Both Georgia Senate races appear headed for runoffs as Senate control hangs in the balance.

first_imgRepublicans were ready to try to harness the grievance among Mr. Trump’s most ardent supporters, hoping that the president’s baseless claims of fraud and a backlash to his potential loss could power them to a win in January. Over the last 24 hours, Ms. Loeffler has repeatedly tweeted support for the president, who is falsely claiming that the election is being illegally stolen from him. Facing such extraordinarily high stakes, both parties were quickly preparing themselves for a nine-week year-end sprint that some estimated could ultimately cost at least another $100 million and put Georgia at the center of the nation’s political fray just two weeks before Inauguration Day.Democrats around the country were already mobilizing to use the contests to complete Mr. Biden’s victory and make possible the liberal agenda on health care, the economy and the environment he ran on.“Change has come to Georgia,” Mr. Ossoff said in a rally in Atlanta on Friday. “And Georgia is a part of the change coming to America.”- Advertisement – If Joseph R. Biden Jr. prevails in winning the White House, his vice president could cast tiebreaking votes to give the party de facto control.- Advertisement – Georgia’s special Senate election has been destined for a runoff since Tuesday, when the Rev. Dr. Raphael Warnock, a Democrat, and Senator Kelly Loeffler, a Republican, emerged as the top two vote-getters in a crowded field vying to replace the retired Senator Johnny Isakson.Democrats would need to win both seats on Jan. 5 — a steep task in a state with deep conservative roots — to draw the Senate to a 50-50 tie, but they were riding a wave of liberal enthusiasm and demographic change that appeared poised to deliver victory in Georgia to a Democratic presidential candidate for the first time since 1992. Ms. Loeffler said that she had donated to a fund fighting for the president’s cause.“Praying for four more years of @realDonaldTrump!” she wrote in another message.With Mr. Trump defying the election results, it was hard to predict how involved he might be in the Senate races. But early Friday morning, he insinuated in a tweet that Democrats were still trying to claim power through nefarious means so they could reverse Republican policies.“Would End the Filibuster, ‘Life’, 2A, and would Pack and Rotate the Court. Presidency becomes even more important,” he wrote. “We will win!” – Advertisement – With control of the Senate hanging in the balance, Republicans and Democrats began positioning themselves on Friday for a pair of high-stakes January Senate runoffs in Georgia that could serve as a referendum to cement or upend the results of Tuesday’s election, even as one of the races remained uncalled.Senator David Perdue, a Republican, was narrowly leading his Democratic opponent, Jon Ossoff, in the uncalled race. But as protracted counting dragged on, he fell below the 50 percent threshold needed to win outright. He was not expected to clear that bar with many of the remaining votes coming from Democratic counties.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Most of Queen’s Wharf apartments sell out in a buying frenzy

