Agents driving up road safety standards

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Agents driving up road safety standards Agents driving up road safety standards10th February 20160562 Views A survey of over 2,000 people by finance specialist, Zuto, has revealed that agents are widely considered to be the UK’s best drivers by profession. Police officers and farmers come in at second and third, followed by chefs and artists.The study also showed that 80 per cent of estate agents have never received a speeding fine, while a further 92 per cent have never even run a red light.In contrast, more than half of accountants confessed to receiving a speeding fine, more so than any other occupation listed. And 10 per cent of those guilty of speeding were repeat offenders, with an average of five fines compared to the national average of one.The survey also found that high-stress careers, such as those in the healthcare profession, struggle most with obeying road rules. Trickier manoeuvres, like the parallel park, test the patience of those in marketing and recruitment.James Wilkinson, CEO of Zuto, said, “It’s interesting to see that our driving habits could be influenced by our jobs and it’s reassuring that occupations where people tend to drive others around such as estate agents and police officers, see driving habits and overall safety improve as a result.”The findings of the study will please those agencies that provide their members of staff with a company car, and more so if they use company vehicles to enhance their firm’s brand presence within the areas in which they operate.A car presence is often an indication of an estate agent’s strength and reputation as an established agent in a local area, demonstrating market share, which in turn should help to generate more business by acting as a visible sales tool.In fact it could be argued that branded company cars which are “in your face”, as Gary Rose, Director at Planet Leasing describes it, are just as important as estate agency boards when it comes to marketing, if not more so, as they will dominate the local streets, providing the agency with maximum exposure.“Leasing a vehicle offers an extended opportunity to promote a brand,” said Rose. “By not having a branded car you are effectively reducing your chances of attracting fresh business.”James Wilkinson UK’s best drivers road safety standards brand presence branded company cars Signature Estates company car Waterfords 2016-02-10The Negotiator Related articles Laptops donated by Hunters in memory of murdered York estate agent28th April 2021 Your Move parent group posts extraordinary profits surge28th April 2021 TPFG boss: Why we’ve joined rival LSL’s mortgage network27th April 2021What’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.last_img read more

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INDIANA BLACK LEGISLATIVE CAUCUS TO CONDUCT TOWN HALL MEETING IN EVANSVILLE ON SATURDAY

first_imgThe Indiana Black Legislative Caucus (IBLC) will conduct a town hall meeting in Evansville on Saturday (April 9) to discuss the results of the 2016 legislative session.The meeting will take place from noon to 2 p.m. local time in the Forum Wing of the Wright Administration Building on the USI campus in Evansville.The town hall is open for anyone who is interested in learning about what happened during the past session, has questions for legislative members or would like to offer suggestions on issues they would like the IBLC to address in future years.“The sessions give us the opportunity to learn what Hoosiers think needs to be improved in Indiana,” said IBLC Chairman, State Senator Lonnie M. Randolph (D-East Chicago). “Our constituents’ input is invaluable as we work to shape the course of the next legislative session.”FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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University of Southern Indiana Men’s Basketball Opened 2015-16 Great Lakes Valley Conference With…

