SUU Men’s Basketball’s Cameron Oluyitan Named As Big Sky Player of the Week

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOGDEN, Utah-Tuesday, Southern Utah University men’s basketball guard/forward Cameron Oluyitan was named as the Big Sky Conference’s Player of the Week.In wins over West Coast Baptist and fellow Division I foe San Jose State, Oluyitan, a 6-7 195-pound native of Sugarland, Texas, averaged 17 points, 4 rebounds, 3.5 steals, 3 assists and one block per game.Oluyitan is one of head coach Todd Simon’s transfers from prominent Division I conferences as Oluyitan has come to SUU from Boise State University of the Mountain West Conference.Oluyitan also has the distinction of being the initial men’s basketball conference player of the week for the new season.The Thunderbirds are next in action November 18 at Seattle U. of the Western Athletic Conference for a 2:00 pm MST tip-off. Brad James Tags: Big Sky Conference Player of the Week/Boise State/Cameron Oluyitan/Mountain West/San Jose State/Seattle U./SUU Men’s Basketball/Todd Simon/WAC/West Coast Baptist Written by November 13, 2018 /Sports News – Local SUU Men’s Basketball’s Cameron Oluyitan Named As Big Sky Player of the Weeklast_img read more

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Nearly 90% of estate agency branches have now re-opened, says high street survey

first_imgSome 88% of all estate agency branches are now open, a new survey of the UK high street following the relaxation of lockdown has revealed.The Local Data company surveyed 20,351 units which were eligible to open under government lockdown guidelines and found that on average across all types of high street unit, 52% had opened.The survey found that estate agency branches had the fourth highest opening rate, just behind car dealerships at 95%, fish and chip shops and Indian takeaways (93%) and pizza delivery units (91%).But many other familiar high street outlets have been far slower to reopen including the worst hit, coffee shops and travel agencies.Coffee shopsOnly 40% of these have re-opened, the former because people are nervous to sit in enclosed spaces and the latter because international travel has yet to re-start in earnest.“Based on this initial research, an increase in empty shops across many high streets is likely as businesses struggle to weather the pandemic,” says Lucy Stainton from the Local Data Company.“Despite having the opportunity to trade, many businesses have chosen not to as yet, especially in London where footfall is taking much longer to return and opening stores becomes economically non-viable.“In the short to medium term vacancy rates will increase; taking a more optimistic stance this could also pave the way for a new wave of entrepreneurs who can take advantage of more affordable rental values and a more captive residential population in alternative locations, as the trend towards increased home working continues.”estate agency branches high street Local Data Company July 17, 2020Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 21st July 2020 at 6:04 amFrom this analysis, as of 17th of July, over two thousand agents have not re-opened their offices, this is a huge number, what will be interesting to understand is what number of these are choosing to trade from home?I know of an agency that had nearly 200 people in the business and several offices, the owner now realises that during lockdown he could run the operation with a substantially smaller workforce, and from one hub and many key workers doing so from home.He plans to expand, utilising his team in a different way, realising that offices are a local beacon, but in a way he can grow his company’s footprint by going down a digital route.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Nearly 90% of estate agency branches have now re-opened, says high street survey previous nextAgencies & PeopleNearly 90% of estate agency branches have now re-opened, says high street surveyThe Local Data Company looked at 20,351 high street units of all business types eligible to re-open and found on average that just over 52% had re-opened.Nigel Lewis17th July 20201 Comment1,079 Viewslast_img read more

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Functional flour range rolled out by Ulrick & Short

first_imgIngredients supplier Ulrick & Short has unveiled a new range of functional flours.Called Fazenda, the range comprises a series of flours derived from crops including tapioca, wheat, rye and spelt. They will join the firm’s clean label thickeners and stabilisers portfolio.Benefits include softness, volume and moisture retention in bread, cakes and muffins, as well as adhesion and viscosity in batters and coatings, said the firm. The processing technologies used provide structure and a range of textures in bakery applications.“Fazenda is a great addition to our ingredient portfolio and has really useful functionalities in both conventional and gluten-free bakery applications. The broad range of crop bases also gives manufacturers greater choice when it comes to declaration and transparency,” said Danni Schroeter, R&D manager at Ulrick & Short.Due to Covid-19, consumer demand is high for food ingredients with ‘simple, recognizable and trustworthy’ declarations, it addedThe range is clean label, non-GM and plant-based, with wholemeal and organic options available.“Ingredient declarations and front of pack claims are now intricately linked to consumer buying habits. They must, therefore, give the consumer a good feeling when purchasing the product – whether this is a clean or organic declaration, or with sustainable ingredients and packaging. If consumers perceive that a product is unhealthy, unnatural, or artificial in any way, it’s a big deterrent,” Schroeter added.last_img read more