first_imgAn artist’s impression of the Queen’s Wharf development. Artwork/photo supplied.BRISBANE’S development industry is buzzing after most of the apartments in Queensland’s largest construction project were snapped up within a matter of days, despite the project not officially launching until next month, according to industry insiders.The development’s website states Queen’s Wharf Residences are not due for launch until March 5, but sources have told Talk of the Town that at least 500 of the 667 luxury apartments have already sold — mostly to local trophy buyers wanting a piece of what’s set to become Brisbane’s most recognisable landmark.Within minutes of the residential project’s allocation launch last week, hundreds of millions of dollars-worth of apartments were reportedly sold to VIPs and private buyers. The Queen’s Wharf Residences site as viewed from Queensland Police Service headquarters in January 2020. Image: AAP/Claudia Baxter.And there are dozens of expressions of interest waiting to be signed up in case any of the sales fall over.Apartment prices range from $550,000 for a one-bedroom unit to up to about $3 million for a three-bedroom unit with a parking space.YPM Group director and head of residential sales for Queens Wharf Residences Bryce O’Connor declined to comment on prerelease sales in the project, except to say that there had been an “unprecedented level of local interest”. An aerial view of the Queen’s Wharf development under construction in Brisbane’s CBD. Image: AAP/Claudia Baxter.“There has been an enormous amount of interest from the local market and we’re thankful to the Brisbane market for showing the support they have,” Mr O’Connor said.“I think the local market has been waiting for something quite special to come along; high-quality apartments and something exciting in terms of being a destination for the Brisbane public.”The $3.6 billion Queen’s Wharf ‘integrated resort’ is earmarked for completion in late 2022, with promises it will lure an extra 1.4 million tourists to Brisbane each year. An artist’s impression of what the Queen’s Wharf development will look like. Artwork/Photo Supplied.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus10 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market10 hours agoThe core complex, taking up an entire block between William and George streets in the city, includes three hotels, a residential tower and a casino.The project is the work of Destination Brisbane Consortium, a joint venture between Star Entertainment Group, Far East Consortium and Chow Tai Fook Enterprises.When completed Queen’s Wharf will contain 50 bars and restaurants, a 100m-high Sky Deck with panoramic views of Brisbane, which will be open 24 hours, and a pedestrian bridge linking the complex to South Bank. An artist’s impression of the Queen’s Wharf development. Picture: Destination Brisbane Consortium.The reported flurry of sales could be another sign that Brisbane’s once over-supplied apartment market has turned a corner.Since bottoming out in June 2019, CoreLogic indices show the city’s unit market has recovered 2.2 per cent.last_img read more

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Brain of Homo Naledi Estimated

first_imgThe intriguing hominid fossils from a South African cave make news again. This time, the discoverer and a team of anthropologists learn more about the brains of these creatures. Were they people?In 2013, the world was shocked to hear of bones of Homo deep within the Rising Star Cave system in South Africa. Bones were found in a chamber very difficult to reach. Cavers helped to retrieve the fossils for Lee Berger, whose team named the creatures Homo naledi after the name of the Dinaledi Chamber where they were found. Many questions emerged from the discovery: were they human? Did the individuals crawl into this chamber, or were they buried or tossed into it? Did animals drag the carcasses into the cave? Now, additional measurements of the skulls of individuals have been published in PNAS by Ralph Holloway, Lee Berger, John Hawks and other paleoanthropologists. You can get a gist of what they concluded from a long headline at Science Daily: “Where hominid brains are concerned, size doesn’t matter: The human-like features of Homo naledi’s brain surprise research team that examined fossil’s brain imprints.” The PNAS paper begins with a statement of the significance of their latest findings:The new species Homo