The non-marine Crustacea of Antarctica and the islands of the Southern Ocean: biodiversity and biogeography

first_imgA total of 101 verified species and eight ordinal taxa represent the non-marine Crustacea on Antarctica and the islands of the Southern Ocean. The largely terrestrial Isopoda and Amphipoda are confined to some sub-Antarctic and cool temperate islands while the predominantly freshwater Anostraca, Anomopoda, Copepoda (=Calanoida, Cyclopoida, Harpacticoida) and Ostracoda (Podocopida) occur throughout the region. Holocene sea-level rises fragmented freshwater and terrestrial species ranges on New Zealand, Auckland, Campbell, and possibly other South Pacific islands, leaving a legacy of vicariant taxa. Tertiary species probably survived Pleistocene glaciation in aquatic refugia on the New Zealand/South Pacific, Falkland, Crozet and Kerguelen archipelagoes, but there are no valid records of Tertiary Antarctic Crustacea. All 40 Continental and Maritime Antarctic freshwater records can be ascribed to the historic introduction of anthropogenic aliens, Holocene immigration of colonists, returning re-colonists and marine species ‘marooned’ in epishelf and other coastal lakes.last_img read more

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Niche partitioning by three Pterodroma petrel species during non-breeding in the equatorial Pacific Ocean

first_imgNiche divergence is expected for species that compete for shared resources, including migrants that occupy similar regions during the non-breeding season. Studies of temperate seabirds indicate that both spatial and behavioural segregation can be important mechanisms for reducing competition, but there have been few investigations of resource partitioning by closely related taxa in low productivity, tropical environments. We investigated niche partitioning in 3 gadfly petrel taxa, Pterodroma leucoptera leucoptera (n = 22), P. leucoptera caledonica (n = 7) and P. pycrofti (n = 12), during their non-breeding season in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean by combining tracking data from geolocator-immersion loggers with remotely sensed environmental data in species distribution models (SDMs), and by comparing feather stable isotope ratios. The 3 taxa showed spatial partitioning: two foraged in the North Equatorial Counter Current and one in the South Equatorial Current. This reflected differences in their realised habitat niches, with significant taxon-specific responses to thermocline depth, sea surface temperature and bathymetry. There were also differences among taxa in activity patterns, and all birds spent a much larger proportion of time in flight at night than during the day, suggesting predominance of nocturnal foraging behaviour. Comparison of stable isotope ratios in feathers suggests that P. l. leucoptera and P. pycrofti mainly consume vertically migrating mesopelagic fishes, whereas the diet of P. l. caledonica also includes some lower trophic levels including crustaceans and squid. Unique insights can be gained from studies of the foraging ecology of tropical pelagic seabirds, in comparison with temperate and polar waters, and are urgently required for understanding and protecting tropical avifauna in key marine habitats.last_img read more

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UK’s RFTG Sets Sail for Cougar ’13

