George VI Ice Shelf: past history, present behaviour and potential mechanisms for future collapse

first_imgGeorge VI Ice Shelf is the largest ice shelf on the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, covering a total area of 25 000 km2. The northern ice front of George VI Ice Shelf presently marks the southernmost occurrence of recent ice-shelf retreat on the Antarctic Peninsula and according to some predictions the ice shelf is close to its thermal limit of stability. If these predictions are accurate and we are witnessing the first stages of retreat then it is critical that we take the opportunity to examine the ice shelf in its pre-collapse phase. This paper provides a review of the geological evolution, glaciology and interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere. We also discuss the present behaviour of the ice shelf, in the context of recent retreat of its northern and southern ice fronts, and outline several possible mechanisms for future ice shelf collapse. What emerges from this review is that the stability of George VI Ice Shelf is sensitive not only to the recent rapid regional atmospheric warming on the Antarctic Peninsula which has led to the gradual retreat of the northern and southern ice shelf fronts, but also to changes in ocean circulation, particularly intrusions of warm Upper Circumpolar Deep Water onto the continental shelf. It is likely that any future change in the stability of George VI Ice Shelf will involve a combined atmospheric and oceanic forcing.last_img read more

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Dixie State’s Michael Sanders Named As RMAC Offensive Player of the Week

first_img Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailST. GEORGE, Utah-Monday, Dixie State quarterback Michael Sanders was named as the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Offensive Player of the Week for his record-setting performance Saturday.Despite the Trailblazers’ loss to Chadron State Saturday, Sanders, a redshirt senior out of Phoenix and Pinnacle High School, set a school record by tossing for a school-record 527 yards.His 39 completions on 60 pass attempts also tied a single-game school record.Sanders is also the first quarterback in the program’s NCAA Division II history to pass for 500 or more yards in a single game.The Trailblazers’ 631 yards of offense Saturday represents the program’s third highest output in history at the Division II level.This award is also Dixie State’s first RMAC weekly honor of the 2018 season. Tags: Chadron State/Dixie State Football/Michael Sanders/NCAA Division II/RMAC Football October 22, 2018 /Sports News – Local Dixie State’s Michael Sanders Named As RMAC Offensive Player of the Week Written bylast_img read more

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Tales from the lodge: Univ

first_imgRun, jump, praise the Lord. Hallelujah! Over the years, Univ has come to boast the highest pedigree of porters, many of whom have earned themselves as much acclaim as the College’s impressive alumni. There’s Fred, whose retrospective account of his time as head porter, Fred of Oxford, is nestled among the dusty tomes of Univ library. Then there’s the legendary Douglas, who enjoyed such a close rapport with the students that he would offer them personal advice and could predict their future careers. With this in mind, I have high hopes of the current porter being a font of knowledge regarding all manner of student deeds and misdeeds. Yet, sadly for me, the lowly gossip-gleaner, his professionalism and loyalty prevent him from revealing any of the student scandals to which he’s been privy. One story he does tell me suggests that the porters have quite a lot of fun at our expense. A few years ago, there was a porter-led campaign to “crack down on running in the quads”. All those students guilty of anything beyond a brisk walk were fined two pounds. The head porter at the time calculated how many minutes it took to walk from the lodge to different buildings in the College. When a student, locked out of his room, came to the lodge to retrieve his spare key, the porter would insist that it be returned in what he knew to be half the time required. He would then amuse himself in watching that hapless student sprint back to the lodge at full speed, only to be greeted by a two-pound fine. Lest we doubt the altruistic motives of this porter, he assures me that the money was put straight in the charity box. The Univ porters’ sense of humour is confirmed by another story, this one involving a former head porter who was close friends with the chaplain. This duo would often try to outwit each other with pranks, the most memorable incident occuring during Freshers’ Week a couple of years ago. As is usual, the head porter gave his introductory speech to the Freshers, which was due to be followed by the chaplain’s own address. In his speech, the head porter told his audience to stand up, raise their hands in the air and shout, “Hallelujah”, when the chaplain was introduced. Sure enough the chaplain was greeted by the entire body of Freshers with a rousing cry of “Hallelujah!” Despite my wheedling, the porter staunchly refuses to let slip any student exploits, saying that it would be a breach of trust. Yet the glint in his eye assures me that there are one or two anecdotes worth telling. We’ll have to wait for the memoirs.last_img read more