naledi was discovered in 2013 in a remote cave chamber of the Rising Star cave system, South Africa. This species survived until between 226,000 and 335,000 y ago, placing it in continental Africa at the same time as the early ancestors of modern humans were arising. Yet, H. naledi was strikingly primitive in many aspects of its anatomy, including the small size of its brain. Here, we have provided a description of endocast anatomy of this primitive species. Despite its small brain size, H. naledi shared some aspects of human brain organization, suggesting that innovations in brain structure were ancestral within the genus Homo.This announcement is sure to arouse fervent discussion among evolutionists and creationists (who will dispute the dates and the evolutionary statements). Most importantly, the brain endocast shown in the paper looks very human. Berger and co-authors try to make the case that “The cranial, dental, and postcranial remains of H. naledi exhibit a mosaic of derived, humanlike traits combined with primitive traits shared with Australopithecus and other stem hominins,” and yet they classify it as Homo, “man,” not –pithecus, “ape.” The endocasts produced for this paper, though small, show such remarkable similarity to human brains, and such differences from Australopithecus, that the team was surprised. “The research highlights the humanlike shape of naledi’s tiny brain, surprising scientists who studied the fossils.”In the press release from the University of Witwatersrand, reproduced by Science Daily, John Hawks sees a disconnect between theory and fossil evidence:The small brains of Homo nalediraise new questions about the evolution of human brain size. Big brains were costly to human ancestors, and some species may have paid the costs with richer diets, hunting and gathering, and longer childhoods. But that scenario doesn’t seem to work well for Homo naledi, which had hands well-suited for toolmaking, long legs, humanlike feet, and teeth suggesting a high-quality diet. According to study coauthor John Hawks, “Naledi’s brain seems like one you might predict for Homo habilis, two million years ago. But habilis didn’t have such a tiny brain — naledi did.”Some of the team members are almost ready to conclude that these creatures had human-like behaviors, and even language. “It’s too soon to speculate about language or communication in Homo naledi,” said coauthor Shawn Hurst, “but today human language relies upon this brain region.”Another example of small people with small but modern-shaped brains were the hobbits, Homo floresiensis. Paleoanthropologists were wrong about diet and brain size. Are they now wrong about human variability?A humanlike brain organisation might mean that naledi shared some behaviours with humans despite having a much smaller brain size. Lee Berger, a co-author on the paper, suggests that the recognition of naledi’s small but complex brain will also have a significant impact on the study of African archaeology. “Archaeologists have been too quick to assume that complex stone tool industries were made by modern humans. With naledi being found in southern Africa, at the same time and place that the Middle Stone Age industry emerged, maybe we’ve had the story wrong the whole time.“Another new book by Sanford and Rupe examines all the latest fossil hominids, including Homo naledi.But a different conclusion can be drawn. Instead of imagining that “primitive” ancestors of humans “evolved” toolmaking abilities and complex brains, one could conclude that these were fully human with some differences in size and anatomy. So many speculations about human evolution have been overturned over the decades, one might well call paleoanthropology the Science of Being Perpetually Wrong.In their 2017 book Contested Bones, Sanford and Rupe concluded that the weight of evidence shows Homo naledi to fit within human variability, as does Homo erectus. Their comparisons of hands, feet and other parts of post-cranial (below the head) anatomy show very close resemblance to human bones. The small brain size should not be surprising, as there is a great deal of variability today in those unquestionably human. Consider skull sizes between the smallest midget and the largest giant. Big skulls and brains do not necessarily correlate with intelligence, as early Darwinists thought. It’s quality, not quantity.(Visited 590 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Oscar, winner!

