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), presented Dourdeville with a certificate of accomplishment and a scholarship check for $1,000 from SAME.The organization has nearly 22,500 members and is dedicated to advancing individual technical knowledge and the collective engineering capabilities of governments, the uniformed services, and private industry in the interest of national defense.Dourdeville is an engineering sciences concentrator pursuing the mechanical and materials track.Hailing from Marion, Massachusetts, he is a member of the men’s lightweight crew team and was named to the spring 2010 Academy All-Ivy League Team.Dourdeville lives in Pforzheimer House.last_img read more

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Doctors, hospitals increasing use of electronic health records

first_img Read Full Story Hospitals nearly tripled their use of electronic health records (EHR) systems between 2010 and 2012, according to a new study co-authored by Ashish Jha of Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). The authors found that 44% of hospitals report having at least a basic EHR system.“Given the size of our country, that’s amazing progress in a very short time period,” said Jha, HSPH professor of health policy and management, in a July 8, 2013 HealthDay article.The study was one of three co-authored by Jha on the latest trends in health information technology (IT) adoption among U.S. health care providers and hospitals. Supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as a companion to its annual health IT report, the articles were published online July 9, 2013 in Health Affairs. Jha was one of several panelists speaking about the studies’ findings at a Health Affairs press briefing in Washington, D.C., on July 9.last_img read more

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Look Before You Leap: The Importance of a Comprehensive AI Strategy

first_imgArtificial Intelligence is everywhere, but it’s critical for companies to take the time to research, analyze, and develop a strategic plan before deploying AI initiatives.Well it seems this artificial intelligence thing has caught on after all, and looks like it’s here to stay. AI is already used across most industries and shows no signs of slowing down. It’s a rapidly growing technology that will impact nearly every product and business process over the next decade.Even late adopters are ready to embrace it, because it’s clear that AI, along with its machine learning (ML) and deep learning (DL), is reshaping the way we do business. AI can help organizations reach their targeted business outcomes by:Increasing efficiency of internal applicationsImproving customer experienceIncreasing lead generation and customer acquisitionAutomating business and HR operationsImproving ROIOf course, with all the cool and exciting things AI can do, it’s temping for businesses to jump in and get started right away. That eagerness can be a good thing, but deploying AI without preparation can lead to a wide range of problems. As with most new business applications, it’s critical to analyze and think through your IT Transformation strategy first. Carefully research when and where it makes sense to use AI, so that you can be most effective and cost efficient in the long run.IT leaders need to consider questions like:What projects make the most sense for our business and goals?What applications will give us the best ROI (both in the short and long-term)?What kind of shape is our current data in, and do we have the right data management technology?Do we have the proper infrastructure hardware to scale?Do we have the skills to implement AI initiatives? If not, should we train our current staff or hire new? Or both?How will we communicate across all our lines of business?The problem is that too many companies, excited about the benefits of AI, cannonball in without a strategic plan. The want to make a big splash, but forget to check that there is water in the pool first.Don’t be them.Just as you have to crawl before you can run, you have to start small with AI. It’s best to dip your toes in the water and Once you have some initial success and a solid strategy in place, you can move on to more extensive applications.Whether your organization has already embraced AI or plans to adopt it soon, consider the following before you go any further: Evaluate Current Challenges and OpportunitiesTake the time to research and evaluate your current opportunities. Chances are, there are multiple areas of your organization that can benefit from AI and ML. The different lines of business might be clamoring to get started, but it’s critical to do the research up front to ensure that your IT strategy aligns with your overall company objectives.Prioritize Your ListAfter you’ve gathered the data, you’ll need to prioritize projects based on the scope, potential risks and ROI. This is often easier said than done, because different departments will have different priorities. It’s up to you as an IT leader to manage this and make recommendations based on the company’s best interests.Examine Your Organization’s Current DataWhat shape is your company’s data in? Again, be realistic in your current state (not in where you hope to be), so that you don’t get in over your head. You can always start small, perhaps using your Big Data analytics to deploy one or two ML applications. Measure the ROI of those initial projects, using the data to develop recommendations for future applications.Focus on StaffingAI initiatives require a different skill set. Automating operations can free up your staff to do other things, but you may find that they don’t have the right skills. You’ll need engineers and data scientists to manage the applications and analyze the data. Will you retrain current staff or recruit new employees? Or a mix of both? Now is the time to think about and budget for these staffing issues.To succeed with AI initiatives, it’s critical that organizations have a comprehensive and prioritized execution strategy in place. Doing so will allow you to deploy the right technology and IT infrastructure for each specified use-case.For additional information on how IT leaders can ensure successful ML and DL projects check out The Artificial Intelligence Starter Guide for IT Leaders.  This white paper by Moor Insights & Strategy also covers Dell EMC’s hardware for classical machine learning, hardware for deep learning, pre-configured “Ready Bundles,” enterprise cloud services, and our consulting and training services.last_img read more