first_imgEVANSVILLE, Ind. – University of Southern Indiana Men’s Basketball opened the 2015-16 Great Lakes Valley Conference campaign with an 89-61 victory over McKendree University Thursday night at the Physical Activities Center. USI goes to 5-2 overall and 1-0 to open GLVC play, while McKendree sees its record go to 4-1 in 2015-16, 0-1 GLVC.The Screaming Eagles, who are 4-1 during the six-game homestand, have won 24-straight GLVC openers since 1992.In the first half, USI scored seven of the first nine points and controlled the first 20 minutes of the contest. The Eagles posted their first double-digit lead, 21-11, with 8:50 left in the half and extended the lead to as many as 17 points, 38-21, at the 2:19 mark. The Bearcats would scratch their way back to a 10-point deficit before the Eagles took a 40-28 lead into the intermission.A key to USI’s first half run was its defense that held McKendree to 36 percent from the field (9-25) and outrebounded the Bearcats, 22-16.The Eagles put on the jets in the second half and quickly put the contest out of reach. Led by junior guard Travis Britt’s (Rantoul, Illinois) 12-point second half performance, USI methodically extended the halftime advantage to a game-high 29 points, 89-60, in the final minute before the final buzzer rang on the 89-61 victory.Individually, Britt would lead five USI players in double-figures with a career-high 15 points. He was five-of-eight from the field, four-of-six from beyond the arc, and a perfect one-of-one from the charity stripe.Senior forward George Edwards (Chicago, Illinois) and junior guard Bobo Drummond (Peoria, Illinois) followed Britt in the scoring column with 13 points each, while senior forward Shane Seniour (Newburgh, Indiana) and junior forward T.J. Tisdell (Cape Girardeau, Missouri) rounded out the double-digit scorers with 12 points and 10 points, respectively. Drummond also had a game-high and career-high seven assists.As a team, USI shot 50 percent from the field for the first time in three games, hitting 34-of-68, and won the battle on the glass, 43-26.USI concludes the homestand and the first weekend of GLVC play against the University of Illinois Springfield Saturday at 3:15 p.m. The Prairie Stars lost their GLVC opener, 72-62, to 24th-ranked Bellarmine this evening in Louisville, Kentucky, and saw their record go to 3-4 overall and 0-1 in the league.The Eagles lead the all-time series with Illinois Springfield, 7-2, after defeating the Prairie Stars, 67-54, on the road in 2014-15. The Eagles are 5-1 versus the Stars at the PAC since 2000 and have won last two meetings at home.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Ocean City Primary School Students Learn a Valuable Lesson About Highway Safety

first_imgChildren listened while Shelton spoke of tips for being safer on the road.Wayne Shelton looked out on the sea of attentive, young faces Wednesday morning and posed a blunt question that children of this age would normally not have to contemplate. While stressing the dangers of highway travel, Shelton asked them what happens sometimes when cars are on the road. “Crash,” came the thunderous, collective response from the 380 kindergarten, first, second, and third grade students who filled the multi-purpose room at the Ocean City Primary School. Shelton shook his head yes, realizing that the children were learning a valuable, potentially lifesaving lesson that should stick with them for many, many years. Shelton, a traffic safety specialist for the South Jersey Transportation Planning Organization, was at the school for a  “Belts on Bones” program that teaches children just how critical it is for them to buckle up. The “Belts on Bones” moniker refers to the importance of placing seat belts and safety harnesses over the strongest parts of the body for maximum protection. “People don’t usually realize that if safety restraints aren’t properly fitted, they can hurt you,” Shelton said.Nearly 400 children in kindergarten, first, second and third grades at the Ocean City Primary School learned about highway safety Wednesday The hope is that the children will take the information home and share it with their parents so that the entire family will be safer on the road. In effect, the kids will be teaching the adults. “We hope this is ingrained in them and will carry forward with good safety practices,” said Joel Dougan, the school’s guidance counselor who organizes the program every year. Sgt. Brian Hopely, of the Ocean City Police Department’s Traffic Safety Unit, stressed that children are never too young to learn about safety. “Anything we can do to reinforce safety, especially when they’re at this age, will lead to lifelong safety habits,” Hopely said. Studies show that people who receive safety instruction at a young age tend to be more safety conscious when they become drivers and even while riding their bikes, Hopely explained. In April, Hopely and other safety officials will be at Ocean City High School for a “Share the Keys” program that teaches teenagers highway safety tips as they prepare to become first-time drivers. Students at the Ocean City Primary School have years to go before they get behind the wheel, but there are ways they can immediately protect themselves as passengers. Seat belts and safety harnesses are among the simplest and most effective method to protect children in a crash, Shelton said. Safety experts also recommend that all children under the age of 13 should ride in the back seat. A safety or booster seat is another way to provide extra protection for very young children. Shelton said a booster seat costs only about $15. Shelton told the students that they must also wear seat belts when they are riding on the school bus. Shelton called kindergarten student Karissa Kelly up on the stage and had her sit in a bus-like seat to demonstrate the proper way to buckle up.Wayne Shelton, of the South Jersey Transportation Planning Organization, demonstrated the proper way to wear safety harnesses on kindergarten student Karissa Kelly. Karissa, 5, said she learned a lot from the program and would feel “really safe” the next time she rides in a car because she now knows how to protect herself better. Griffin Gray, 6, a first grader, said he will be sure to tell his family about the safety tips that were discussed during the program. “I learned about being much safer when I’m in the car, Griffin said. Some sobering statistics contained in a New Jersey Division of Highway Traffic Safety pamphlet that Shelton handed out illustrate just how dangerous road travel can be for children. In the United States, motor vehicle crashes are the main cause of death for children over the age of six months, according to the pamphlet.By Donald Wittkowskilast_img read more