first_img View post tag: Cougar Share this article Training & Education View post tag: sail View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy View post tag: RFTG View post tag: Group Back to overview,Home naval-today UK’s RFTG Sets Sail for Cougar ’13 View post tag: Force View post tag: UK Thousands of Royal Navy, Royal Marines and Royal Fleet Auxiliary personnel will leave the UK today for an annual deployment to the Mediterranean and Gulf region – Cougar ’13.The long-planned deployment will see elements of the UK’s Response Force Task Group (RFTG) – the naval force formed under the 2010 Strategic Defence and Security Review – hone its world class maritime skills thousands of miles from home through exercises with a number of key allies.Four Royal Navy warships, the Lead Commando Group from 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines and elements of Naval Air Squadrons will be supported by five vessels from the Royal Fleet Auxiliary.This is the third time the deployment has taken place, after Cougars ’11 and ’12, with its aim to demonstrate the ability to operate a highly effective maritime force anywhere in the world to protect UK interests.Secretary of State for Defence, Philip Hammond MP, said: “Since its creation under the 2010 Strategic Defence and Security Review, the Response Force Task Group has demonstrated its formidable strength and readiness to respond to emerging threats worldwide through a number of operations and exercises.“This now routine and long-planned deployment will demonstrate once again its ability to operate as a rapid reaction force on behalf of the UK and, importantly, underlines the global reach and flexibility of the modern Royal Navy.”The Task Group is able to conduct simultaneously a range of operations from deterring adversaries and maritime security to international engagement and supporting regional stability.Its units can operate independently on discrete tasks or as a single entity.Most importantly, it is an adaptable force that is able to work jointly with Army and Royal Air Force assets, other government agencies and partner nations when required.After a number of planned port visits in the Mediterranean, the first major exercise for the force will be Albanian Lion, in the Adriatic.Personnel will work with Albania’s armed forces, building on a similar exercise last year, with the goal to put the Lead Commando Group ashore within a high tempo scenario and sustain it as it moves inland.The ships will then sail through the Red Sea, Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf where the focus will transfer to the series of exercises with UK allies in the Gulf region; alongside Army and RAF units.Commodore Paddy McAlpine, Commander UK Task Group, said: “Cougar ’13 is a bespoke opportunity to enhance the Royal Navy’s enduring core skill – the ability to operate and project power as a task group at range. In so doing, it will also remind interested domestic and international parties of the enduring utility, employability and interoperability of the Royal Navy.“During Cougar ’13 we will engage with our partner nations through a series of exercises, reinforcing our commitment and demonstrating our contribution to security in the Mediterranean and Gulf region.”Commodore McAlpine and his staff will command from the nation’s flagship HMS Bulwark. Alongside Brigadier Stuart Birrell (Commander of 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines) he will choreograph the efforts of Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary sailors, Royal Marine Commandos and Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm personnel.Joining Bulwark will be Portsmouth-based helicopter carrier HMS Illustrious and frigates HMS Montrose (Plymouth) and HMS Westminster (Portsmouth) to provide escort duties, as well as undertake ongoing counter-piracy operations outside the exercise programme.HMS Montrose is also due to reprise her role from Cougar ‘12 as the launch pad for small Royal Marines reconnaissance parties, which are sent ashore to scout the lie of the land and ‘enemy’ forces.The Royal Marines will be embarking HMS Bulwark, RFA Mounts Bay and RFA Lyme Bay: the nation’s Lead Commando Group, including 42 Commando, elements of 30 Commando IX Group, and the Commando Logistics Regiment who will meet all the supply and medical needs and 16 Vikings of the Corps’ Armoured Support Group.A number of Army Commandos from 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery and 24 Commando Engineer Regiment will also deploy as part of the Lead Commando Group.Brigadier Stuart Birrell, Commander 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines, said: “Cougar ’13 provides a superb opportunity to demonstrate the capability and capacity of the Response Force Task Group and the Lead Commando Group. Operating in a wide variety of countries across the Mediterranean and Gulf region, the task group will engage in capacity building and defence engagement with a range of partner nations, in some truly outstanding exercises.“A demanding and ambitious deployment, we will look forward to the challenges and opportunities that Cougar ’13 presents.”RFA Fort Austin will provide stores, fuel, water, and ammunition and RFA Diligence is on hand to attend to any of the Cougar ’13 ship’s engineering requirements.The majority of the Task Group is due home to the UK in December, although Diligence, Westminster and Montrose are due to remain east of Suez in support of the Navy’s long-standing mission in the region to keep the sea lanes safe and secure for lawful trade.[mappress]Press Release, August 12, 2013; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: 13 UK’s RFTG Sets Sail for Cougar ’13 View post tag: response View post tag: sets August 12, 2013 View post tag: Defense View post tag: Defence View post tag: Naval View post tag: Tasklast_img read more

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Why do we have Phobias?