first_img22 September 2004After a good start on the first weekend of the Paralympic Games in Athens, South African athletes have continued raking in the medals, with double amputee Oscar Pistorius putting in two very different but equally sensational performances in the 200 metres. Pistorius, who was born without shin bones, captured the imagination of the Athens crowd in his qualifying heat on Monday when he fell at the start. Instead of throwing in the towel, he scrambled back to his feet and took off in pursuit of his opposition.Incredibly, he not only caught up with the rest of the field, he passed them – his winning time of 23.42 seconds a double amputee world record.Mind-blowing recordOn Tuesday evening Pistorius was in action again, this time in the final, facing a field made up of single amputees. Unhindered by a poor start, he destroyed his opposition, obliterating the world record with a mind-blowing time of 21.97 seconds. The previous mark was 22.71.To put that performance in perspective, (able-bodied athlete) Juliet Campbell captured Olympic gold in the women’s 200 metres in 22.05 seconds, while Leigh Julius, running for South Africa in the 200 metres men’s heats at Athens, clocked 20.80.After the event, Pistorius declared himself “tired” and said all he wished to do was to return to his room and rest up for the 100 metres. He must be a favourite to add a second medal to his collection in that race.Brian Frasure, the American whose world record Pistorius shattered, and the man who built the South African’s racing prosthetics, finished third in the race, and declared the 17-year-old’s performance “absolutely amazing”. He reckons Pistorius’s time of 21.97 will translate to a sub-11 second 100 metres.Third consecutive Paralympic gold for PringleThere was another gold on the track for South Africa when Malcolm Pringle, running in the 800 metres for athletes with cerebral palsy, cracked the world record with a superb run of 1:58.90 seconds.It was Pringle’s third Paralympic 800 metres gold in succession, as well as an emotional victory; Pringle dedicated his win to his best friend, Gert van der Merwe, who died in August 2002 after failing to regain consciousness following surgery on a leg injury. Van der Merwe competed in the Paralympics in Sydney in 2000, winning gold in the shot put for cerebral palsied athletes.Controversial silver for Van DykErnst van Dyk had to settle for silver in the 1 500 metres for wheelchair athletes, but it was a controversial result. Van Dyk controlled the pace from the start of the race but, with 200 metres to go, Mexico’s Saul Mendoza cut across Van Dyk in the sprint for the finish line.The South African athlete’s left wheel was forced off the ground as he took evasive action, which also cost him some momentum. Van Dyk fought back, closing down the gap, but in the end the Mexican finished 0.41 seconds ahead of the star from Paarl.Ampie Louw, manager of the South African team, lodged an appeal on Van Dyk’s behalf, but when it became clear that it would be difficult to prove Mendoza’s infraction, the protest was withdrawn.Van Dyk accepted the result with good grace, declaring himself happy with the silver. He will have plenty of opportunities to better than result, as he takes on an extremely busy schedule that includes the 400 metres, the 800 metres, the 5 000 metres, and the marathon.More track silvers, bronzeNathan Meyer captured silver in the 200 metres for the visually impaired. He finished third in the race, but the USA’s Royal Mitchell was later disqualified and Meyer moved up to second.Hilton Langenhoven added silver in the long jump to South Africa’s collection with a leap of 7.03 metres for visually impaired athletes. He will also compete in the javelin, 100 metres and 200 metres.Bev Mashinini, competing in the women’s javelin for cerebral palsied athletes, threw 21.94 metres with her fifth throw, to capture the bronze medal. Speaking afterwards, she said she knew the throw was a good one because it left her shoulder sore!Teboho Mokgalagadi, whose disability is spastic diplegic, set a world record in the 100 metres heats, clocking 13.07 seconds.Second gold for Du ToitIn the swimming pool, Natalie du Toit landed her second gold medal, winning the 100 metres freestyle in 1:02.83. Her winning time was a Paralympic record, but just outside the world record of 1:02.72 that she set in Barcelona last year.Du Toit just missed out on a medal in the 100 metres breaststroke, finishing fourth and over six seconds behind world record holder Sisse Egeborg of Denmark.The Cape Town swimmer wasn’t disappointed by the result, saying she knew she wouldn’t do well in the breaststroke, but that the event was useful in preparing her for her next challenge, the 200 metres individual medley.Second silver for FieldScott Field followed up on his silver medal in the 100 metres butterfly with another silver in the 400 metres freestyle for the visually impaired. He admitted to some surprise at the result, saying he hadn’t expected to do so well in the race.On a sad note, South African team flag bearer Rosabelle Riese suffered a broken left leg in a freak accident after falling from her wheelchair while boarding the team bus on Monday.Cape Town-based Riese was due to participate in the table tennis doubles competition along with Alet Moll. Moll will still participate in the single’s table tennis event.last_img read more