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Warren Haynes Plays Grateful Dead, Allman Brothers Tunes With Ashes & Dust: Gallery/Review

first_imgLoad remaining images It is amazing how music is so embedded in Warren Haynes’ essence. 2016 is another big year for him. He has an early summer European tour with Gov’t Mule, and he has a bunch of dates as the leader of the Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration. Even so, he finds time for other side projects, including the Ashes and Dust Band. They stopped by Milwaukee’s Pabst Theater last night, February 24th, for a splendid night of great entertainment.In stark contrast to his other musical endeavors, Warren Haynes & the Ashes and Dust Band is much more folksy and acoustic-based. On the album simply titled Ashes and Dust, Haynes asked Railroad Earth to do the backing music. They couldn’t come along because they are busy with their own tour, so Haynes brought drummer Jeff Sipe as well as musicians from ChessBoxer.They opened the night with “Is It Me or You,” the same opening track of Ashes and Dust. A soulful Patchwork Quilt followed. Things got rocking when they played “One More Cup of Coffee,” where Haynes’ wailing guitar solos blared from the amplifiers. Then the bass player rid himself of the upright bass in favor of an electric bass guitar for a very long and very funky version of Little Feat’s “Skin It Back.” With all the instruments plugged in and powered up, this was the most rocking point of the show.With plenty of material from the Ashes & Dust album, Haynes made sure to give a nod to some classics. Perhaps the loudest ovation from the crowd came when they started playing “Loser” by the Grateful Dead. Haynes’ vocals were spot on, and the song contained an excellent violin solo, which was only topped by the banjo solo, which of course was topped by the guitar solo. The Allman Brothers’ “Blue Sky” and “Jessica” were also played flawlessly. The latter closed out the set.The encore featured an a cappella cover of the Stanley Brothers’ “Angel Band,” that went straight into Gov’t Mule’s “Soulshine.” Hearing a different version of the song that is normally played fairly standard every time by Mule was a real treat. They closed the show out with a rocking “Two of a Kind.”Before Haynes goes back to Gov’t Mule and the Jerry Garcia symphonic celebrations, take the chance to see him on his current tour with the Ashes and Dust band. It certainly brings out a different facet of Haynes’ musicianship that you will easily enjoy. The one and only Warren Haynes is certain to impress.Setlist: Warren Haynes And The Ashes & Dust Band at the Pabst Theater, Milwaukee, WI – 2/24/16Set: Is It Me or You, Patchwork Quilt, Beat Down the Dust, One More Cup of Coffee, Skin It Back, Instrumental Illness, Madman Across the Water, Loser, Company Man, Blue Sky, Dusk Till Dawn, Drums, Spots of Time, JessicaEncore: Angel Band, Soulshine, Two of a KindView the full gallery of photos from Daniel Ojeda below:last_img read more

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Circles Around The Sun Announce Additional 2019 Spring Tour Dates