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A green power leader under county executive Tom DeGise

first_imgDear Editor:There are many issues in today’s world facing our environment and I wish to take time to recognize the efforts of our County Executive Tom DeGise in the area of green power and sustainable matters. When Tom took over the reins of county government a number of years ago he was faced with a myriad of issues that required his attention.One of the many areas was the full recognition and subsequent involvement to this day concerning green power. In a symbolic way, he stared his concerns by using a hybrid vehicle to bring recognition to the matters. He demanded in the contracts for the energy to power the county buildings that these providers must deliver at least twenty five percent renewable energy to be considered.The most striking effort is the Hudson County Solar Initiative, the County Executive’s developed program that focused on the issue of green power and climate change and has installed solar arrays on twenty eight public buildings in our County. The facilities are a variety of public sites, schools, municipal buildings, community buildings and are located in Jersey City, Bayonne, West New York, Weehawken, North Bergen, Kearny, Harrison and Secaucus. Tom joined hands with the Hudson County Board of Freeholders in 2017 and the combined Environmental Impact Savings for twenty eight locations prevented almost three and half million pounds of greenhouse gasses from entering our atmosphere.It is the innovative areas that Tom has moved forward with shared services agreements with municipalities on costs from rock salt to traffic engineering work. He is the champion in planting trees in County Parks, county grounds and on the streets of towns in the county at the request of the residents. We in Hudson County are fortunate to have a progressive, professional, honest and caring County Executive who on a daily basis is a true representative by, for and of the people of Hudson County. Respectfully submitted,Robert B. Knapplast_img read more

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ISA gets on the Metro

first_imgISA (UK) has launched a new display cabinet range, Metro, with chilled, ambient and heated modules.The different modules have been designed to combine with other products in ISA’s portfolio, including the Millennium range, which features pastry display units. ISA is aiming the new units at bakeries, sandwich shops and patisseries.The units in the range have four display areas each – three tempered glass shelves plus a base platform. The side panels are made from glass and there is illumination under each shelf. Chilled modules are also available, either as serve-over units or as self-serve, while heated modules are offered as serve-over units.Where fitted, the curved glass front tilts forward for ease of cleaning and the finish is available in a range of standard colours and designs, including the popular ’Millefiori’ – a thousand flowers. In line with its Ecology Project, all ISA’s products use 100% HCFC-free polyurethane insulation, with CO2 as an optional refrigerant.www.isaspa.uk.comlast_img read more

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Press release: Brighton woman imprisoned for laundering £1.4m as part of family fake sex drug operation

first_img Selling medicines outside of the regulated supply chain is a serious criminal offence. If you buy medicines online, you are potentially trusting a criminal to look after your health”. Always seek professional help and visit your GP if you are ill. These criminals are motivated by greed and have no concern about your welfare. MHRA is currently running the #FakeMeds campaign to warn people against buying potentially dangerous or useless unlicensed medicines sold by illegal online suppliers.Visit www.gov.uk/fakemeds for tips on buying medicines safely online and how to avoid unscrupulous sites.center_img A woman has been sentenced today following a long running investigation into the sale of counterfeit and unlicensed drugs which convicted 12 individuals in 2015. The defendant received a prison sentence of 2 years and 3 months.The medicines, which were sold predominantly over the internet, have an estimated value of £11 million with a suggested annual turnover in excess of £3 million.She facilitated payments for the purchase of unlicensed erectile dysfunction medicines and claims that she received 10% of the ‘earnings’ laundered through her account but was unaware that the money was for the unlicensed medicine, Kamagra.Samples of the products were found to contain potent, active medicinal ingredients with potential serious side effects and are classified as prescription only. Supply without medical supervision is dangerous as the contents of unlicensed medicines are unknown and untested.Alastair Jeffrey, MHRA Head of Enforcement said:last_img read more