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State agency approves loan, insurance relating to Saddleback purchase

first_imgAUGUSTA – The board of directors of the Finance Authority of Maine approved a loan as well as loan insurance Monday, part of a larger financing package that is part of a Boston-area investment fund’s plan to purchase and reopen Saddleback Mountain.FAME approved a $1 million direct loan to Arctaris Impact Fund, as well as $2.5 million in leveraged loan insurance for a $12.5 million loan from Arctaris. Both loans are part of $23.5 million in financing associated with Arctaris’ efforts to close on Saddleback, previously the third largest ski mountain in the state and an employer for up to 300 people during peak winter season. That financing package also includes a $1 million loan from Maine Rural Development Authority, approved in December 2019.Saddleback’s ownership announced the resort would be unable to open for ski operations in the 2015-16 season unless it secured $3 million in financing to purchase a new four-person chairlift. The Berry family purchased Saddleback in 2003, investing more than $40 million in improvements and expanding both the workforce and number of visitors, to as many as 110,000 annually, over a 12-year period.The Berry family announced that it was actively trying to sell the mountain in 2015, with Saddleback later indicating that ownership was in “serious negotiations” with a potential buyer. In 2016, a community group announced its intention to raise funds to purchase and operate the mountain. Then, in 2017, agreements were signed with the Majella Group, headquartered in Brisbane, Australia, to take over mountain operations, including hiring and replacing lifts. That sale was never finalized, however, and Majella Group’s CEO became mired in financial and legal issues in 2018.In November 2019, the Berry family announced that it had an agreement for the purchase and sale of Saddleback Inc. and the Saddleback Land and Timber Corp. to Arctaris Impact Fund.According to a statement released by FAME, the $23.5 million funding package includes private equity, New Market Tax Credits, community loans and community grants for the acquisition of Saddleback. Those funds will cover acquisition costs, as well as renovations, facility upgrades and new lifts and snow-making equipment.“We are pleased to help re-start this historic and beloved Maine ski mountain and to help stimulate economic development in Western Maine,” said Bruce Wagner, Chief Executive Officer of FAME, in the release. “We know how important this mountain’s success is to the local population and economy, as well as to many others who love to recreate in all seasons in the Rangeley area.”“Arctaris is grateful for the support of state and local financing partners. We plan to revitalize the mountain resort and provide 200 full-time and seasonal jobs, which will help stimulate the local economy and the state of Maine as a whole,” said Jonathan Tower, Managing Partner of Arctaris Impact Fund, LP.FAME indicated that resuming operations at the resort was expected to create 71 full-time jobs and another 134 seasonal ones.Arctaris has raised approximately $2 million in private donations, FAME indicated in the release, including funds from condominium owners, philanthropists and the community at large.“I am happy to be able to support the great work happening in the Rangeley area, led by community members,” said Heather Johnson, Commissioner of the Department of Economic and Community Development. “Tourism is one of the top economic drivers in our state and we are excited to see that the revitalization of Saddleback will bring more visitors to this beautiful area. In addition, outdoor recreation is a vital part of Maine’s economy, as well as important for the public health of our communities.”last_img read more

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The Marcus King Band Family Reunion Rounds Up Chuck Leavell, Duane Betts, Billy Strings, & More [Photos]

