GALA Awards honor Mayor Pete Buttigieg, leaders within LGBTQ community

first_imgMaria Leontaras | The Observer South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg was honored by the Gay and Lesbian Alumni of Notre Dame and St. Mary’s on Saturday, along with Fr. James Martin and Notre Dame law alumnus John Sullivan.Although he sees change occurring in the community, Buttigieg said the University administration could do more to increase acceptance and referenced a lack of inclusivity of sexual and gender identity in the University’s non-discrimination clause. “Certainly when it comes to non-discrimination policies on campus there is some work to be done,” he said. “Some of its more intangible — not as much about policy, but about culture. That’s where I think the involvement and visibility of groups like this — students and alumni making clear who they are and being vocal and building bridges — can really turn the tide.”Ricketts said he believes the University’s lack of a non-discrimination clause hurts both staff and students. He also said the University has not been responsive to bringing a transgender speaker to campus. “We don’t have a non-discrimination clause, which has been an issue since the 1980s when the people who started this group were fighting for it,” Ricketts said. “So there are no legal protections for people who are LGBTQ. I know for a fact there are people who were not able to advance in their careers here as faculty members. It’s not just about the students, it’s about being able to belong at the University regardless of your sexual identity. We definitely have a long way to go for transgender students. As long as I’ve been here, since 2012, we’ve wanted to have a transgender speaker on campus. But it’s been communicated, perhaps not verbally, but it’s been made clear that that’s not welcome — at least not without repercussions.”Ricketts said other policies the University has enacted, such as the six-semester housing policy, have created a barrier for LGBTQ students.“I was a member of Duncan Hall for many years, and I loved both of my rectors,” he said. “They are wonderful people, but I didn’t really have a home in Duncan. I had to find that somewhere else, and I think that’s true for a lot of students that are marginalized … To ask those students to stay an extra year is harmful to the community, and that’s exactly the opposite of what their goal was.” John Sullivan, a 1983 alumnus of Notre Dame law, received the Distinguished Alumni Award for his work in law and advancing the rights of the LGBTQ community, according to the press release.Sullivan works in corporate law and serves on nonprofit boards such as the Human Rights Campaign, which works to promote corporate law equality, and the Matthew Shepard Foundation, which works to address hate crimes through advocacy and legislation. “One of the things with good legislation is that it allows people to have conversations,” Sullivan said. “It’s not going to change everyone’s mind, but it gives you at least a little bit of comfort and safety in that you can have those conversations in an environment that might be a little bit more safe.”Buttigieg, as a resident of Indiana — one of five states without hate crime legislation — said he hopes Indiana will soon pass hate crime legislation, perhaps through a bipartisan effort.“It’s pretty embarrassing for us to be just one of five states in the country that lacks meaningful hate crime legislation,” Buttigieg said. “The encouraging thing is that a lot of people — from Democratic legislators to a Republican governor — recognize that this needs to change. I am disappointed that the legislature has not been able to fix this yet, but I think as we keep organizing we will see improvement there.”Sullivan said resistance from some in the Catholic community may be a result of a lack of understanding and an urge to read the Bible in a certain way that is harmful to the LGBTQ community.“A lot of it is a lack of understanding,” Sullivan said. “Once people get to know [members of the LGBTQ community], they realize how lives are pretty much the same as theirs. For us to be willing to share that, we have to be out and be willing to listen to where their concerns are.”Fr. James Martin is a Jesuit priest, an author and was appointed by Pope Francis to be a consultant to the Vatican’s Secretariat for Communications in 2017. Martin received the Thomas A. Dooley Award for his work in creating a platform of acceptance for LBGTQ members of the Catholic Church, according to the press release. He was unable to attend the ceremony and instead sent in a pre-recorded video message accepting his award. In his acceptance speech, Martin said LGBTQ people are still marginalized in the Church, and one way to mend that relationship is through getting to know each other. “As you know, LGBTQ people are the most marginalized group in the Catholic Church today,” Martin said in his message. “In some ways, they are treated almost like lepers in some dioceses, parishes and schools … In my experience what can help that is simply for people to get to know each other. Nothing is as transformative as encounter.”Ricketts said there is a way to reconcile the Catholic Church’s belief and attending Notre Dame with being LGBTQ. “I came here knowing I was gay because I still felt a sense of community,” Ricketts said. “I felt connected to the Catholic campus and the sense of justice. Tonight’s prayer before we start is one of Fr. Hesburgh’s — ‘For those who are hungry, let them have bread, and for those who have bread let them hunger for justice’ — and I think that sense of purpose on the campus is meaningful. Anyone who feels drawn to that, whether they are LGBT or not, should have a home here.”Ricketts said the ability to have the GALA Leadership Awards is something that would not have always been able to occur, and he is thankful to the people at the University who has supported the LGBTQ movement.“We are very grateful to be able to hold this event on Notre Dame’s campus — that wasn’t always possible — and we are very grateful for the people from both Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s who have helped us pull this off in the past,” he said. “Even though policies aren’t as welcoming as they should be doesn’t mean there aren’t welcoming people here at the University in administrative positions.”Tags: 2020 presidential election, Catholicism, Fr. James Martin, GALA Leadership Awards, GALA-ND/SMC, hate crime legislation, John Sullivan, non-descrimination clause, Pete Buttigeig The Gay and Lesbian Alumni of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s (GALA-ND/SMC) awarded their biannual LGBTQ Leadership Awards Saturday evening to South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Notre Dame law alumnus John Sullivan and Fr. James Martin. Since 1996, GALA — independent from the University and College — has awarded honors to members of the community through a nomination and voting process, Bryan Ricketts, vice chair of membership of GALA, said. Ricketts said Buttigieg — who has been the mayor of South Bend since 2012 and has recently launched a presidential exploratory committee for the 2020 Democratic Party nomination — was chosen before he grew in prominence due to his committee. Buttigieg received the Larry Condren Distinguished Service Award at the ceremony for his leadership and service to the community, according to the press release for the event. “I was on campus when he wrote a letter in the newspaper coming out, and I was on campus in 2012 when we were just fighting to even have a group, so it was good to have someone out and proud in the community, and be able to look to that person as an example that you can come to South Bend, Indiana, and still be out and a public servant,” Ricketts, a 2016 and 2017 alumnus of the University, said. Buttigieg, who attended Harvard as an undergraduate, said the climate for LGBTQ students has improved since he was in college, but there is still work to be done.“I think it’s improved, but I don’t think we are there yet,” he said. “You can tell by talking to young people — especially with the uncertain environment nationally — that a lot of people still feel vulnerable. But I also think organizations and events like where we are tonight, and a general rise in the tide of acceptance has helped us move in the right direction.”Buttigieg, a South Bend native who grew up with parents who were Notre Dame professors, spent time on the University’s campus while growing up and said he can see the campus climate has changed. “It was still edgy to even acknowledge the idea of acceptance for the LGBT community,” Buttigieg said. “Now I think it’s more the University — sometimes a little haltingly — trying to do the right thing. So there’s no question that there has been progress. Even just the breakthrough of even having an organization on campus recognized — better late than never — shows you that there’s a trajectory here. I wish the clock was ticking a little faster than it has been, but I do think you have a lot of people here who want to do the right thing … As long as we can beckon people rather than drag them into the right place, then I think we stand a very good chance of this University community eventually becoming a leader in this respect.”last_img read more

