Moldovan journalist to complain to European Court of Human Rights about being refused entry

first_img May 28, 2021 Find out more BelarusEurope – Central Asia BelarusEurope – Central Asia News May 27, 2021 Find out more to go further RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” News Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts Organisation center_img “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF says Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown читать на русскомMoldovan journalist Natalia Morar has decided to complain to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg after being prevented from entering Russia for the second time on 27 February. Morar was based in Moscow until she was denied entry for the first time on her return from a trip abroad on 16 December.“We support this initiative by Morar and we hope the European Court of Human Rights will order the Russian authorities to explain their grounds for not letting her into the country,” the press freedom organisation said. “Morar works for an independent Russian newspaper and she just wants to continue doing her job.”When Morar was again denied entry on arriving in Moscow’s Domodedovo airport with her Russian husband on a flight from the Moldovan capital of Chisinau on 27 February, she spent three days in the airport’s transit area before returning to Moldova.Morar told Reporters Without Borders: “Several articles of the European Convention on Human Rights have been violated. A family cannot be separated, which is what has happened to me. Furthermore, during those three days in Domodedovo airport, they denied my basic rights by not giving me water and food. And they have not notified me of the reasons for this second refusal.”Since Morar’s return to Chisinau, her mother has received two anonymous calls in the middle of the night. “Your daughter is taking too many liberties, this will finish badly,” the first caller said. “You know, they are going to get rid of your daughter,” the second caller said, a few days later.“This is a classical tactic of psychological pressure on my mother,” Morar said. “She felt ill and emergency services had to be called.” Morar reported the threatening phone calls to the police, who promised to find out who was making them. News RSF_en June 2, 2021 Find out more News March 12, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Moldovan journalist to complain to European Court of Human Rights about being refused entry Follow the news on Belaruslast_img read more

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Paul McCartney Adds U.S. Summer Tour Dates

first_imgSir Paul McCartney has added four U.S. tour dates to a previously announced batch of North American dates. McCartney will start 2019 out with four South American dates in March, followed by 12 U.S. performances starting on March 23rd.The newly added U.S. tour dates will see McCartney play Green Bay, WI’s Lambeau Field for the first time ever on June 8th, followed by stops at Arlington, TX’s Globe Life Park (6/14); San Diego, CA’s Petco Park (6/22); and Los Angeles, CA’s Dodger Stadium (7/13).In September, McCartney released his newest studio album, Egypt Station. Following months of promotion, the release was celebrated with a full-tilt NYC-centered promo push that included a performance on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, special limited-edition MetroCards, and a “secret” intimate performance at Grand Central Terminal, which was webcast for free to thousands across the world.Tickets to the Green Bay show go on sale beginning December 10th, with tickets to the other three shows available starting December 13th here.Paul McCartney 2019 Tour Dates:*newly added dates bolded03/20 – Santiago, CL @ National Stadium03/23 – Buenos Aires, AR @ Polo Ground03/26 – Sao Paulo, BR @ Allianz Parque03/30 – Curitiba, BR @ Estadio Couto Pereira05/23 – New Orleans, LA @ Smoothie King Arena05/27 – Raleigh, NC @ PNC Arena05/30 – Greenville, SC @ Bon Secours Wellness Arena06/01 – Lexington, KY @ Rupp Arena06/03 – Fort Wayne, IN @ Allen County War Memorial Coliseum06/06 – Madison, WI @ Kohl Center06/08 – Green Bay, WI @ Lambeau Field06/11 – Moline, IL @ TaxSlayer Center06/14 – Arlington TX @ Globe Life Park06/22 – San Diego, CA @ Petco Park06/26 – Phoenix, AZ @ Talking Stick Resort Arena07/13 – Los Angeles, CA @ Dodger StadiumView All Tour Dates[H/T Consequence of Sound]last_img read more

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Main Cocaine Supplier for Los Zetas is Captured