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It’s Confirmed! James Corden Will Host CBS’ The Late Late Show

first_img James Corden View Comments Corden, who stars as the Baker in the upcoming Into the Woods film adaptation, earned a Tony for his portrayal of Francis Henshall in One Man, Two Guvnors after originating the role in London. He also appeared in The History Boys on Broadway and in the West End. In addition to Into the Woods, Corden’s screen credits include One Chance, in which he played Britain’s Got Talent sensation Paul Potts, Begin Again, The Three Musketeers, Gulliver’s Travels, The Gruffalo, Gavin & Stacey and Horne & Corden. This is somewhat bittersweet news for the Great White Way. Corden had recently been in negotiation to star as Pseudolus in a Broadway revival of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. With Corden now unavailable, a spokesperson for the musical, Chris Boneau said: “Despite the total commitment from Stephen Sondheim, our director, Alex Timbers and our entire creative team…we have decided to postpone the production this season.” The show has thus released the Nederlander theater that was on hold for the tuner.center_img Star Files It’s official! The previously reported speculation is true and James Corden will take over as host of CBS’ The Late Late Show in 2015. According to TVLine.com the Tony winner will succeed Craig Ferguson when he steps down from the gig in December. No word yet on where the show will be made.last_img read more

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Brian Gilligan on Unleashing His Inner James Brown in The Commitments

first_img The idea of this white Dublin community coming together to honor the best of black American soul is such a great one. It’s very me, as well. My mum was a huge, huge Motown and soul fan and the first record I ever bought was a double CD of James Brown’s greatest hits. He’s the one I like to embody every time I go out on stage, but when I was a teenager I also listened to a lot of classic rock music from all sorts of people—Led Zeppelin, Whitesnake, Thin Lizzy, groups like that. View Comments Presumably your upgrade within the cast has included a change in dressing room? It has. I was originally sharing with three guys who are brilliant—absolutely fantastic—and to find myself now sitting in my own dressing room is like, I don’t know what hit me! I have all this space, all this room, and it kind of feels like I’m in the middle of a ballpark. I’m still trying to get used to it! You were in the musical when it first opened—how did you work your way up to a leading role? It’s a pretty good story: I went from being third cover to leading man while playing Billy, the drummer, along the way. Deco came about when [assistant director] CJ Ranger heard me in backstage in the theater stairwell one day wailing away. As a result, I was called in to cover Deco and was then asked if I would play [the part] for the next year. I gather this production gets some very, um, revved-up audiences? Well, there hasn’t been any underwear or contraband thrown on to the stage if that’s what you mean [laughs]. But I guess the fun thing about our audience is that some of them have never been to the theater before so they don’t necessarily know that there is a kind of etiquette and decorum that come with going to the theater—things like not shouting out mid-scene. And what’s great is that there is room for the audience to get up and treat it like a live concert. They’re not afraid of shouting or whooping. Your part as the Commitments’ lead singer Deco is one of the most vocally demanding on the West End. How are you pacing yourself? It is demanding, and as with everyone who takes on a role like this it’s about being aware at certain points of where you can take a step back while still delivering [the part] up for the audience. As singers we have to be quite protective of our instrument, but at the same time the part is so rewarding that you want to give it your all. Irish actor Brian Gilligan has been playing the defining role of Deco in the rock musical The Commitments at the Palace Theatre since September—meanwhile, the role’s originator, Killian Donnelly, has moved on to headline the U.K. premiere of Memphis a few streets away. Just a kid when the Alan Parker film was released in 1991, Gilligan has nonetheless had a lifelong affection for this story of a community of Dubliners who form a soul band with Deco as their take-no-prisoners lead singer. A charming musical theatre newcomer, Gilligan chatted with Broadway.com about rocking out six times a week and getting used to the novelty of having his own dressing room.center_img So each performance lets you unleash your inner diva? You could say that, yes [laughs]. He’s quite a formidable character: raucous and rude and gifted with an extraordinary voice. Yes. I would describe Deco as someone who knows exactly what he’s after in that he wants to be a superstar-singer and he sees [the group] as a massive chance for him to get out there. Deco almost considers himself to be the white James Brown; he’s a diva but he’s also very serious about what he does. Did you know the material itself well already—Roddy Doyle’s book or the Alan Parker film? I was born in 1987 so would have been only four when the film came out [in 1991] but when I was growing up the movie was part of the standard DVD/video diet for every young north Dubliner. It’s a story that everybody from my generation would have grown up with and would have quoted quite extensively. What’s it like for you and your Commitments castmates to have another Irish musical, Once, playing up the street? [Laughs] It’s been little Dublin for several years now ever since Once moved in and then The Commitments. It really has been great fun and we should take an awful lot of happiness in the fact that these stories from Glen Hansard and Roddy Doyle have made their way to the West End stage. You got to shadow the amazing Killian Donnelly in the role—did he give you any pointers when it was time for you to take over? Killian was great with his time from the very beginning. He told me to enjoy it, to go about it with a lot of pace and caution, not to burn myself out too quickly and just to have as much fun as I can. Oh, and he did say one thing: learn to guzzle water as quickly as you possibly can because it is one of those shows where either on or off stage, you are constantly sweating.last_img read more

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Food School.

first_imgProcessing-plant supervisors must meet rigid federal Good Manufacturing Practice requirements to assure the safety of low-acid or acidified canned foods. They can learn how in the University of Georgia Better Process Control School in Athens, Ga. The school, which covers the critical factors supervisors must know in these canning processes, will be March 7-10 at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education. The school is sponsored by the UGA Department of Food Science and Technology and the Food Process Research and Development Laboratory. The $500 fee covers training materials, supplies, refreshment breaks, three lunches, tuition and certificates. Preregistration is required. To learn more about the school, or to sign up, call Marian Wendinger at (706) 542-2574. Or e-mail her at [email protected]last_img read more

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