first_imgLoad remaining images This past weekend, The Marcus King Band Family Reunion brought a slew of talented acts to Black Mountain, NC’s Pisgah Brewing Company for two memorable days of music across the brewery’s two stages.In addition to a pair of headlining sets by festival hosts The Marcus King Band, the Family Reunion featured performances by The Revivalists, Chuck Leavell & Friends, Billy Strings, Dumpstaphunk, The Devon Allman Project Ft. Duane Betts, Nikki Lane, Carl Broemel of My Morning Jacket, Naughty Professor, Dynamo, Geoff Achison, DeRobert & The Half-Truths, Shady Recruits, Steelism, Travers Brothership, and April B & The Cool. The festival also featured plenty of collaboration, including an appearance by Marcus King during The Revivalists’ performance and several guests sit-ins during The Marcus King Band’s Saturday night “Family Jam” set.The Marcus King Band’s second-annual festival coincided with the release of their brand-new LP, Carolina Confessions, released on Friday, October 5th. As King explained to Billboad about the album,I wanted this record to focus a little bit more on songwriting and the structure of the tune itself.” King describes the ten-song catalog as “the confessional side of things. Music, for me, is a way to say what’s on my mind and kind of a way to explain that — just like true confession, if you feel guilty and want to get some things off your chest. That’s how writing is and making music is for me.The Marcus King Band – Carolina Confessions – Full AlbumBelow, you can check out a beautiful gallery of photos from the second day of The Marcus King Band Family Reunion 2018 courtesy of photographer Emily Butler.For a full list of The Marcus King Band’s upcoming performances, head to the band’s website here.Marcus King Band Family Reunion | Pigsah Brewing | Black Mountain, NC | 10/6/18 | Photos: Emily Butlerlast_img read more

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Plácido Domingo shares his secrets

first_imgOpera giant Plácido Domingo will sit down Thursday for “Giving Voice,” a conversation moderated by Tamar Herzog, Monroe Gutman Professor of Latin American Affairs and of History, and Anne C. Shreffler, James Edward Ditson Professor of Music.A legendary performer, the Madrid-born Domingo studied at the National Conservatory of Music in Mexico City, singing with his parents’ zarzuela (musical comedy troupe) as a teenager and landing early roles as a baritone. He worked many minor jobs and as an accompanist before he landed his first leading role at the Teatro Maria Tereza Montoya in 1961, when he performed as Alfredo in “La traviata.” He spent an intense three seasons at Tel Aviv’s Hebrew National Opera, then came to the United States to premiere Alberto Ginastera’s “Don Rodrigo” at the New York State Theater at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. An international performer known for his rich tenor voice, Domingo has an affection for stages across the globe as both opera singer and conductor. He is married to soprano Marta Ornelas, and has two sons.He has performed “Tosca,” “La bohème,” and “Carmen” many times, and has also conducted many of these operas. In London in 2003, he sang the matinee performance of Leoncavallo’s “Pagliacci” and conducted the same opera that evening.Domingo is president of Europa Nostra, an organization that champions projects to restore and preserve Europe’s cultural heritage. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and has been a Kennedy Center honoree. In 2009, Sweden presented him with the first Birgit Nilsson Prize ($1 million) for outstanding achievements in opera. He donated the prize to help fund Operalia, the international opera competition for young performers he established in 1993. He spoke with the Gazette via email.GAZETTE: Plácido Domingo by the numbers is extraordinary. More than 3,800 performances — 800 at the Metropolitan Opera. One hundred forty-seven roles. Hundreds of recordings. What has been your secret?DOMINGO: Passion! I love what I do and I am happiest when I am making music and around the theater, my colleagues, a very loving and supportive family, and dear friends. I grew up in this world. My parents gave me two lives — my natural life and the life of my music. I knew nothing else growing up, other than soccer, which was my other passion. I wanted to be around music all the time.GAZETTE: You became a father very young, and it’s a time you described as challenging. You became a working musician, singing background, playing piano as an accompanist. Did it frame the hard worker you became?DOMINGO: Certainly. This circumstance came very early on, and I needed to become an earning professional much sooner than I would have had to otherwise. No doubt it forced me to develop a sense of discipline, a work ethic, and the consummate student I continue to be today.GAZETTE: You established Operalia, an annual opera competition for emerging talent. What is your advice to young students? How do you choose the best opportunities when you sometimes can’t see the immediate benefit?DOMINGO: You need to be passionate and focused. It is all in the road. Not a single step is a waste. I played small parts in musicals, played the piano in bars, accompanied or conducted in my parents’ zarzuela company, and even sang in the first production of “My Fair Lady” in Mexico. Turn every opportunity into a learned lesson.GAZETTE: As an artist, you still perform (most recently “Simon Boccanegra” in New York). How has your voice changed, and, more importantly, what has changed about how you think about being an artist?DOMINGO: I still have a very active career both singing and conducting. I am grateful for the extra mileage that I have been granted and so long as I can perform to my and the audience’s satisfaction and enjoyment, I will continue. The recent runs of “I due Foscari” in La Scala in Milan and “Simon Boccanegra” at the Met — both are Verdi baritone roles and I have ventured into these roles because my voice has darkened with time and has come full circle. I did commence my career as a baritone, and had to look and push for the tenor repertoire. “Simon Boccanegra” has been a real dream baritone role, and it was the first one that I did. Other great regal and paternal roles from Verdi’s masterpieces followed. To have found the chance to explore and learn new roles and create new characters on stage has permitted me to evolve and keep my mind busy and fresh.GAZETTE: Since 2009, you’ve transitioned to baritone roles. Can you talk about the mentality of being able to make that shift?DOMINGO: I suppose I acquired the ability very early on. Not only because I had to start working and earning a living in whichever way possible, but also because of the great diversity of repertoire that my wife, Marta, and I had to prepare and perform during our 2½-year residence in Tel Aviv at the Israel National Opera singing 280 performances in 12 different roles.GAZETTE: You won 14 Grammys, were the first to receive the Birgit Nilsson Prize, and will be an inaugural inductee in the Lincoln Center Hall of Fame. Does anything still elude you? What do you still want to accomplish?DOMINGO: I am happy and honored to be recognized and celebrated for what I do, and to be able to give back to this wonderful art form. I pray for health and time to spend with my family. If God blesses me with the possibility to continue performing, I will continue a little longer. There are a couple of new roles in the works and much to do for young, aspiring singers. There are great talents in the world needing to be discovered and helped to emerge. I hope Operalia and the young artist programs I created in Los Angeles and in Valencia, Spain, will remain pillar parts of my legacy.“Giving Voice: A Conversation with Plácido Domingo” will take place at 4 p.m. Thursday at Sanders Theatre.last_img read more