first_img In September, Marines in San Luis Potosí captured Iván Velásquez Caballero, alias “El Talibán” and “Z-50.” The most important incident took place on October 7, when a team of Marines killed Los Zetas kingpin Heriberto Lazcano Lazcano, alias “The Executioner,” during a gun battle in Progreso, Coahuila. Argentinean authorities recently captured an alleged drug trafficker who was reportedly a key cocaine supplier for Los Zetas in Buenos Aires. The alleged drug trafficker used multiple identities to move about in Argentina, Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Uruguay. Official sources reported he usually traveled with bodyguards. According to the Colombian news daily, Argentinean security forces followed “Mi Sangre” after planting a sophisticated tracking device in one of his cars. At least 10 Los Zetas leaders have been captured or killed since 2009, authorities said. By Dialogo November 23, 2012 Carlos Ramírez Acosta, a security analyst and head of Prisma Consulting firm, based in Mexico City, said that cooperation between countries battling transnational criminal organizations is increasing. This has resulted in “a significant exchange of information at the intelligence level,” which contributes to the arrests of drug traffickers, the analyst added. “Mi Sangre” is wanted in Colombia and in the United States for cocaine trafficking. On October 30, Argentinean security forces arrested Henry de Jesús López Londoño, a Colombian national who is also known as “Mi Sangre,” “Salvador,” and “Carlos Mario,” in a Buenos Aires supermarket, when he was with his wife and 10 bodyguards, according to news reports. Though the capture of “Mi Sangre” will hurt the cocaine trafficking operations of Los Zetas, it will not cripple it, according to Ramírez Acosta. The capture of “Mi Sangre” is a “temporary limitation,” the security analyst reflected, because the transnational criminal organization will turn to other suppliers. From the 1990s through 2005, “Mi Sangre” was a lieutenant to Colombian drug kingpin Diego Fernando Murillo, alias “Don Berna,” who in turn led Colombian drug cartel Oficina de Envigado. In 2005, “Don Berna” surrendered to Colombian authorities, while in 2008 he was extradited to the United States, where he plead guilty to cocaine trafficking charges and was sentenced to 31 years in prison. The transnational criminal organization has “suffered serious blows in the last months: loss of territory, capture or death of (its) regional leaders and internal fighting for the control of the organization,” according to a Mexican Military report titled “National Strategy against Organized Crime and its Impact on National Security.” For more than a decade, “Mi Sangre,” was one of the leaders of Los Urabeños, a Colombian paramilitary group which engages in drug trafficking, said authorities, adding that he had met with Los Zetas operatives the day before his arrest. In October, Marines in Coahuila captured Salvador Alfonso Martínez Escobedo, alias “The Squirrel,” who is suspected of ordering the massacre of 72 migrants in Tamaulipas in August 2010. The capture of “Mi Sangre” is the latest in a series of blows against Los Zetas. In addition to killing The Executioner, the Mexican Armed Forces and Federal Police have captured several key Los Zetas operatives in recent months: According to Colombian daily El Tiempo, cooperation between security forces from Colombia, Argentina and the United States led to the arrest of “Mi Sangre.” Before his capture, he was the “main cocaine supplier” for Los Zetas, said General José Roberto León, the chief of Colombia’s National Police. In July, Marines in the city of Puebla captured William de Jesús Torres Solórzano, a.k.a. “The Worm Eater” and “El W,” who is suspected of being a key financial operator for Los Zetas. The Worm Eater was allegedly responsible for trafficking drugs from Guatemala to the United States, according to authorities.last_img read more

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Colombian Navy, Air Force Work Together to Combat Drug Trafficking

first_imgBy Marian Romero/Diálogo August 09, 2016 Joint operations run by Colombia’s Navy and Air Force (FAC, for its Spanish acronym) have become an effective in shutting down drug trafficking routes. In just two operations in June, authorities seized more than a metric ton of cocaine hydrochloride in different areas of Colombia’s territorial waters in the Caribbean. Colombian Navy intelligence, together with information from U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) allowed Coast Guard stations in the cities of Santa Marta and Cartagena to interdict the vessels in one operation. However, in both instances, the FAC’s 3rd Combat Air Command guided the Navy’s rapid response units from the air. “Partnering with the FAC has been very beneficial because it provides intelligence from the air that would be slower and less precise from the water. The surveillance area that an aircraft can cover is 10 times larger than that of a ship. It also provides the exact coordinates of the suspicious vessel’s location, which makes for more efficient interdictions,” said Admiral Leonardo Santamaría, commander of the Colombian Navy. Adm. Santamaria explained that the armed forces of all affected countries have had to work together in the fight against international drug trafficking in order to comprehensively manage the situation and prevent the so-called balloon effect – in which the air within a latex balloon that is squeezed moves to a different area but never goes away – with crop eradication and drug trafficking suppression in Latin America. So far this year, the joint operations between the Navy and the FAC have resulted in the immobilization of nine vessels. This contributed to the Navy seizing a total of 72 metric tons of alkaloids to date in all of its operations, with and without the support of other institutions. FAC Support Because Colombia’s coasts front both the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean, the immense maritime space under the responsibility of the Navy led to the need for the partnership. The Colombian Navy and the FAC first began working together on naval interdiction operations in 2007. Since then, the collaboration has grown stronger. Although the success of the joint collaboration is not evident in the number of detained vessels each year due to current data not yet showing a specific trend, the communication methodology and logistics make this partnership an important strategy to combat drug trafficking. “The illegal use of airspace to traffic drugs has dropped by 99 percent, so a decision was made to include missions against illegal maritime traffic as one of the points of the FAC’s doctrine,” explained Colonel Iván Darío Bocanegra, director of FAC Air Defense. “This change has optimized our airspace use and allowed us to increase our use of the means and resources available to carry out national defense operations.” The Air Bridge Denial Agreement between the FAC and the U.S. Government concerning illicit air trafficking interdiction took effect in 2003. Known as the ABD Agreement, it allowed authorities to track and analyze aerial targets, disable illegal airstrips used by drug traffickers, among other strategies, which, in turn, led to the almost 100 percent elimination of airborne drug trafficking. With this positive outcome, the agreement was expanded in 2007 to include FAC air resources in support of suppressing illegal maritime trafficking of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances, known as SSIMT. Naval interdiction is the process of boarding, inspecting, and searching a vessel suspected of engaging in illegal activity. If the suspicion is confirmed, the people on board the vessel are arrested and the illegal cargo is seized. The Colombian Navy is responsible for this part of the operation. The intelligence work is carried out by the Navy, although it can also be performed by the police or U.S. Southern Command. Based on that information, the FAC flies over a specific section of the ocean to find the illegal vessel from the air, whether it is a go-fast boat or a semi-submersible. Once the target has been sighted, the pilot relays the exact coordinates and acts as a guide for a Navy vessel to perform the interdiction. “The operations are performed as discreetly as possible. We fly high enough that we generate no noise that could alert the criminals. Usually, when they feel cornered, they throw the merchandise overboard to reduce their sentence,” Col. Bocanegra explained. “The success of the SSIMT operations lies in the communication between all armed forces involved and in the coordination orchestrated by the Colombian Navy.” Patrolling Both Oceans “Historically, drugs have primarily been trafficked by sea. Outlaws have preferred to travel by sea, even though it takes much longer than an aircraft, because it allows them to carry more weight at less cost,” Adm. Santamaría said. “A go-fast boat can be loaded down with 1.5 metric tons and a semi-submersible with 6 metric tons, but an airplane can only carry a few kilograms. That is why most of the problems occur at sea.” The Colombian Air Force is not the only organization patrolling the vast maritime space. It also has the support of all Central American countries and of the United States. Defense accords focused on combating drug trafficking have made it possible to achieve more effective control. The challenge for these operations is to continue to standardize doctrine and provide training as needed to task forces to carry out increasingly precise interdictions as well as to reduce the amount of drugs trafficked by sea. “With the momentum of the accords we have been implementing for several years now, we’ve set up effective fronts for neutralizing the criminals’ vessels. We have created doctrinal unity and a network of resources has been set up to tactically detect enemies,” Adm. Santamaría said. “Each interdiction operation draws on the resources available along the illegal vessel’s route. It could be an aircraft from one country, a boat or ship from another and so on, until the final mission is completed.”last_img read more