first_imgOn Monday, Circles Around The Sun announced a number of additions to their spring 2019 tour schedule.The new batch of dates will bring the buzzworthy jam quartet to Fayetteville, AR (4/30); Asheville, NC (5/10); Washington, D.C. (5/30); Lancaster, PA (6/4); and Cleveland, OH (6/7).Recently, Circles Around The Sun released a double album, Let It Wander, via Rhino, marking the first release since the band’s acclaimed 2015 debut record, Interludes For The Dead, which was composed especially for the set break music at the Grateful Dead Fare Thee Well concerts in 2015.Circles Around The Sun – Let It Wander – Full AlbumTickets for the newly announced shows are on sale now. See below for a full list of Circles Around The Sun’s upcoming spring tour dates. For ticketing details and more information, head to Circles Around The Sun’s website.Circles Around The Sun 2019 Tour DatesNewly added dates boldedApril 27 – Austin, TX – Antone’s NightclubApril 28 – Houston, TX – Last Concert CafeApril 30 – Fayetteville, AR – George’s Majestic LoungeMay 1 – Jackson, MS – Duling HallMay 2 – Baton Rouge, LA – Varsity TheatreMay 4 – New Orleans, LA – The Howlin’ WolfMay 7 – Raleigh, NC – Lincoln TheatreMay 8 – Atlanta, GA – Terminal WestMay 9 – Nashville, TN – The Basement EastMay 10 – Asheville, NC – The Grey EagleMay 11- Aiken, SC – Aiken Bluegrass FestivalMay 30 – Washington, D.C. – Gypsysally’sJune 1 – Brooklyn, NY – Brooklyn BowlJune 2 – Fairfield, CT – The Warehouse at FTCJune 4 – Lancaster, PA – Zoetropolis Cinema StillhouseJune 5 – Burlington, VT – Higher GroundJune 6 – Stephentown, NY – Disc Jam Music FestivalJune 7 – Cleveland, OH – The Beachland Ballroom and TavernJune 8 – Wellston, MI – Camp GreenskyAugust 22 – Arrington, VA – LOCKN’ FestivalView Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Harvard Divinity School faculty votes for open access policy

first_imgThe faculty of Harvard Divinity School (HDS) voted, in  a meeting on Nov. 15, to allow Harvard University to make electronic versions of their current scholarly articles available to the public. With the vote for open access, the Divinity School faculty joined five other Harvard schools in a commitment to disseminate faculty research and scholarship as widely as possible.“While open access has grown more quickly in the sciences, the movement is of vital importance in all fields of scholarly inquiry,” said Laura Wood, librarian of Andover-Harvard Theological Library at HDS. “The HDS faculty has taken an important step—both practically and philosophically—toward broader dissemination of their scholarship.”Faculty members will be able to deposit electronic copies of their publications in an open access digital repository, or archive, managed by the  University’s Office for Scholarly Communication. The contents of the repository are freely available to the public, are searchable and accessible to other services such as Google Scholar, and will be maintained, archived, and preserved.Under the open access policy, HDS faculty authors retain copyright of their articles, but grant Harvard an automatic, nonexclusive license to open-access distribution, unless they choose to waive Harvard’s license on a case-by-case basis, at their own discretion.“I am very pleased that my colleagues have voted to commit to Harvard’s open access initiative,” said William A. Graham, dean of Harvard Divinity School, John Lord O’Brian Professor of Divinity at HDS, and Murray A. Albertson Professor of Middle Eastern Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). “Because so many of us who teach in FAS and at the Divinity School have colleagues in developing countries around the world who have great difficulty getting to journals that we take for granted in America and Europe, this kind of initiative has great importance to efforts to open up scholarship globally.”last_img read more