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The climate change threat to food

first_imgThe effects of climate change may be producing a domino effect worldwide, and one area of increasing concern involves food.Four experts gathered at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health on Tuesday for a panel concerning the impact of climate change on agriculture and the global food system, with an emphasis on the United States and Africa, and a nod toward how the incoming Trump administration might affect the issue.Moderated by Peter Thomson, environment editor at Public Radio International’s “The World,” the panel consisted of Gary Adamkiewicz, assistant professor of environmental health and exposure disparities at the Harvard Chan School; Margaret Walsh, senior ecologist at the Climate Change Program Office, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Calestous Juma, professor of the practice of international development at Harvard Kennedy School; and Caleb Harper, principal investigator and director of the Open Agriculture Initiative at the MIT Media Lab.Interspersed by short videos, the hourlong session focused on the effects climate change has on food security and the environment, noting the roles played by consumer demand and emerging technologies and innovation.With the world’s population expected to pass 9 billion by 2050, the question of how to feed and nourish everyone becomes ever more urgent, the panelists said. Adamkiewicz noted that an estimated 800 million to 900 million people worldwide are undernourished, an issue that both Walsh and Juma also addressed.“This idea of feeding the world is really a 20th-century idea,” Juma said, noting that the tendency historically has been to select for high yields of certain crops, rather than for high nutritional content. “It seems to me today that the focus is on nourishing the world.”Noting that there has been good progress in reducing the number of undernourished people worldwide, from 19 percent to 11 percent, over the past 25 years, Walsh said that food production alone remains insufficient for achieving food security, pointing to roles played by prices, affordability, safety, distribution, and more. How food is processed, packaged, stored, traded, bought, and sold, even how it is wasted, all combine to have significant effects on food security and the environment. Focus on food Twenty-two faculty deliver lightning lectures on research, realities involving what we eat Related Consumer demand is also a factor, Adamkiewicz said, noting that the livestock sector accounts for 14 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. He put global food waste at 30 to 40 percent, and linked such waste with the consumption of energy and other resources. “We are also deforesting,’’ he said.Juma, who heads a project called Agriculture Innovation in Africa, said that in developing countries the impact of climate change on agriculture “is actually understated.” He noted that studies are mainly focused on yields, rarely including decisions made by farmers confronting climate change, who may reduce their crops in arid areas or even abandon agriculture altogether. “The challenges are much more serious than we think,” he said.Noting that just 2 percent of Americans are involved in farming, and have an average age of 58, Harper called for a “public commons” to bring the next generation of scientific tools and technologies into view on the biochemical expression in food. “We’re going to expand the definition of what farming means, and it’s going to go across all disciplines,” he said.Referring to the work of the MIT Open Agriculture Initiative, Harper described personal food computers, boxes that create a climate inside. He described a future of meat cultivation, grown through cell cultures rather than by raising animals, and predicted a return to ancient techniques such as fermenting and brewing.Asked to comment on the prospect of an incoming administration evidently hostile to the issue of climate change, the panelists were equable. Harper said that support for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education is noncontroversial, and “squarely on the agenda of every political party.”Juma said that some effects of climate change echo those of drought, which Africa has long dealt with. African leaders, he said, are approaching climate change as an item of housekeeping, and will explore the issue “independent of what happens at the White House.”last_img read more