first_imgTen percent of adults suffer from a phobia – that is, “an uncontrollable, irrational and persistent fear of a specific object, situation or activity”. This is hardly surprising given the extensive and eclectic number of phobias on offer. These range from the fear of enclosed spaces (claustrophobia) to fear of bald people (peladophobia) to fear of long words (hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia – certainly long enough to give anyone a fright). Indeed, any Oxford student has a good chance of developing ergophobia, the fear of work, or at the very least, bibliophobia, the fear of books.The question of why we have phobias has frustrated psychologists for centuries. Freudians detect a causal link between a child’s relationship with his parents and his behaviour in his later years. For example, adult agoraphobics (those who fear open spaces) may have once feared abandonment by a cold and unaffectionate mother, which has led to a fear of rejection or helplessness in adulthood. Alternatively, agoraphobia may develop in people seeking to avoid situations they have found painful or embarrassing in the past. Others posit the theory that phobias are socially transmittable. Research suggests that half of all people with phobias have never had a painful experience with the object of their fears. It is therefore possible that, having heard of an injury inflicted on another person by a specific thing,  for this reason, someone has developed a vicarious fear of that  thing. But do phobias develop over time or are they within us innately, from time immemorial? It is suggested that humans have acquired fears of certain animals and situations that, in our evolutionary history, threatened our survival, thereby explaining why snakes and spiders are the top two creature phobias. Our ancestors spent much time on the savannas in Africa, the women gathering food on their knees with their infants close by. Whereas lions could be seen from a distance and therefore avoided, spiders and snakes were concealed and so posed a more threatening ‘invisible’ danger. Another factor to consider is whether or not phobias are culture-specific. Agoraphobia for example, is much more common in the US and Europe than in other areas of the world, while a phobia common in Japan, but almost nonexistent in the West, is taijin kyofusho, an incapacitating fear of offending others through one’s own awkward social behaviour. Since modesty and a sensitive regard for others is strongly entrenched in Japanese society, tajin kyofusho can be seen as a product of Japan’s distinctive value system.last_img read more

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Exeter students moved into hotel rooms

first_imgJCR President Harry Williams, who is personally aff ected by the issues regarding accommodation, commented, “Of course I was disappointed to hear that the development would not be completed on time, but I am pleased with the way the college have handled the situation so far.”Scaffolding was removed from the front façade of the Cohen Quad on Wednesday, “revealing the stunning new roof and beautifully cleaned stonework”, however the accommodation is still not ready.Exeter College purchased Ruskin College’s campus on Walton Street in 2010 in order to create a “third quad” in the heart of Oxford. The new site, designed by Alison Brooks Architects, will off er teaching and study space, a lecture theatre, a café, 90 student bedrooms, sets for Fellows and archive space for the College’s special collections. Exeter third year Flora Hudson, who is supposed to be living in Cohen Quad, commented, “I think college have done the best they could with a bad situation—everyone seems pretty happy with the arrangement.”A common room has been created at the hotel, and college staff will have an office on site seven days a week. The hotel also has a fully-equipped gym, squash courts, steam room, indoor splash-pool and beauty rooms. The Jury’s Inn Hotel have been contacted for comment. Exeter students are spending the first month of Michaelmas in a four-star hotel in Wolvercote as planned accommodation in Cohen Quad remains incomplete.86 students have moved into Jury’s Inn Hotel on the roundabout at the top of Woodstock Road, past Summertown until a provisional date of October 31. Cohen Quad was planned to be completed on August 11, however that date was later changed to October 6 and college was informed at the beginning of September that this would also not be possible.Exeter College is covering all accommodation costs until students take up occupancy at Cohen Quad and students have received free breakfasts, as well as bus passes to travel into central Oxford.The hotel has 168 “stylish” rooms, equipped with free Wi-Fi, en-suite bathrooms, fl at screen TVs with Freeview and trouser presses, according to its website. It also has a fully-equipped gym, squash courts, steam room, indoor splash-pools and beauty rooms.A spokesperson from Exeter College told Cherwell, “There is no single reason as to why the building is delayed: the site and building are complex and it has taken longer to complete than anticipated. We are concerned that all of our students, particularly our Finalists, have not been moved into Cohen Quad and are doing everything we can to mitigate the impact that this change in accommodation has on their studies and College experience.“We booked the hotel the day after we received notice from the contractors that they would not achieve the 6th October occupation date. We were careful in our choice of hotel to ensure that all of our students were housed together in suitable accommodation. Although it is further out from the City centre than we would have liked, keeping them together, as a cohort, was felt to be vitally important for social, emotional, and security issues.“The whole College community remains excited and enthusiastic about what Cohen Quad will achieve for this and future generations of Exeter students. Cohen Quad will not only provide fantastic facilities (including a café, learning commons, study spaces, common room, auditorium – and of course student study bedrooms) but is in the heart of Oxford and the city, just a few minutes’ walk from our historic site. We’re proud of what we’re building but deeply frustrated by the delay and the impact that this will have on our students. To that end, we’re working closely with them to help mitigate the impact of this unexpected change in accommodation and put in place measures that will ensure their safety and preserve the Exeter collegiate community, albeit in north Oxford.”last_img read more