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Gauteng’s poverty-busting budget of growth

first_imgNomfundo Tshabalala, the head of department in the Gauteng provincial treasury, FNB economic analyst Alex Smith and Finance MEC Mandla Nkomfe all believe that the budget highlights the fundamental economic strategy to facilitate the restructuring of the economy and prepare it for its next phase of development (Image: Melissa Jane Cook)• Lwazi StuurmanCommunications ManagerFirst National Bank (FNB)+27 87 312 [email protected] Jane CookFiscal constraints, a challenging macro-economic environment and the large current account deficit were raised by business and government officials at a breakfast held to unpack the Gauteng provincial budget.The intimate event was hosted by First National Bank (FNB) at the Marion on Nicol on 7 March. Host Jeremy Maggs encouraged robust interaction between the captains of industry, stakeholders and other delegates. Gauteng is the economic powerhouse of the country, adding some weight to its budget, which was met with much approval from those at the breakfast.A focus of the budget was unemployment, and it took a confident stand that there would be six million job opportunities in the free market. The government would also pull its weight and work with small, medium and micro enterprises, rather than leave it all in the hands of the private sector. For example, R180 million was set aside for youth unemployment.Alleviating poverty was at the heart of the document, and Finance MEC Mandla Nkomfe said: “The highest concentration of poverty is in Gauteng, followed by the Western Cape. There is a correlation between urbanisation, migration and urban poverty… At the moment our cost of living is high, food and transport costs are high. But this budget will bolster confidence so that we can have healthy growth in the economy.”South Africa was experiencing fiscal constraints and the global economy itself was slowly recovering from recession. This duo had a negative impact on the economy, and the private sector would play a crucial role in mobilising jobs, he added.Manufacturing, infrastructure, educationAn important issue was infrastructure development, and R10.6 billion was earmarked in the budget for this sector. In addition, R3.4 billion was allocated to health care and education, with the emphasis on more schools, clinics and community health centres.Manufacturing was important in Gauteng, Nkomfe said, and there must be motivation for the province to become a manufacturing hub. “There are issues around reindustrialisation. We need to manufacture here. This will go a long way to entrepreneurial development,” he added.“The South African economy is rising, and we need to find ways to exploit these opportunities. We need to focus more on competition and make ourselves more competitive. We need to deal with industrial issues and labour unrest. There is the possibility of working together – the private sector and the government.”Nkomfe was introduced by Kgosi Ledimo, the chief executive of FNB provincial and local government, public sector. He said Nkomfe was “now in the position of managing one of the largest economies in South Africa”. “He is able to mobilise financial resources and ensure that infrastructure development in the province is taking place,” Ledimo told the assembled business people.To place the budget in context, it was reiterated that 2009 was characterised by challenges stemming from the uncertainty in and the rapid deterioration of the external economic landscape. With the global economic crunch that started in 2008, there was a sharp slowdown in South Africa’s economy, as there was in most countries.But this 2014/2015 provincial budget showed that South Africa had pulled itself out of the doldrums and was on its way to impressive growth and development. Over R86.9 billion had been set aside, which was expected to grow to R98.9 billion by 2016.Funding the budgetNkomfe said it would move Gauteng forward in a very positive way, and create great change. “A lot of money has been spent on roads, schools, hospitals etc, to provide a better life for Gauteng people.”He explained the three sources of the money used in the budget: the government got more than R950 billion from those who paid taxes; conditional grants; and own revenue through gambling tax and car licences and so on. The greater the province, the more money there was to go round. At about 12.7 million people, Gauteng had the largest population in South Africa, and therefore got the most money.Another criterion in deciding how much money was earmarked for provinces was the number of its school-going children. In this category, Gauteng was second to KwaZulu-Natal. In terms of how a province was using primary health care facilities, again Gauteng was second to KwaZulu-Natal. “We need to put more resources into better primary health care,” Nkomfe said.FNB economic analyst Alex Smith said that South Africa’s growth was driven by consumption and the large amount of imports. “There was a huge amount of money [coming] into South Africa during the recession in 2009 as people wanted good returns, but this was a volatile stimulus. It strengthened the rand and supported imports.“However, we consume and import too much. The trade deficit [has widened], especially with Marikana in 2012. We import approximately R200 billion worth more than we export and this is funded by foreign investment.”Current account deficitHe maintained that the country’s economic challenge lay in managing its large current account deficit. “The government has done well on reigning in its spending. The focus must move to investment and production. We need to become more competitive and export more, produce more, and focus on human capital development, the productivity of workers, a healthy worker is a productive worker.”In addition, South Africa needed to sort out labour unrest, Smith said, and focus on efficiency in terms of training and human capital, which must be of the highest standard. Entrepreneurs needed incubators so their businesses had longevity.“We need to support local industries with local procurement. The key message is that the government has done well in allocating funds, but how efficiently is the money being spent? We need to get maximum value for every rand we spend. We need to curb spending on imports and reduce inflation.”Another focus was the leveraging of technology. Innovation must be worked on at a government level, Smith said. Tourism was a massive source of revenue. “Last year, more money was spent on tourism than gold. We can and must do more to boost Gauteng’s reputation.”The breakfast was important as it gave stakeholders an opportunity to interact and put the private sector on display, Nkomfe said. “It is important for the private sector to see what further resources can be released. We need to maximise the over R80 billion that has been set aside. There are many people with projects on the go and there are many opportunities for the private sector to get involved and become a big partner.”DemocracyIt was a great time to celebrate 20 years of democracy, he added. “This time has given the government opportunity to lay strong foundations for the future and move South Africa forward. In order to address issues of unemployment, poverty and inequality we need to deal with the problem of consumption and how our wage bill is ballooning.”Nomfundo Tshabalala, the head of department in the Gauteng provincial treasury, concluded: “We need synergy between partnerships. This can be done with infrastructure development, issues of innovation and ensuring support of entrepreneurs and small, medium and micro enterprises.”The budget had highlighted the fundamental economic strategy to facilitate the restructuring of the economy and prepare it for its next phase of development. “We are all up to the challenge,” Nkomfe concurred.last_img read more