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Board candidates present their views, qualifications

first_imgBoard candidates present their views, qualifications 13th Circuit, Seat 1 Following are the platform statements of the nine Florida Bar members running for the four contested seats in the 2002 Board of Governors elections.Ballots will be mailed to Bar members in circuits with contested races on or around February 26 and must be returned to the Bar’s election company no later than midnight March 21. If a runoff results from the three-way Fourth Circuit race, those ballots will be mailed in April.For the second year, Bar members will have the option of voting by the traditional paper ballot or casting their ballot electronically via the Internet. Complete instructions for electronic voting, along with the necessary passwords, will be included with the ballots.All the races are for two-year terms, except for the 15th Circuit. That is a new seat resulting from the board’s recent reapportionment and will initially have a one-year term.Winners of the election, as well as new and returning board members elected without opposition, will be sworn in during the Bar’s Annual Meeting in June. Fourth Circuit, Seat 1 For almost 28 years I have enjoyed the privilege of practicing here in the 17th Judicial Circuit and serving its legal community though various positions with the Broward County Bar Association. As my term as its president ends this June, I would welcome the challenge of continuing the representation of its members, as well as all Broward lawyers, on the Board of Governors. Practice area: Principal in the firm of Ferencik, Libanoff, Brandt and Bustamante, P.A, which is predominantly devoted to the representation of construction industry clientele. Bar-related experience: Member, The Florida Board of Bar Examiners (1998-2003). Member, various sections of The Florida Bar since 1974. President, Broward County Bar Association (2001-2002); President-elect (2000-2001); Secretary-Treasurer (1999-2000); Board of Directors (1995-1999); founder and chair, Construction Law Section (1993-1995). Co-chapter author, Florida Bar publications: Florida Construction Law and Practice (1st and 2nd Editions). Outline author and lecturer for six Florida Bar seminars. Outline author and lecturer for five Lorman seminars Civic: Alternate, City of Fort Lauderdale Board of Adjustment (1993-1995). Adjunct Instructor, Florida International University, Department of Construction Management. Objectives: Along with the other well-regarded 17th Judicial Circuit Governors, I would like to provide an additional voice for our Broward lawyers in and about the important issues confronting our profession. Like most attorneys, I find that the independence of our judiciary and self-regulation are perhaps the most compelling issues now confronting our profession. I would like to again advocate trial court merit selection and retention, which seems to have won some new converts despite its resounding defeat at the polls. The continuing debates about the efficacy of multidisciplinary and multijurisdictional practices should be of significant and urgent concern to all Florida lawyers. I have both the enthusiasm and work ethic to make meaningful contributions on those and other issues affecting our profession and would respectfully invite your support.Leigh C. Katzman Alan C. (Peter) Brandt, Jr. It has been an honor and a privilege to work with, and represent the attorneys of the Fourth Judicial Circuit through Bar leadership activities in the past. I now ask for your support and vote so that I may serve as your representative on the Florida Bar Board of Governors, Fourth Judicial Circuit, Seat One. I pledge to continue my history of service and hard work on behalf of the judges and attorneys of this community. Service to the Bar Jacksonville Bar Association — President and held every other elected position. Jacksonville Trial Lawyers Association — President and held every other elected position. Jacksonville Bar Association Young Lawyers — President and held every other elected position. The Florida Bar Fourth Judicial Circuit Grievance Committee D — Chairman. The Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers — Board of Governors — current. American Board of Trial Advocates. Master of the Bench — Chester Bedell Inn of Court. Fourth Judicial Circuit Fee Arbitration Committee. The Florida Bar — Code and Rules of Evidence Committee. Florida Supreme Court Committee on the Standards of Conduct of Judges. Board Certified Civil Trial Lawyer — 1991; recertified in 1996 and 2001. Served on the boards of numerous charitable community organizations. Objectives for Board Service: The responsibilities of The Florida Bar Board of Governors are extremely broad and varied. They change each year as new issues arise. As such, it would be a mistake to have a specific stated agenda. However, in all of the actions I take as a member of the Board of Governors, my work and votes will be governed by three criteria:1. Are we acting to protect the independence of the judiciary and the Bar?2. Do our actions support or improve the quality of legal services in this state while minimizing the “Bar” intrusion into our day-to-day practices?3. Because The Florida Bar is a mandatory unified Bar, all segments of our Bar must have proper representation and an opportunity to be heard.I wish to continue my hard work on behalf of this community, its attorneys, and the judiciary. I would appreciate your support and your vote for The Florida Bar Board of Governors — Fourth Judicial Circuit, Seat One.Terrence E. Schmidt I think the members of the Bar in this circuit who know Tommy Edwards, Grier Wells, and me hopefully know any one of the three of us would be an effective representative on the Board of Governors. So, I gather the purpose for requiring platform statements is to furnish information to members of the Bar who may not know the candidates themselves.I have practiced law here since 1973. I started with the old Mahoney Hadlow firm in 1973, became a shareholder in 1978, and left with Jim Bledsoe and others to start our own firm on January 1, 1979. Jim and I have practiced together ever since. I have specialized primarily in the area of commercial litigation but have also represented plaintiffs and defendants in personal injury and employment litigation. We have had as few as two and as many as 10 lawyers in the firm at various times. The firm presently includes Steve Moonly, Cheryl Roberson, Chris Cobb, Jim, and me. Our most recent ex-shareholders and associates are Harold Lippes, Lep Adams, and Courtney Grimm. They left the firm for different reasons, but I would encourage anyone who knows them but doesn’t know me to ask them about me. One of my proudest accomplishments is that lawyers who have left