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Listen To UM’s Joel Cummins Play An Atrium Set On Jam Cruise, Two Years Ago Today

first_imgWith yet another Jam Cruise looming right around the corner, it’s hard to not go back and listen to some of the best moments of past cruises. One particular set that always seems to hit just right is the low-key, intimate Atrium sets. For those that have not been on the best party at sea you can ever attend, the Atrium sets are roughly 45 minutes long, hosted by one artist on the grand piano, and typically feature a number of special guests, and plenty of interesting stories. It’s the perfect lounge set, and one that you don’t get to witness in most setting.Jam Cruise Announces Jam Room Hosts, Piano Sets & Theme NightsUmphrey’s McGee‘s keyboardist Joel Cummins, a regular on the ship, played a particularly memorable set on 1/6/15, which featured guest spots from Paul Hoffman and Anders Beck of Greensky Bluegrass, who helped perform their own “Burn Them” and Umphrey’s fan-favorite “In The Kitchen.” Jason Hann of The String Cheese Incident also sat-in on “Kitchen” along with a set-closer of Joe Cocker‘s “Feelin’ Alright.”The rest of the set consisted of takes on classical numbers by Dmitry Kabalevsky, Claude Debussy, the jazz standard “Linus and Lucy” by Vince Guaraldi, and the Umphrey’s McGee song “Orfeo” which featured the deft skills that Cummins possesses. If there is one tip that we can give you about a Jam Cruise excursion, it’s to definitely NOT miss an Atrium set.Take a listen to Joel Cummins’ 2015 set below, courtesy of taper Eric McRoberts.Setlist: Joel Cummins | The Atrium of Jam Cruise | 1/6/15Sonatina No. 1 Op 32 [Dmitry Kabalevsky]Pour Le Piano Suite: Piano Prelude [Claude Debussy]In Memory Of My Father [Bill Evans]Doctor Gradus Ad Parnassum [Claude Debussy]Linus And Lucy [Vince Guaraldi]Improv > Orfeo [Umphrey’s McGee]Burn Them * [Greensky Bluegrass]In The Kitchen *@ [Umphrey’s McGee]Feelin’ Alright *@ [Joe Cocker]* w/ Paul Hoffman – Mandolin & Anders Beck – [email protected] w/ Jason Hann – Percussionlast_img read more

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The threat to Burma’s minorities