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AgTube: The #Plant16 Song

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 2016 planting season has been Deja Vu all over again for many farmers in the Midwest. The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins wrote this tune to help share their agony with the rest of the country. It this fits what your spring has been like…Crank…It…Up!Lyrics: It’s been 45 day since I started rollin’ Yeah this plating seasons been really tollin’ It was off to a good start thought I’d be spending the month of May in my tractor. I’ve been waking up every morning hoping Dirt would be right l I could get it going But now it’s June and here I sit And I’m feelin’ like such a slacker I’ve been trying not to lose my temper Always like ready set can’t go Older farmers say they always remember Springs like this but I need to see my crops grow Other neighbors say that they’re about done Please just don’t share that stuff with me Farming should be a bit more fun But I’m not even close with #plant16 All I want to do is get these seeds in With some great help in the buddy seat When I’m all done you know you’ll see it I’ll be sure to send it out in a tweet Just about finished my last corn field But I’m not even close to done Them early farms won’t have that much yield Gonna tear ‘em up and give it one more run Mother Nature wasn’t all that helpful Hope I have plenty of corn seed By July I’ll have a beer by the pool Until then wish me luck with #replant16last_img read more

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How To Find A Mentor For Your Startup

first_imgRelated Posts My most important mentor when I first got started in online marketing was John Reese through his blog posts, email newsletter and Traffic Secrets course. I’ve only had the privilege to meet him once, but I felt like I knew him personally because I absorbed all he taught. He complimented me for being one of the very few people who actually implemented what I learned. This led to fast results, and I give him some credit for helping me eventually quit my job and go out on my own.Another mentor has been my business coach, Jeff Miles. Jeff lives in Australia but has flown halfway around the world six times to spend time with me. We get together and talk for hours. He has helped me focus on implementing new business strategies and keeps me accountable in balancing work and family relationships. —Joe Barton, Barton PublishingYe Olde Email Blast Although mentors are traditionally unpaid, one of our most important advisors is our business coach Marla Tabaka. My co-founder and I connected with her through an organization called Count Me In. She specializes in helping women-owned startups grow their companies to the $1 million revenue mark and beyond.When we first started working with Marla, we didn’t know much about running a business. In the past two years, she’s helped up go from a two-person company to a six-person, multi-million dollar international entertainment company. She’s advised us every step of the way — from our legal team to our accountant to our employees. She’s part mentor, part coach and part cheerleader. I think a business coach is one of the most important investments a young entrepreneur can make. —Brittany Hodak, ‘ZinePak In the initial year of our firm, I was mentored by a man named John Beck who had been a partner at a very successful outsourced accounting/CFO firm for several years before starting his own firm. He was extremely valuable for me as a mentor. He gave me advice, answered questions and provided me with input when I faced problems. Because his experience was in my industry and because he had been so successful, he served as a fantastic resource and guide. —David Ehrenberg, Early Growth Financial ServicesThe Not-So-Cold Call Leeward Bean has been a huge help to me and my organization. I know without his advice I would not be where I am today with my business. I saw an article about him and his business in the Tampa Bay Business Journal. After reading the article, I reached out to him through LinkedIn and asked him if I could take him to lunch. We hit it off. His guidance has been irreplaceable. We usually meet at least once a quarter, depending on what I have going on in the business. He is always there to help