the firm continue to be friends.Approximately four years ago, I became a certified circuit court and federal court mediator and AAA arbitrator and mediator, and that part of my practice has continually grown. As a result, I essentially stopped taking new litigation cases a year ago and have been transitioning from a litigation practice to a full-time mediation/arbitration practice since then.I served a three-year term on Grievance Committee A and was chairman last year. I am presently a member of the Judicial Nominating Commission for the Fourth Judicial Circuit. I have been appointed as Special Counsel to the Grievance Committee for the United States Federal District Court for the Middle District of Florida and acted as Special Counsel to The Florida Bar with staff counsel in the F. Lee Bailey disbarment proceeding. I am a Master in the Chester Bedell Inn of Court and a Barrister in the American College of Barristers.Until the Bailey disbarment proceeding, I never thought other lawyers were particularly impressed with what I thought or had to say. Since the Bailey case, some lawyers are at least interested in what happened in that case. At the same time, I think I have developed some decent consensus-building skills as a mediator, which would be beneficial in dealing with issues that come before the Board of Governors.Frankly, I don’t think either the Bar or the Board of Governors needs a major overhaul. I believe the level of professionalism has increased substantially due largely to the past efforts of John DeVault, Howard Coker, and others on the Board of Governors. I believe those efforts need to continue. I also think the Board of Governors is on the right track in vigorously resisting efforts to politicize the selection of judges and transfer lawyer discipline to a legislatively established administrative body and believe my past experiences on the grievance committee and judicial nominating commission and as counsel to the Bar can make me an effective spokesperson regarding those issues. Finally, I obviously believe in alternative dispute resolution and would encourage the Board of Governors to actively advocate more cost-effective ways of resolving disputes, particularly those in which the cost of the litigation process can quickly exceed the amount in controversy.S. Grier Wells February 1, 2002 Regular News Board candidates present their views, qualifications There are always a multitude of issues facing our profession. Terry Russell, our Florida Bar president, spoke about several of these issues at the recent January luncheon of our Jacksonville Bar Association. Like chads and pretzels, you never know where they may come from. These issues are viewed by each of us with differing levels of primacy.There are two issues which are foremost in my mind and which must be dealt with on an increasing level of attention by the Bar. Professionalism is an ever-present issue and in one form or another always has been. A more recent issue in the last several years is the advent of multidisciplinary practice within the Bar. Both issues present changing faces to the Bar, and it is the manner in which we deal with the changes which will measure our leadership.We can all be proud that the bar of the Fourth Judicial Circuit is probably the leader in Florida in advancing professionalism. What once was considered second nature in the Fourth Judicial Circuit is now essentially codified elsewhere. We are dealing with professionalism issues with greater frequency than ever before, even in our part of the world. Our traditional continuing legal education requirements in ethics are now coupled with professionalism. It is simply imperative that as the practice of law grows and changes, we constantly strive to maintain and even improve upon our professionalism. We must balance aggressive representation with the need for fairness, honesty, and courtesy, recognizing we are not just lawyers, but officers of the court.With the growth and changes in the practice of law, we must confront the concept of multidisciplinary practices. We all know that it has been openly common in other countries for years and the effort to legitimize it is gaining momentum here. Without editorializing, it may be analogized to several physical phenomena such as avalanches and dams bursting. It must be addressed because it will necessarily involve us all in ways yet unimaginable. Certainly there are features of it that are both good and bad. It is probable that features of multidisciplinarism may be behind the fall of Enron. Conversely, there are stories yet to be told in which multidisciplinary practices have achieved good. It is the responsibility of the Bar leadership to achieve balanced caution in our response.I have cited balance as an objective in dealing with these issues. As a former member of the Jacksonville Bar Association Board of Governors and a past president of the association, a charter member of the Jacksonville Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates, a practicing litigator for over 26 years, a mediator, a former Volunteer of the Year for the Guardian ad Litem program, and actively involved in numerous community organizations, I feel I can achieve such balance. I would be honored to serve the Fourth Judicial Circuit as a member of the Board of Governors in representing you on these and other issues which face us as lawyers and citizens.On a personal note, I commend both Tom Edwards and Terry Schmidt for their continued commitment to The Florida Bar and to the profession. Both are friends and I am sure that each would make, as would I, an excellent representative to The Florida Bar Board of Governors from the Fourth Judicial Circuit. There can be no losers in this election; the Fourth Judicial Circuit, the Florida Bar, the profession, and the public will all be winners. E. Christopher Abdoney I would be profoundly honored to serve as the representative member of the Florida Bar Board of Governors for the 17th Circuit. If elected, I will use the skills and experience I have gained in my 10 years of practice to represent and further the interests of the attorneys of the 17th Circuit.In 1994 I co-founded Katzman & Korr, a practice primarily devoted to the representation of community associations. As a consequence of my practice area, I have had the unique opportunity to come in contact with many attorneys and a wide variety of non-lawyers. I have witnessed the successful as well as the not-so-successful operation of numerous boards of directors. Accordingly, I believe I know how to competently participate in the process and can assist the Board of Governors in continuing to be an effective and relevant entity. Furthermore, as consequence of coming in contact with such a large number of attorneys and non-lawyers alike, I believe I understand how we may better our