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NIV Pageant Committee Donates to American Legion Post 524

first_imgOcean City’s Night In Venice Pageant Committee presents a $7,000 donation check to American Legion Post 524. NIV Committee members from left, Kathy Lavin, Cathy Finnegan, Sharon Capizzi, Pat Gillian, Susan Cox and Mary Anne Jones. American Legion 100th Anniversary Concert Committee members include (back row) John Van Stone, Mike Hyson, Bob Marzulli and Frank McCall. (Photo courtesy Doug Otto) Ocean City’s Night in Venice Pageant Committee paid tribute to the American Legion’s century of helping veterans and their families by presenting a $7,000 donation to local Post 524 during a special luncheon celebration.The NIV Pageant Committee, formed in 1988, annually chooses three or four local charities to receive funds raised by the 12 Miss Night In Venice contestants as part of their pageant campaigns.“The reason we selected Ocean City American Legion Post 524 as one of our major donation recipients this year is because of the amazing work they do with veterans, veteran families and young people,” said Miss NIV Pageant Committee Chair Pat Gillian.Throughout the year, the local American Legion sponsors a wide range of community projects, such as: The Walk for the Wounded, The Run for the Fallen, The Veterans Rest & Relaxation Program, The Coffee Express (sending packages of care to deployed servicemen and women worldwide), The Veterans Home in Vineland, The Veterans Recognition Program at United Methodist Communities at The Shores, New Jersey Boys’ and Girls’ State, and The Children’s Organ Transplant Association (COTA.)“I thank the NIV Pageant Committee for this generous donation, which will help our local American Legion organization continue its work on behalf of veterans throughout the coming year,” said Post 524 Commander Bob Marzulli.last_img read more

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On deafness

first_imgForget your iPods, industrial workplace noise, over-vigorous use of Q-tips… the main cause of deafness is – you guessed it – unhealthy living. Or so believed our resident agony-uncle-from-the-grave, Dr Allinson.On deafness: “In adults, bad habits are the commonest cause of deafness. Such habits are smoking tobacco, drinking stimulants, over-feeding, taking insufficient exercise, breathing impure air, and not keeping the skin-pores open through proper baths. All these habits produce a disordered system, and deafness may result.”last_img

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Porter Beach reopening for Memorial Day weekend

first_img Porter Beach reopening for Memorial Day weekend Twitter Google+ Pinterest Facebook CoronavirusIndianaLocal WhatsApp Google+ WhatsApp Previous articleLatest COVID-19 numbers for IndianaNext articleMore details released about Notre Dame’s plan to reopen campus Network Indiana Twitter By Network Indiana – May 20, 2020 0 454 Facebook Pinterest (“indiana-dunes-state-park-1848559” by Adam Asar, Public Domain) The Indiana Dunes National Park said it will be reopening its section of Porter Beach for Memorial Day weekend.The park will be reopening the beach, parking lots and restrooms.The town of Porter said it’s town council agreed to keep the community’s beach parking lot closed.Bruce Rowe, supervisory park ranger and public information officer told the Northwest Indiana Times that an information phone line is being put in place to guide visitors to available beach parking.National Park Service and town authorities will be monitoring the beach for overcrowding and will close it if they need to protect public health, said Rowe.He recommends visitors use West Beach or the state park.last_img read more