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ERP Is No Longer Considered a Four-Letter Word

first_imgFor most IT executives, the term ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) is often a four-letter word, but it doesn’t have to be.I’ve had the good fortune of leading several major system transformations in my 20+ years in the industry, most recently at EMC. And while replacing EMC’s legacy systems with a standardized SAP-based one was challenging, there are strategies I’d like to share that can help the process go smoothly.At EMC, we were faced with an aging ERP infrastructure that was limiting our ability to scale and support a dynamic business model. More than 10 years old and customized so extensively, it could no longer be upgraded. This resulted in a significant increase in total cost of ownership and a high level of risk to our growing business.We were determined to take a radically different approach with our new ERP program, code named PROPEL. As such, we worked with EMC senior management and a number of key business leaders to define critical guiding principles at the outset. They included:No customizationsUse an agile and “go fast” approachAdopt industry standard practices and adapt business processesBuild a foundation for future growth and scalabilityMake it a business-led program with strong governanceAs a business-led project, PROPEL had to be staffed by talented, senior business people from the major process function areas—Manufacturing, Finance, Engineering, Procurement and Supply Chain. These people, combined with the IT team, formed the core PROPEL team.From a technology perspective, we chose the industry-leading SAP ERP package, and leveraged EMC technology to ensure a high-performing, scalable and efficient system. As a result, we are now the largest SAP instance that is 100 percent virtualized on VCE Vblock technology.A critical success factor for ensuring we adhered to our guiding principles was establishing a strong program governance model. This model served as a review board for all enhancement or customization requests and also was key to our change management and communications efforts.In addition, we had more than 500 “super users” from the PROPEL team’s respective business units who acted as extended project team members and helped drive implementation of the system and new business processes.We had all the pieces in place—the right people, the right governance, the right processes, the right approach and the right technology. The communication, governance and the level of rigor were critical.This winning combination allowed us to meet our go-live target and budget. We have successfully closed multiple quarters, handling record volumes on the new system with minimal issues.In addition, by leveraging EMC and VCE technology, we have a high performing, scalable and highly available infrastructure, all while saving more than $10 million.Some of the lessons we learned along the way that are important for those who wish to embark on their own ERP implementation include:Executive support is critical to success.Identify and assign the right resources from the business. These projects need to be business–led to be effective.Spend time cleaning up your critical data such as customer, product and material records. Clean it as early as possible—before and during the project. And then put a master data management governance process in place to make sure it stays clean.Don’t underestimate the level of business change required to implement a new ERP system, especially if you want to minimize enhancements and customizations.As you make changes and transform processes, know when what you’ve achieved is good enough. In some cases, perfect is the enemy of good, which is sometimes a tough realization for people.Establish key metrics up front and ensure they are tracked post implementation.Although ERP projects, like any large transformational program, are often incredibly challenging, we’ve proven that with the right principles, technology and approach you can truly be successful. And ERP no longer has to be a four-letter word.last_img read more

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Dance Marathon holds hype room as part of annual Riley Week