image with the public and restore the trust and respect that the vast majority of us deserve.I believe The Florida Bar does an outstanding job of self regulation. Publicizing the program to the public and taking steps to ensure that our independence continues is of paramount importance to me. Over the past 10 years, I believe the Bar has improved the continuing legal education process and has made access to ethics opinions significantly easier. My belief is that the system can be improved further by encouraging lawyer participation and promoting professionalism between ourselves.Even in the litigation arena, if our clients and the public at large see us treating each other with respect and dignity while still vigorously pursuing our clients’ interests, our image will improve and those who have little confidence in the Bar’s ability to regulate its members independently may reassess that unjustified opinion. If we demonstrate respect for each other and the system in which we practice, our profession will flourish and prosper.If elected, I will work diligently to meet these goals. I thank you for taking the time to read the foregoing and would appreciate your support. Richard B. Kay Do members of The Florida Bar take time out to read statements made by those who challenge the direction and philosophy of The Florida Bar? We hope some read these statements, think about their profession and what they want their Board of Governors to adopt as programs for the future.Some ideas I advocated in previous elections still are not being considered by The Florida Bar. However, I believe if some ideas have some merit, eventually they will be adopted.1. We should do away with the bureaucratic system, sending ads than an attorney wants to try to Tallahassee for approval. Set up rules and guidelines and have enough confidence in professionals to follow them. However, if guidelines are not followed, bring that attorney on the carpet. Note: We should limit advertising by attorneys. No wonder fees are so high for the average citizen.2. The middle class is being punished by increased court costs and the cost for a court reporter at hearings. Court reporters should be furnished by the state. If a client needs to have the proceedings typed up, they would have to pay unless they are in the poverty level.3. Let us continue to advocate that each judge should have a legal assistant for briefs and legal arguments in all cases. One for every three judges is not enough.4. Justice is not being served with the per curiam affirmed rulings in the district courts of appeal. We need additional judges in the district courts. Trial judges, when asked for a written decision in a non-jury trial, should comply.5. Restore designations to various areas of practice, so there’s more than just a certification system of elitists.The Florida Bar spent a great deal of money on radio and TV ads telling how great we are. Instead, we should spend money by having a real survey of the average citizens and find out why the legal profession has such a bad reputation. Then find solutions for the bad reputation.In a recent survey of Palm Beach County attorneys, they responded as follows:1. 62 percent oppose that we do away with the election of trial judges.2. 72 percent were in favor of having court reporters available at all court hearings furnished at county expense.3. 76 percent were in favor of an in-depth study to find out from the public why they dislike attorneys.4. 72 percent were in favor of each trial judge having a legal assistant.5. 76 percent wanted the bar association to continue its efforts to do away with per curiam affirmed decisions.A few final propositions that should be considered by The Florida Bar:1. Will our society benefit more if we repeal the no-fault divorce law?2. Is there something wrong with our system when only four seats for the Board of Governors in the entire state are being contested?3. Is the growing influence of the large firms, that are getting bigger and bigger, a threat to the existence of the solo practicing attorney?Your vote would be appreciated.Amy L. Smith 15th Circuit, Seat 4 I am a member of both The Florida Bar and the Georgia State Bar. Once admitted to the Bar, I practiced law as a prosecutor in the 13th Judicial Circuit, Hillsborough County, Florida. In 1997, I entered private practice as a solo practitioner. Since then, I have handled numerous cases in a variety of areas including criminal defense in federal and state court, civil litigation, both plaintiff and defense, family law, mental health, probate, juvenile, administrative, and also some appeals. At the same time, I managed the business affairs of my office and maintained a busy daily court schedule representing clients at various types of hearings and trials. In addition, I have served on the Hillsborough County Bar Law Week Committee giving courthouse tours to students during Law Week. I have also visited various middle schools during the “Great American Teach-In” to speak to students regarding the legal profession. My clients and my peers know me to be a zealous advocate for my clients, but not one to over-litigate issues or file frivolous claims.One function of the board is to nominate and appoint lawyers to certain committees and different entities within the Bar as well as nominations to the governor of Florida for vacancies on the judicial nominating commissions around the state. My goal on the board will be to recommend members of the Bar who are most qualified to effectively represent our interests on the various committees. Regarding JNC appointments, I will support the most qualified member for the job while striving to make sure the 13th Judicial Circuit is adequately represented on the 2nd District Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court of Florida. This is important to our circuit’s members, given the fact that we have one of the heaviest appellate case loads in the state.If elected to the 13th Circuit seat for the Board of Governors, I will make it my goal to diligently represent the interests of all Bar members in this circuit, regardless of whether they are members of the largest firms or are solo practitioners. As your elected representative, I promise to be available to listen to any concerns you may have and entertain your input concerning matters to be dealt with by the Board of Governors. The ballots should be in your offices by March 1, 2002, and they must be returned by midnight March 21, 2002. I would greatly appreciate your vote and look forward to representing you on the board.Timon V. Sullivan Practice Experience: Civil trial practice involving litigation and trial of personal injury and commercial cases in State and Federal Courts throughout West Central Florida. Years of Practice: 22. Firm: Ogden & Sullivan, P.A., 12-lawyer Tampa firm. Personal Data: Born 1954. Attended Tampa Jesuit High School, Vanderbilt University (B.A. 1976) and University of Florida, Holland Law Center (J.D. 1979). Married to Diana (Olmo) Sullivan; three sons: Chris (17), David (16), Kevin (13). Bar Experience: Hillsborough County Bar Association (HCBA), 1979-present HCBA Young Lawyers Board, 1981-84 HCBA Young Lawyers President, 1985-86 Florida Bar Young Lawyers Section Board of Governors, 1986-89 Florida Bar Trial Lawyers Section Executive Council, 1990-93 HCBA Lawyer Magazine Editor, 1991-92 HCBA Board of Directors, 1989-95 HCBA President, 1993-94 13th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission, 1995-97; chair, 1997 Objective for Board Service: To represent all the lawyers of the 13th Circuit and their diverse interests on the Board of Governors. To provide the lawyers of the 13th Circuit with access to and a voice in the governance of their profession.I have no “agenda” for service on the Board of Governors other than to work hard to see that the best interests of lawyers in our circuit are protected. My principal concerns include the Bar’s continuing effort to deal with multidisciplinary practice issues. MDP is a fact of life in Europe. Soon that may be the case in Florida and the United States unless we continue to be vigilant in protecting our independence as lawyers.Additionally, we must address the lack of diversity in the leadership of The Florida Bar. To truly represent and protect the interests of all Florida lawyers, our Bar leadership must more closely mirror that constituency to the extent possible. I will work to give leadership opportunities to women and minority lawyers who have the time and interest to become involved.During my 22 years of practice, I have been involved in the management of both a large and a small law firm. That valuable experience has helped me gain insight into the economic pressures all Florida lawyers face. The Florida Bar must continue to assist lawyers in meeting the economic challenges presented by competition from other professions and rapidly advancing technology. I would be honored to have the opportunity to represent the 13th Circuit on the Board of Governors, and to ensure The Florida Bar addresses the concerns of all lawyers in our circuit. Palm Beach County has received a fourth seat on the Florida Bar Board of Governors giving us a more proportionate share of input and voting. It is so important to be certain that this circuit’s representatives have the experience, training, and ability to represent our interests with The Florida Bar. We have been fortunate to have some of our finest Bar leaders as our representatives for many years. I am now asking for your vote to make me your fourth representative on the Board of Governors. I not only have the qualifications to serve our circuit, but I have the dedication and enthusiasm that is equally vital.I have had the honor of serving as the president of the Palm Beach County Bar Association this year. Prior to taking this office in June 2001, I held every elected office within the Palm Beach County Bar as well as its Young Lawyers Division during the past 13 years. I am very proud that a 2,600-member association has had the confidence in me to allow me the privilege to serve in all of these leadership roles. I hope this confidence carries over to all members of the 15th Circuit and I will receive your vote in this election.This seat will be a much-desired continuation of my service in The Florida Bar for the 15th Circuit. From 1990 to 1994, I was elected to two terms on the Florida Bar Young Lawyers Division Board of Governors representing this circuit. During that time, I chaired many important committees, including Continuing Legal Education, the Children’s Witness Room Project, Holidays in January, and was an active member of the Long Range Planning Committee. I was also appointed to the Executive Board from 1992 to 1995. Subsequent to my two elected terms, I returned for three years as an ex-officio member of that board serving as secretary, sergeant-at-arms and parliamentarian. One of my proudest achievements was receiving the 1993-1994 award for the Most Outstanding Board Member from my peers.I was a member of the 15th Judicial Circuit Grievance Committee for The Florida Bar from 1995 to 1998, chairing that committee in 1997-1998. I was the vice-chair of The Florida Bar Annual Meeting Committee from 1999-2000. I also accepted an appointment to The Florida Bar Multidisciplinary Practice Committee in 1999-2000 and chaired the committee’s Town Hall Meeting in Miami on January 12, 2000.As has been my practice in both my Palm Beach County and Florida Bar experience, I am a proponent of vision and change, when necessary. As part of the Revitalization Committee of the Palm Beach County Bar, I am currently overseeing the changes implemented by our organization in opening up the leadership roles to a bigger sector of members. I recognized the need for positive change in this regard. The Florida Bar is facing many important issues to our practice which need full and active attention as well as modern ideas and vision. Multidisciplinary practice remains at issue. Multijurisdictional practice is presently being debated. There are members of the legislature who want to see The Florida Bar lose its independence and become governed by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. We need representatives on our Board of Governors who are current with the issues, innovative, and have the ability to think well into the future, for the good of the Bar and all members.I am ready to take on this challenge and give every member of the circuit my absolute promise that I will serve you to the best of my abilities. I hope by reviewing my credentials you will recognize that my commitment to Bar service is effectively my “second job.” My “regular job” is with Walton, Lantaff, Schroeder & Carson, a firm established in 1934 with offices in Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, and Tampa. I am a senior partner with the firm’s West Palm Beach office where I have been since 1989. Prior to my civil litigation experience with the firm, I was an assistant state attorney in Palm Beach County for two years. I am fortunate to have the support of my partners and associates who have generously allowed me the significant time away from the office to carry out the duties and responsibilities of the local and state bar associations.While I am asking you to vote for me, I ask this based on a review of hard facts and my credentials. I have earned and established the credibility that will help me make a positive difference on the Board of Governors. However, most importantly, I urge every member to please cast their vote in this important election. Your opinion matters! 17th Circuit, Seat 1 Thomas S. Edwardslast_img read more