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Tom Brady: CFPB poster boy

first_imgGiven the amount of media attention it has received we must now add NFL Mgmt. Council v. NFL Players Ass’n, to the annals of watershed cases like Brown v. Board of Education, Roe v. Wade, and Bush v. Gore.And, why not? Take away his $20 million annual salary, the four super bowl rings, the super model wife, the phalanx of PR pros and personal assistants with the habit of throwing away cell phones containing important evidence and Tom is an average guy entrapped by a poorly drafted arbitration clause. In fact, Tom’s travails demonstrate why the CFPB is half right but all wrong when it comes to reforming arbitration clauses.First, some background. Pre-arbitration clauses are common in many consumer contracts and an increasing number of account agreements. They bind consumers to resolving disputes through arbitration instead of with a lawsuit including class action lawsuits, a practice upheld by the Supreme Court. Arbitrator decisions are extremely difficult to overturn since a reviewing court is effectively being asked to nullify a binding contract. The reason Tom ultimately lost wasn’t because the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit necessarily believed that he was guilty of conspiring to deflate footballs, which, fortunately for Tom, is no longer a capital offense; rather the court had to decide if the NFL abided by the terms of the arbitration provisions that had been agreed to in the NFL’s Collective Bargaining Agreement. The court was going to defer to the arbitrator’s finding so long as there was any evidence at all to support his conclusions.So what makes Tom a poster boy for the CFPB? Because, whereas Tom Brady has access to the best lawyers to argue his case, the vast majority of consumers signing account agreements and consumer contracts do not. Nevertheless, the law binds consumers to arbitration clauses to the same degree it binds Tom Brady. On some level, this doesn’t seem all that fair. The average consumer is typically in a take it or leave it position with regard to most products or services he buys. They don’t have the ability or inclination to eliminate or modify arbitration clauses.This would be OK but for the fact that, judging by examples uncovered by the CFPB and NY Times, arbitrations t can be grossly unfair. In fact, I’m sure Richard Cordray will be relieved to learn that, even though I continue to believe that arbitration is not one of the country’s major consumer issues -unless you are a plaintiff’s lawyer – he has convinced me that changes could be made to arbitration that better protect consumers.Dodd Frank gave the CFPB the obligation to study arbitration and the power to modify their use (Section 1028). The question is what should these changes be? As I write, the Bureau  is reportedly preparing to propose prohibiting arbitration clauses that bar consumers from joining class action lawsuits. That’s right.  Its solution to solving arbitration abuses is not to reform arbitrations, but to advocate for unlimited consumer access to class action lawsuits.This is where the CFPB goes off the tracks. Class actions do more harm to the economy than do arbitration clauses. There is a time and a place for this type of litigation, but all too often they are used to browbeat businesses into settlements that benefit no one but the attorneys who bring them. Do you remember receiving a threatening letter accusing you of violating federal law because you didn’t post a   transaction fee next to your ATM machines? I find it hard to believe that your members are better off for these threats but the lawyers who prosecuted these lawsuits certainly are.Or, take for instance the recent settlement of a class action lawsuit claiming that Uber violated Labor Laws by classifying drivers as independent contractors. Uber may end up paying $100 million to the whole class, but up to $25 million of that is reportedly going to the class’s law firm and we still have no clear legal guidance about the status of Uber drivers. Let the Heavens Fall so that Justice be Done!Proponents of class actions argue that there are many violations which are only worth suing over if you aggregate them.  But this simply means that the harm to individual consumers is negligible. Besides, government agencies and attorney generals aren’t shy about going after rule breakers.Instead of being fixated with class action lawsuits, the CFPB should mandate baseline requirements that would have to be satisfied for an arbitrator’s decision to be binding.  For example, all arbitrations should be either transcribed or recorded so that there is a record of the proceedings; parties should have no role in picking their arbitrators and the number of arbitrations an arbitrator can oversee involving the same client should be capped to avoid potential conflicts of interest. Finally, when a consumer is not represented by counsel, courts hearing appeals should have a lower legal standard for overturning an arbitration award.We all can’t be Tom Brady, but we all should have some of the protections his wealth affords him. The ultimate goal of arbitration reform should be a fair system for both an aggrieved customer and the institution with which he is doing business. To me, it makes perfect sense for credit unions and banks to control legal costs with arbitration. It also makes sense to make sure that arbitration is fair to all sides in a dispute. 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Henry Meier As General Counsel for the New York Credit Union Association, Henry is actively involved in all legislative, regulatory and legal issues impacting New York credit unions. Whether he’s joining … Web: www.nycua.org Detailslast_img read more

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East Norwich Man Charged With Stabbing Wife to Death

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York An man was arrested for stabbing his 61-year-old wife to death in their East Norwich apartment over the weekend, Nassau County police said.Warren M. Ducker was charged with second-degree murder.Homicide Squad detectives said the 67-year-old suspect killed his wife, Wendy Ginsberg-Ducker, in their Pine Hollow Road home, where officers responding to a report of a medical emergency found her dead at 1:40 p.m. Sunday.The husband was taken to a local hospital for treatment of non-life threatening injuries. He was scheduled to be arraigned Tuesday.last_img