first_imgBurma’s Rohingya people are being slowly squeezed from their homeland by decades-long government policies that critics say deny them citizenship, health care, work, and schooling, with such tactics punctuated by killings, destroyed homes, and tens of thousands sent to camps.That was the picture painted by Harvard scholars and Burmese activists who gathered in Cambridge to discuss what they described as the slow genocide of Burma’s Rohingya, a Muslim minority in the Buddhist-majority country that has endured a wide array of abuse at the hands of the former military government.Though the international community has welcomed steps toward Burmese democracy in recent years, the situation for the Rohingya has improved little, speakers said Tuesday. The Rohingya, who have a long history in Burma, which is also known as Myanmar, remain a stateless people, denied citizenship and subject not just to official oppression, but also to violence from the local Rakhine people, as evidenced by the 2012 riots that displaced 90,000 inhabitants.In a related development, researchers at the International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School released a report this week detailing alleged war crimes and crimes against humanity by the Burmese military against another ethnic group, the Karen, who live near the country’s border with Thailand.The report named three high-ranking officers in charge of a 2005-2008 campaign against the Karen and said that villagers were “indiscriminately attacked,” civilians were “captured and executed,” and tens of thousands were displaced during the campaign.Malik Mujahid, chair of the Parliament of the World’s Religions and president of Justice for All, showed aerial photos of neighborhoods burned to ash. He said the residents of these neighborhoods were marched off to internment camps, where 140,000 live today, often without enough to eat. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer“To break the prevailing cycles of violence in Myanmar, there is a need for concerted effort to reform military policies and practices that have fueled indiscriminate attacks against innocent civilians,” the report said. “Scrutiny into other military operations, particularly those that are ongoing, is also warranted.”The Rohingyas’ troubles can be traced to a 1982 citizenship law that failed to list them among the nation’s indigenous people. Instead, they were classified as Muslim immigrants from neighboring Bangladesh, and denied citizenship. Subsequent campaigns have turned not just official policy against them, but also public opinion, something that would have to change for the situation to be remedied, according to Thomas W. Lamont University Professor Amartya Sen.“In order to win this battle, I think the support of the people is absolutely essential — who have been fed lies,” Sen said.Sen said it is important that the international community pressure the government to change its policy and restore citizenship to the group, and implement educational campaigns to change the minds of the broader population.The Loeb House discussion, titled “The Slow-Burning Genocide of Rohingyas,” was intended to review the situation and develop a research agenda for work to provide a foundation for advocacy and identify possible interventions. The session featured several members of the Rohingya refugee community and representatives of groups interested in humanitarian issues, such as the Parliament of the World’s Religions, Physicians for Human Rights, the nonprofit China Medical Board, and the British think tank Overseas Development Institute.Harvard faculty and researchers involved included Sen; Felicia Knaul, associate professor of global health and social medicine and associate professor of medicine; and Maung Zarni, a lecturer on global health and social medicine. The event was convened by the Harvard Global Equity Initiative, which Knaul directs, together with partner organizations.In introductory remarks, Knaul said that research into the situation is important and that resulting evidence can inform advocacy. She also said that the problem is personal to her, since her father survived the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz and much of the rest of her family was killed in the Holocaust.Wakar Uddin is pictured in Loeb House at Harvard University. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerSen said it is important that the word “genocide” not be tossed around lightly, and he acknowledged that this situation looks different from the murderous examples of Nazi Germany and 1994 Rwanda. Still, he said, the term applies in this case, with lives lost not just to the outbursts of violence, but also to the denial of healthcare and the right to work.Malik Mujahid, chair of the Parliament of the World’s Religions and president of Justice for All, showed aerial photos of neighborhoods burned to ash. He said the residents of these neighborhoods were marched off to internment camps, where 140,000 live today, often without enough to eat.Those Rohingya who live outside the camps are barred from attending school, holding jobs, or traveling freely. They must obtain government permission to marry and are limited to having just two children. Hundreds of them leave the country daily, he said, risking dangerous travel on overcrowded boats to become refugees in Bangladesh, Thailand, and other nearby nations.Tun Khin, a Rohingyan refugee, was born in Burma and grew up there. He and his parents fled the country in the 1970s for Bangladesh. They were repatriated to Burma, and eventually fled a second time. Today, he is a refugee living in the United Kingdom, neither a Burmese citizen nor a foreigner. He called for support to relieve the Rohingyas’ “collective nightmare.”Another refugee, Daw Kin Hla, said she was born in Burma in 1952 and had worked as a middle school teacher before leaving the country. Rohingya civil servants, she said, have been forced to retire or quit their jobs. Today, she said, her family is fractured, with her husband living with her in the U.K., a son in Germany, and a son and daughter in the United States.U Ba Sein, another Rohingya refugee living in Britain, traced the oppression to the late 1970s. He said he saw people physically abused by army personnel, tied up and marched off, and heard stories of rapes and killings.Zarni, who co-authored the 2014 report “The Slow-Burning Genocide of Myanmar’s Rohingya” in the Pacific Rim Law and Policy Journal, detailed official and popular narratives in Burma that call the Rohingya illegal immigrants, a threat to national security, “viruses” and “invaders,” a threat to Buddhist culture, and economic blood-suckers.However, he said that contrary to the government’s assertions, the Rohingya have always lived in Burma. There are records of them dating back to the colonial period in 1790, and they were recognized by the post-independence Burmese government.“They did not come from anywhere else. The Rohingya are there on their ancestral land,” Zarni said.last_img read more