first_imgSara Schlecht | The Observer As part of Riley Week, Saint Mary’s students gather in the Stapleton Lounge in Le Mans Hall Monday night to brainstorm fundraising ideas for the Dance Marathon.The week also serves as a time for the organization to push fundraising for the hospital.“We want to emphasize our cause’s connection on campus,” said Landis Collins, junior and Dance Marathon vice president.Monday evening’s event, a hype room, consisted of several fundraising challenges for those in attendance. While upbeat music played, participants enjoyed refreshments as they were tasked with requesting donations in various ways, such as asking someone with a February birthday to donate.“It’s a one-hour hype room to get all the committees together and push ourselves to see what we can do,” Carragher said.At the end of the event, senior and Dance Marathon vice president Anna Zappa announced Monday’s fundraising efforts had generated more than $2,300.Sunday’s programming consisted of a dinner for Riley families and a Mass during which the collection was donated to the hospital.One Riley Week event will make particular use of Dance Marathon’s access to the tri-campus community, Collins said.“Thursday night, we have Search for a Star, which will be at Notre Dame,” Collins said. “It’s like a talent show.”The talent show will be open to students performing a variety of acts, including music, comedy and dance, Carragher said.“The winner of the Search for a Star competition on Thursday gets to come perform at the marathon,” Zappa said.Dance Marathon will also have a table set up at Friday’s Student Health Fair in the Angela Athletic Facility, at which there will be a blood drive.“We’re doing blood drive sign ups, and for every single person that donates blood, $1 will be donated to Dance Marathon,” Carragher said.Another order of the popular EMX sweatshirts will also be placed in honor of Riley Week.“Every day this week, we have tabling for EMX sweatshirts and Dance Marathon registration as well as a silent auction in the student center,” Collins said. “You can write down a bid for our different themed baskets.”While this variety of events will continue to occur throughout the week, the mission of the week remains constant — preparation for the actual event, which will take place April 4.“We want to do everything we can to create awareness and educate our community not only on what Dance Marathon is, but what Riley Hospital [for Children] is,” Carragher said. “That’s what Riley Week is.”Tags: Dance Marathon, riley hospital for children, Riley Week, Saint Mary’s College Dance Marathon This week, Saint Mary’s College Dance Marathon (SMCDM) is working to publicize its support of Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis. Riley Week, which began Sunday, features a series of events that engage the College community in supporting the hospital. Monday evening, members of the Saint Mary’s community gathered in Stapleton Lounge in Le Mans Hall for an hour of fundraising together.“Riley Week is a week dedicated to raising money and having all these events to raise that awareness for the children down at Riley,” senior Clare Carragher, president of Dance Marathon, said. “It’s also a way for Dance Marathon to really spark and create this energy that is needed in our last workload before the marathon actually hits.”last_img read more

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Vermont to lead effort to write new science standards

first_imgThe state of Vermont will be among a group of states selected to lead an important effort to improve science education for all students. Vermont is one of 20 states that will lead the development of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), which will clearly define the content and practices students will need to learn from kindergarten through high school graduation. The NGSS process is being managed by Achieve an education reform non-profit organization. ‘Vermont has always had rigorous science standards, but it was time for them to be reviewed, said Armando Vilaseca, Vermont Commissioner of Education. Being a lead state will give Vermont access to current edge research and thinking around scientific principles. This partnership will provide content insights to inform the incorporation of engineering in science instruction and provide new, engaging learning opportunities for all students.’ The 20 Lead State Partners are Arizona, California, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Washington and West Virginia.‘The Lead State Partners will provide important leadership and guidance throughout the development of the Next Generation Science Standards and are to be congratulated for making a strong commitment to improving science education,’ said Michael Cohen, president of Achieve. ‘This will be a collaborative process that will lead to a set of standards that provides America’s students a strong foundation in science and supports college and career readiness for all.’ The development of the Next Generation Science Standards is a two-step process. The first step was the building of a framework that identified the core ideas and practices in natural sciences and engineering that all students should be familiar with by the time they graduate. In July, the National Research Council released A Framework for K-12 Science Education, developed by a committee representing expertise in science, teaching and learning, curriculum, assessment and education policy. The second step is the development of science standards based on the Framework. As a Lead State Partner, (STATE) will guide the standard writing process, gather and deliver feedback from state-level committees and come together to address common issues and challenges. The Lead State Partners also agree to commit staff time to the initiative and, upon completion, give serious consideration to adopting the Next Generation Science Standards. In order to be considered, states had to submit a letter with the signature of the Chief State School Officer and the chair of the State Board of Education. American students continue to lag internationally in science education, making them less competitive for the jobs of the present and the future. A recent U.S. Department of Commerce study shows that over the past 10 years, growth in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) jobs was three times greater than that of non-STEM jobs. The report also shows that STEM jobs are expected to continue to grow at a faster rate than other jobs in the coming decade. ‘There is a clear benefit to providing our students with the strong science education they need to compete in college and the work place,’ said Stephen Pruitt, Vice President of Content, Research and Development at Achieve, who is coordinating the NGSS effort. ‘A strong science education provides all students with opportunities to be successful in the 21st century.’ For more information, visit the Next Generation Science Standards website at www.nextgenscience.org(link is external)last_img read more

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