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Bali fights virus same way it attracts tourists – with local customs

first_imgIndonesia’s most popular tourist destination, Bali, has its local customs to thank for what officials tout as success in containing the COVID-19 outbreak, as the central government mulls reopening the resort island.As of Tuesday, Bali had reported 407 cases of infection with 295 recoveries and four deaths – some of the lowest fatality figures in the entire country. Most of the cases were recorded in the capital of Denpasar, as well as in Buleleng and Bangli regencies.The province, home to some 4.2 million people, reported its first confirmed case of COVID-19 on March 11, despite still welcoming its typical crowds of tourists in the early months of the pandemic. Unlike other provinces, however, Bali does not publicly disclose the number of patients under surveillance (PDP) or people under observation (ODP), fueling doubt over the veracity of its official figures.PDP and ODP figures refer to people who are suspected of having contracted the disease but who are still awaiting test results or are about to get tested.”It’s important to know the number of ODP and PDP to see how good the government has been in detecting cases,” said I Made Ady Wirawan, the head of Udayana University’s School of Public Health.“It might show the true number [of cases].” Ady said that Bali had not been testing enough people for its methods to be deemed reliable, an issue facing many other provinces nationwide.As of May 21, Bali had only tested 8,116 samples, with more than one sample possibly taken from a single person, according to a virtual briefing by the Bali administration on Friday.And while he warned of possible undetected cases from asymptomatic carriers, Ady said there had yet to be reports of an unusual spike in deaths among patients treated for COVID-19 in Bali’s hospitals.Bali’s successful containment efforts have largely been attributed to the active role played by traditional villages, which make up the majority of the island’s settlements, as the majority of people are Hindus who comply with local religious customs.The island’s authorities have not resorted to imposing the large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) seen elsewhere in the country and have instead relied on the island’s 1,493 traditional villages to restrict people’s movements, which Bali Governor I Wayan Koster insisted had been a success.The villages have a well-defined leadership structure, complete with pecalang (traditional guards), who work voluntarily in the service of the people – known as ngayah in Balinese culture.Village leaders and the pecalang are tasked with screening visitors seeking to enter the villages, monitoring people in quarantine, preventing large gatherings and making sure people follow health protocols, such as wearing masks and washing their hands frequently.Those who violate the rules could face social sanctions that are perceived negatively by the Balinese people, said Jero Mangku Widiarta, the head of Besakih village, home to the island’s largest and most important Hindu temple, Besakih Temple.“Bali without its guests is a pandemic in itself. […] That’s why the Balinese people are compliant with the existing protocols – so the guests will return sooner,” Jero said.The Balinese are known for being very compliant with the local customs enforced by traditional villages, mainly because they are very old, said Wayan P. Windia, a customary law professor at Udayana University.The villages have been around for centuries, even before the Netherlands conquered the region in 1908. One inscription from 891 AD even acknowledges their existence and importance in Balinese culture.”People in traditional villages are bonded through sakala [reality] and through niskala [Hindu beliefs],” he said.It was only in a 2019 regional government regulation on traditional villages that these social units were recognized administratively.Meanwhile, Coordinating Maritime Affairs and Investment Minister Luhut Pandjaitan said earlier this month that the government had considered reopening the economy in Bali and four other regions, citing a plateauing of COVID-19 infections.Bali’s losses in the tourism sector are estimated to total around Rp 9.7 trillion per month, according to the administration, as global restrictions on movement pummeled the industry that contributes to around 60 percent of the province’s gross regional product.According to Indonesian Tourist Industry Association (GIPI) data, Bali recorded an 11 percent year-on-year increase in foreign tourist arrivals in January, before arrivals dropped 18 percent in February, a further 42.32 percent in March and 93.24 percent in April.Bali Deputy Governor Tjokorda Oka Sukawati said in an online discussion in April that the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic had been even worse than past disasters, including the deadly 2002 and 2005 Bali bombings, when the informal sector had helped keep the economy afloat.While confidence remains high that the province will keep infections under control, Ady of Udayana University warned against lifting restrictions too early for fear of a second, more severe, wave of infections, given that the rate of local transmission was still climbing.Local health authorities have raised concerns over the rising number of cases stemming from local transmissions, as it was previously thought that the majority of cases were imported, including by returning migrant workers.As of Monday, local transmissions accounted for 42.17 percent of total cases, with 67 out of 97 active cases still receiving treatment at seven hospitals and quarantine facilities. New clusters of local transmissions recently emerged in at least three villages.”When more tests are carried out and fewer cases are found, then confidence in the ‘new normal’ will increase. At that time, intervention will shift from community-based to case-based,” Ady said. “But for now, testing and tracing must be improved.”Topics :last_img read more

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