me and provide guidance. —Alex Chamberlain, EZFingerPrintsLet The Money Talk One of my most important mentors is Alex Welch. He was the CEO and founder of Photobucket, which he sold to News Corporation for around $500 million in 2007. One of my investors introduced us, and ever since, he has made himself very available when needed. He has given great advice that has had a direct impact on how I run my business. At the end of the day, a great mentor is someone who listens to what you’re doing, is able to provide very real advice and has some ideas as to what the step-by-step process should be. Alex is one of those types of mentors (along with a few others I have). —Scott Ferreira, MySocialCloudDo As They Say AI Will Empower Leaders, Not Replace Them When I was first getting into professional speaking, I scoured the Internet for other speakers, trying to see who was the most respected within my niche and held personal values that were close to my own. Josh Shipp was a name that kept coming from my searches and conversations with young speakers.Even though I was still in high school, I reached out to him via a cold email in response to a blog post he had written — trying to provide him with a teen perspective that he could use to help parents. We ended up having a phone call, and I flew up to San Francisco later that year to meet with him and a team of other speakers. For the last few years, Josh has been instrumental in helping me build my youth speaking business while also providing me with insights from his experiences. —Michael Costigan, Youth Leadership SpecialistB2B Ties Tags:#startups Trey Ratcliff is considered to be the king of HDR photography. Not only is he is an amazing photographer, but he’s set up his business so that he can concentrate solely on his art. One Friday morning, I suggested that my Twitter followers #FollowFriday him. He must have seen that I tagged him and noticed one of my YouTube videos that I had previously tweeted out. He watched my video, got to know me as a photographer and commented. We’ve since had a Google Hangout on his popular weekly show, connected over email and have been in great communication. —Angela Pan, Angela B Pan PhotographyInvestor Introduction The Scottish businessman Brian Kennedy has been my biggest mentor outside of Yodle’s leaders and my family. I met him through business, and we quickly built a relationship outside of Yodle. He has provided me with some of the most unique and powerful business and life advice I have ever received. Finding people that possess both wisdom and experience should be the ultimate goal when finding a mentor. —John Berkowitz, YodlePay Them! Most smart founders have more than a few influential mentors helping support them behind the scenes, formally or informally. Many of those people are successful founders themselves, looking to pay it forward with a new generation.Curious about how these relationships form, we asked nine successful founders from the Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) who their most important mentors are today—and perhaps more importantly, how they connected with them in the first place.#FollowFriday For Fame I was broke and had just moved to L.A. from Iowa. It was the first time I had ever lived in a different state. I was playing “The YES Movie” on loop in my bedroom and decided to drop a few emails to people in the DVD. One of them was to Andrea Lake, and she’s the only one who gave me the time of day. I’m light-years ahead of where I would have been if it weren’t for her. —Travis Steffen, WorkoutBOXLinkedIn Luck How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… How to Cultivate the Skill of Being a Creative … scott gerber How to Meet the Demands of the Socially Conscio…last_img read more

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October 15 2014Congratulations to the August 31

first_imgOctober 15, 2014Congratulations to the August 31. 2014 Workshop participants upon their graduation.from left: Marie-Lauren Halleguen from France did the first three weeks of her workshop in June 2012, returned for her fourth week in 2013 and just completed the last week of her workshop. Amanda Clark Alison Gibbs continues as a construction intern.[photo by Melanie Husband]last_img

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