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Science Friday to tape at ND

first_imgThe College of Science’s sesquicentennial celebration will continue on Wednesday night with the taping of “Science Friday” in the Leighton Concert Hall of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC) at 7 p.m. to a sold-out crowd. Science Friday, an NPR radio talk show dedicated to science news and entertainment stories, airs every Friday on NPR affiliate stations from 2-4 p.m. EST.Host and producer Ira Flatow will interview three Notre Dame faculty members as part of the show in addition to at least four other non-Notre Dame guests, according to Marissa Gebhard, assistant director of marketing and communications for the College of Science and a 1998 graduate of Saint Mary’s College.The show will be divided into six segments, and the Notre Dame Glee Club will sing “science-themed songs” in between, Gebhard said.Associate professor Philippe Collon, who specializes in experimental nuclear physics, will speak about the applications of his research on the world of art. Through his research, Collon has developed a method of revealing counterfeit artwork without destroying the sample taken as happens with chemical analysis, according to Gebhard.“He uses nuclear physics to pinpoint the age, date, and material of artwork,” Gebhard said. “Collon will be joined by Greg Smith from the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and together they are going to talk about combating counterfeit art.”Collon’s work centers on “radionuclides,” or radioactive isotopes, which are atoms with unstable nuclei. Radiocarbon dating uses relative amounts of certain types of these isotopes to date artwork and determine authenticity.“The field I work in is called Accelerator Mass Spectrometry or AMS for short. It basically is a very sensitive detection technique that combines accelerators and nuclear physics detection techniques to allow the detection of radionuclides at extremely low concentrations (i.e. the ‘needle in the haystack’),” Collon said in an email.“This technique has applications in art and archaeology,” Collon said. “I got particularly interested in this through the development of the ‘Physics Methods in Art and Archaelogy’ course—PHYS 10262—with my colleague Michael Wiescher. We have now been teaching this course for over eight years here at Notre Dame and it is a fantastic way of introducing modern physics through the bias of art and archaeology to numerous students who would not traditionally be taking a modern physics course.”Jeanne Romero-Severson, professor of biology, will kick off the Science Friday taping, Gebhard said.“Jeanne Romero-Severson, who studies plant microbiomes, will be the first segment,” Gebhard said. “She does a lot of work related to the health of oak trees. Her research has implications for outbreaks of foodborne illness linked to contaminated seed sprouts, and she’s working to combat those bacterial infections.”In the program’s third segment, David Lodge, founder and director of the Notre Dame Environmental Change Initiative, will speak about the ecology of the Great Lakes. Lodge is currently on a one-year leave as a Jefferson Science Fellow in the U.S. Department of State.“[Lodge] is a world-renowned expert on invasive species,” Gebhard said. “He is one of the faculty that is in the media the most of all of the Notre Dame faculty. He studies Asian carp and some other invasive species, which is of particular interest to everyone in the Great Lakes area, as we spend millions and millions of dollars trying to clean them up.”Other guests to the show will include representatives from Studebaker to discuss their electric car, forensic science professor Anne Perez from Saint Joseph’s College, who will discuss her work in forensic entomology and interviews with the Kellogg brothers with University of Michigan professor Howard Markel, according to the College of Science press release.Tags: College of Science, DPAC, Physics, plants, Science Fridaylast_img read more

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Colombian Navy, Air Force Work Together to Combat Drug Trafficking