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Long Island Labor Day Weekend 2014 Events

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York With this weekend unofficially marking the end of summer—fall technically starts Sept. 22—Labor Day festivities are the last chance for Long Islanders to revel in peak beach season.What better way to celebrate a holiday—held the first Monday of every September—that honors the achievements of American workers then by spending the last weekend of summer relaxing?We’ve compiled this list of ideas to do just that. Instead of running out the clock on summer BBQ hopping as usual, mix it up with something different this Labor Day, like any one of these local events.Shinnecock Pow-WowTribal dances, ceremonies, crafts, storytelling, native foods, demonstrations, dance and drum competitions followed by a fire lighting at sunset. Shinnecock Reservation, Southampton, shinnecocknation.com. $12, $10 for seniors and kids ages 6-11. Kids 5 and younger free. 5-11 p.m., Aug. 29. 10 a.m.-11 p.m., Aug. 30. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 31-Sept. 1.Street Fair on the GreenA unique opportunity to check out some arts and crafts with all the fun of a street fair but in the middle of Nassau County’s biggest park. Eisenhower Park, Field 8, East Meadow. nassaucountyny.gov/parks Free. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Aug. 30-31.America’s Love Affair with the MotorcycleThis renowned summer exhibit highlighting the evolution of America’s beloved innovation, the motorcycle, rides off into the sunset on Tumbleweed Tuesday. The Ward Melville Heritage Organization, 97P Main Street, Stony Brook. stonybrookvillage.com $4, $2 for children under 12. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., through Sept. 1.Seaford Summer FestivalArts and crafts, gifts and food aplenty. Long Island Rail Road station, Seaford. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Aug. 30- Sept. 1. TR & ConservationA special nature walk to celebrate the President Theodore Roosevelt’s crusade for American wilderness and this year’s 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act of 1964. Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, 20 Sagamore Hill Rd., Oyster Bay. nps.gov/sahi Free.1 p.m., Aug. 30.Westhampton Beach 6th Annual Festival of the ArtsThe lawn across from St. Mark’s Church will blossom with artwork brought to Westhampton Beach by a spectacular cast of national and international artists that will weave a tapestry of extraordinary original artwork. Westhampton Great Lawn Great Lawn, Main Street, Westhampton Beach. paragonartevents.com/westhamptom. Free. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Aug. 30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 31.Faith, Food and Fellowship FestivalChildren’s activities, Chinese auction, flea market, 50/50 raffle, Greek/Slavic café and live Balalaika band. Holy Trinity Orthodox Church, 369 Green Ave., East Meadow. htocem.org Free. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Aug. 30.Old Time Music WeekendHonoring the American soldiers, a Brass Military band will perform, along with popular music from the Civil War time period. Visitors may also enjoy learning traditional 1800s contra dancing, while listening to the music. Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Rd., Old Bethpage. nassaucountyny.gov/parks $10, $7 seniors, firefighters and kids ages 5-12. Kids under 5 free. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Aug.30-31Backyard BBQKosher BBQ with an unlimited buffet. Chabad of East Hampton, 13 Woods Lane, East Hampton. JewishHamptons.com $30, $15 kids. 4-8 p.m., Aug. 31.1960s Dance in the BarnA groovy way to give a peace sign to this summer of love. Shelter Island Historical Society, 16 South Ferry Road Haven’s Barn, Shelter Island. shelterislandhistorical.org $5. 8-10 p.m., Aug. 30.Pirates & Mermaids Dance PartyShiver your timbers. Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum, 301 Main Street Route 25A, Cold Spring Harbor, cshwhalingmuseum.org Free with museum admission. 12-3 p.m., Aug. 31.Pig RoastThis BBQ with Wolffer Wines is held every Sunday in summer through September, meaning this is the last chance to get in on the action. One Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton. toppingrosehouse.com $95. 6 p.m., Aug.31.Lamb RoastAll-you-can-eat buffet with live music by Alfredo Merat and Radio Europa with a whole lamb roasted Asado—a Latin American grill technique where you roast meat on a grill or open fire. The Living Room, 207 Main St., East Hampton. themaidstone.com/restaurant  $75, 50 percent off for children under 12. 4 p.m., Sept. 1.Splish SplashLong Island’s lone water park closes on Labor Day, so ride the waves one last time before the party’s over. Splish Splash Water Park, 2549 Splish Splash Dr., Calverton splishsplash.com $41, $31 for those shorter than 48-inches tall. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., through Sept. 1.last_img read more