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This Week’s Picks! Phoenix, Rock of Ages and More

first_img Venture Downtown for Fringe NYC Starts August 8, various locations You love theater, right? That’s why you’re here, and not reading “18 Microwave Snacks You Can Cook in a Mug!” And that’s why you’ll love the colossal New York International Fringe Festival (Fringe NYC), which runs through August 24. It features everything from improv to puppetry to performance art. With 5,000 artists and 18 venues, you’re certain to find something really funky and totally wonderful. Your microwave will understand. Click for tickets! See a Homecoming for the Ages August 4 at the Helen Hayes Theatre General Douglas MacArthur and the Philippines. LeBron James and Cleveland. Those reunions mean squat compared Constantine Maroulis’ return to Rock of Ages! The Tony nominee begins a 12-week engagement in the hit ‘80s rock musical, reprising the role of Drew, a shaggy-haired jukebox hero, that he originated five years ago. We’re glad you took your talents back to the Great White Way, Constantine. Welcome home. Click for tickets! View Comments Pay Tribute to Elaine Stritch August 7 at the Metropolitan Room When a Broadway legend departs, solemn obituaries and earnest tributes are not enough. A proper tribute to Elaine Stritch, who died at age 89 on July 17, must include music. The Metropolitan Room has the right idea, inviting Broadway stars (Annaleigh Ashford, Lisa Brescia, and more) to sing Stritch’s signature tunes. Though let’s be honest: Nobody’s gonna sing “Ladies Who Lunch” quite like our favorite salty gal. Click for tickets! Spend the Night in Phoenix August 7 at the Cherry Lane Theatre Bruce (James Wirt) and Sue (Julia Stiles) have a one-night stand. (Cue sitcom audience “ooohh…”) She has a wonderful time, but wants to move on. Bruce sees potential and isn’t ready to let go. Thus begins the parry-and-thrust—pun fully intended—in Scott Organ’s dark comedy that covers 4,000 miles and two very different, very attractive people testing their boundaries. Runs through August 23. Click for tickets! Follow The Wiz Underground August 10 at 54 Below The Wiz! For kids of the ’70s and ’80s, it’s infectious, gold-plated nostalgia. Remember how many times HBO aired the kick-ass movie musical back in the day? We named our cat Nipsey Russell! 54 Below is offering two servings of 54 Sings The Wiz so we can savor those catchy days of yesteryear. Directed by After Midnight alum T. Oliver Reid, this revue features Ken Page, N’Kenge, and Vivian Reed. Click for tickets! It’s hot. It’s so hot, you can barely walk two feet without looking like you went through a car wash. But towel off, guys! There’s tons of cool happenings, including a return of a Rock of Ages favorite, a musical tribute to a Broadway legend and a concert version of a beloved ’70s musical. It’s all part of this week’s picks!last_img read more

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Southern Region Teen Leadership Conference

first_imgHigh school Georgia 4-H members participated in the Southern Region Teen Leadership Conference (SRTLC) in late September with youth from surrounding Southern states. The annual event gives attending youth and adults opportunities to develop leadership skills and practice networking skills with 4-H’ers in other states.     This year’s leadership conference was held virtually to abide with COVID-19 restrictions, with workshops, networking events, virtual campfires and dances, leadership lessons, and informative roundtable discussions held over video conference. Along with the 98 Georgia 4-H’ers who participated, nearly 500 4-H’ers from other Southern states took part.In addition to scheduled workshops and trainings, 4-H’ers donated school supplies to their local county schools as a part of the event-sponsored service project. Information about donated materials was captured through a survey that participants completed with pictures of donated school supplies. Georgia 4-H’ers contributed generously and, with the help of fellow 4-H’ers from across the region, thousands of items were donated to schools in need.“The conference is an outstanding opportunity to help youth develop leadership and citizenship skills and to help them find opportunities to put those skills to use in their communities,” said Jason Estep, 4-H leadership and civic engagement specialist. “Plus, it is one of the best ways to meet 4-H’ers from other states and learn about their programs.”Youth who attend SRTLC are empowered and inspired to make positive changes across the Southern region through leadership development, networking opportunities and collaborative partnerships. Youth and adult participants present educational workshops and roundtables on topics ranging from dancing for exercise to driver safety, from leadership styles to 3-D printing, and more.Next year’s conference is scheduled for September 23-26, 2021, at the Clyde M. York 4-H Center in Crossville, Tennessee.Georgia 4-H empowers youth to become true leaders by developing necessary life skills, positive relationships and community awareness. As the largest youth leadership organization in the state, 4-H reaches more than 242,000 people annually through the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offices and 4-H facilities. For more information, visit georgia4h.org or find your local UGA Extension office by visiting extension.uga.edu/county-offices.html.last_img read more

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