first_imgBy Marian Romero/Diálogo August 09, 2016 Joint operations run by Colombia’s Navy and Air Force (FAC, for its Spanish acronym) have become an effective in shutting down drug trafficking routes. In just two operations in June, authorities seized more than a metric ton of cocaine hydrochloride in different areas of Colombia’s territorial waters in the Caribbean. Colombian Navy intelligence, together with information from U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) allowed Coast Guard stations in the cities of Santa Marta and Cartagena to interdict the vessels in one operation. However, in both instances, the FAC’s 3rd Combat Air Command guided the Navy’s rapid response units from the air. “Partnering with the FAC has been very beneficial because it provides intelligence from the air that would be slower and less precise from the water. The surveillance area that an aircraft can cover is 10 times larger than that of a ship. It also provides the exact coordinates of the suspicious vessel’s location, which makes for more efficient interdictions,” said Admiral Leonardo Santamaría, commander of the Colombian Navy. Adm. Santamaria explained that the armed forces of all affected countries have had to work together in the fight against international drug trafficking in order to comprehensively manage the situation and prevent the so-called balloon effect – in which the air within a latex balloon that is squeezed moves to a different area but never goes away – with crop eradication and drug trafficking suppression in Latin America. So far this year, the joint operations between the Navy and the FAC have resulted in the immobilization of nine vessels. This contributed to the Navy seizing a total of 72 metric tons of alkaloids to date in all of its operations, with and without the support of other institutions. FAC Support Because Colombia’s coasts front both the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean, the immense maritime space under the responsibility of the Navy led to the need for the partnership. The Colombian Navy and the FAC first began working together on naval interdiction operations in 2007. Since then, the collaboration has grown stronger. Although the success of the joint collaboration is not evident in the number of detained vessels each year due to current data not yet showing a specific trend, the communication methodology and logistics make this partnership an important strategy to combat drug trafficking. “The illegal use of airspace to traffic drugs has dropped by 99 percent, so a decision was made to include missions against illegal maritime traffic as one of the points of the FAC’s doctrine,” explained Colonel Iván Darío Bocanegra, director of FAC Air Defense. “This change has optimized our airspace use and allowed us to increase our use of the means and resources available to carry out national defense operations.” The Air Bridge Denial Agreement between the FAC and the U.S. Government concerning illicit air trafficking interdiction took effect in 2003. Known as the ABD Agreement, it allowed authorities to track and analyze aerial targets, disable illegal airstrips used by drug traffickers, among other strategies, which, in turn, led to the almost 100 percent elimination of airborne drug trafficking. With this positive outcome, the agreement was expanded in 2007 to include FAC air resources in support of suppressing illegal maritime trafficking of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances, known as SSIMT. Naval interdiction is the process of boarding, inspecting, and searching a vessel suspected of engaging in illegal activity. If the suspicion is confirmed, the people on board the vessel are arrested and the illegal cargo is seized. The Colombian Navy is responsible for this part of the operation. The intelligence work is carried out by the Navy, although it can also be performed by the police or U.S. Southern Command. Based on that information, the FAC flies over a specific section of the ocean to find the illegal vessel from the air, whether it is a go-fast boat or a semi-submersible. Once the target has been sighted, the pilot relays the exact coordinates and acts as a guide for a Navy vessel to perform the interdiction. “The operations are performed as discreetly as possible. We fly high enough that we generate no noise that could alert the criminals. Usually, when they feel cornered, they throw the merchandise overboard to reduce their sentence,” Col. Bocanegra explained. “The success of the SSIMT operations lies in the communication between all armed forces involved and in the coordination orchestrated by the Colombian Navy.” Patrolling Both Oceans “Historically, drugs have primarily been trafficked by sea. Outlaws have preferred to travel by sea, even though it takes much longer than an aircraft, because it allows them to carry more weight at less cost,” Adm. Santamaría said. “A go-fast boat can be loaded down with 1.5 metric tons and a semi-submersible with 6 metric tons, but an airplane can only carry a few kilograms. That is why most of the problems occur at sea.” The Colombian Air Force is not the only organization patrolling the vast maritime space. It also has the support of all Central American countries and of the United States. Defense accords focused on combating drug trafficking have made it possible to achieve more effective control. The challenge for these operations is to continue to standardize doctrine and provide training as needed to task forces to carry out increasingly precise interdictions as well as to reduce the amount of drugs trafficked by sea. “With the momentum of the accords we have been implementing for several years now, we’ve set up effective fronts for neutralizing the criminals’ vessels. We have created doctrinal unity and a network of resources has been set up to tactically detect enemies,” Adm. Santamaría said. “Each interdiction operation draws on the resources available along the illegal vessel’s route. It could be an aircraft from one country, a boat or ship from another and so on, until the final mission is completed.”last_img read more

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