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7 Threats to your credit union’s downtime lurking below the surface

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » by: Matt WilhelmThe importance of data backup & business continuity can’t be overstated, especially when one of the most common threats to downtime is all around you, moving through your branches and data centers at this very moment. The Aberdeen Group identified the 7 leading threats to your credit union’s downtime are, in order, as follows:Network outagesHuman errorServer failuresStorage failuresApplication errorsPower outagesUsage spikes/surgesBeing near that fault zone or flood zone may not be as risky as expected… the human zone knows no bounds when it comes to data. Even with top-notch hardware and protection, you can still be vulnerable.When you take in the average cost of downtime at $163,674 per hour, according to the Aberdeen Group, having a backup plan is more important than just a safety net. Aside from outages, errors, and failures, there’s the ever-looming threat of malicious attacks on your data. Whether it’s in the form of malware, phishing, or exploited applications, breaches are still a very real threat.last_img read more

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NAFCU-member CU on 2020 Fed council

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Faheem Masood, president and CEO of NAFCU-member ESL Federal Credit Union (Rochester, N.Y.), has been selected to serve on the Federal Reserve’s Community Depository Institutions Advisory Council (CDIAC) for 2020.The CDIAC meets twice a year with the Federal Reserve Board in Washington. It advises the Fed on the economy, lending conditions and other issues. Members are from banks, thrift institutions and credit unions serving on local advisory councils at the 12 Federal Reserve Banks.NAFCU works closely with the Federal Reserve to share insights into credit unions’ operations. Members of NAFCU’s Board of Directors met with Federal Reserve Board Governor Michelle Bowman in November to share findings from the association’s Annual Report on Credit Unions report and discuss other industry trends.last_img read more

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Take a virtual tour of Owego’s historic Evergreen Cemetery

first_imgThe virtual tour can be found on the Experience Tioga website, or by clicking here. It was established in 1851, meant to be a park-like setting. “If you wanted to explore the cemetery along our suggested walking path, you can enable this feature, and a little blue dot shows your location so you can get a sense of place,” said Small Town 360 owner David Coleman. Tioga County Tourism partnered with Small Town 360 to create the web app, available at your fingertips. Many people choose to walk the grounds, learning the names of some of the people who shaped Tioga County. The virtual tour features the biographies of more than 120 people, whereas the walking tour brochure only featured a couple of dozen. It helps locals learn about their past. “A place to get away from the hustle and bustle of the town,” said Town of Owego historian Peter Gordon. It gives you the opportunity to learn about some of the significant people who were laid to rest there. OWEGO (WBNG) — The Evergreen Cemetery overlooks the Village of Owego and sits right outside the railroad tracks. “The printed walking tour brochure which is in full color would have cost us about $5,000. The virtual tour cost us $2,000,” said Gordon. Opening up the doors for new information about the history that lives in our own backyard. “The digital version is just so expansive that you don’t have those limitations,” said Coleman. “Remembering their family, we’ve already had corrections from one of the family members and it actually helps correct local history,” said Gordon. The virtual tour isn’t just fun for history buffs. “I personally think it makes no sense to retain all of these historic documents and photos in an archive that is not accessible to the public,” said Coleman. Now its original walking tour is going virtual.last_img read more

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Opportunities for youth employment through the project “From vocational occupations to the creative industry”

first_imgFrom 7 to 12 May, a cultural and artistic workshop will be held at the Vukovar City Museum and the Museum of Vučedol Culture, as part of the project “From professional occupations to the creative industry”, which is carried out by the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb. The project was co-financed from the European Social Fund in the amount of HRK 670.900,43 (85%) and HRK 118.394,20 (15%) from the Ministry of Culture. This is a project aimed at empowering the labor market a total of 84 young unemployed people with vocational occupations from Vukovar-Srijem, Sisak-Moslavina, Virovitica-Podravina, Osijek-Baranja, Zagreb County and the City of Zagreb.By getting to know six different museum collections and art workshops in the field of design, they will develop the competencies needed to create new art products under the mentorship of local craftsmen. The results of the process are innovative products based on the reinterpretation of heritage that will be presented in 2019 in five museums collaborating on the project: Archaeological Museum in Zagreb, Museum of Vučedol Culture, Archaeological Museum Osijek, City Museum Virovitica and City Museum Sisak.In addition to these museum institutions, the project associate is also the Croatian Employment Service. The target group is young unemployed people aged 15 to 25, various professional occupations: textile and clothing designer, metallurgy technician, clothing technician, wood technician, goldsmith, ceramicist, carpenter, tailor, seamstress, haberdasher, shoemaker and all other similar production occupations .During the cultural and artistic workshop, the young participants were provided with a hot meal, refreshments during breaks, transportation on the route Vukovar – Vučedol, and the travel costs of arriving in Vukovar were covered. During the six days of the workshops, young participants will get acquainted with museums and their work and will be shown how to achieve successful business cooperation with them. Designers conducting education in the field of art will help participants to develop and implement prototype ideas based on the exhibits of the mentioned museums. Also, young people will have the opportunity to meet local craftsmen and entrepreneurs with whom they will cooperate in the development of their prototypes and thus achieve potential business cooperation in the future.last_img read more

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