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Trauma Tuesday: What’s a Whipper?

first_imgFalling while climbing isn’t funny. But there’s nothing that gets the adrenaline flowing more than a solid whipper where no one is actually injured. Here’s a few that will make you glad you are solidly planted on terra firma.Whipper Therapy: Katie’s scary Tombstone fall Extreme Climbing Fall Compilation (some explicit language)last_img

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Florida man charged after spitting on police, claiming he has coronavirus

first_imgAn Orlando man who spat on police officers, and claimed he had the novel coronavirus was arrested Monday night.According to an arrest affidavit 25-year-old Christopher Abdad stole beer, drinks, and snacks from a 7-11, and threatened to shoot a store employee who confronted him.Police say as he was getting arrested for theft, he tried to kick the officer who was attempting to handcuff him. Abad then told officers he had coronavirus, and proceeded to cough and spit on other officers, according to the affidavit.Abad was arrested and charged with theft, assault, and battery on a law enforcement officer and assault on a law enforcement officer.Police haven’t confirmed whether Abad was tested for the coronavirus after his arrest. He is being held at the Orange County Jail on $3,600 bond.last_img read more

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2011 Staff Predictions

first_imgabraham hyatt Tags:#predictions#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Editor’s note: Every December the ReadWriteWeb team looks into the murky depths of the coming year and tries to predict the future. How did we do last year? Well, Facebook didn’t go public, Google Wave didn’t make a comeback, and Spotify didn’t make it to the U.S. But our forecasts for Google Chrome, cloud computing, Facebook and something we called the “iTablet” were spot on. What’s in store for 2011? All this week we’ve been posting our predictions. Let us know your prognostications in the comments.Seamus Condron, Community ManagerReadWriteWeb’s 2011 Predictions:2011 Staff Predictions2011 Predictions: Klint Finley2011 Predictions: Curt Hopkins2011 Predictions: Sarah Perez2011 Predictions: Mike Melanson1: Groupon will buy Foursquare, ushering in a new era of location-based commerce.2: Kevin Rose will leave Digg, or sell it for a bargain basement price, then leave.3: As many witnessed (by accident), the Facebook Pages product will be compeltely re-vamped and will allow brands to have a Facebook voice outside of their Page.4: QR codes will finally score big with a mainstream industry: wine.5: Online curation services like Storify will be more widely adopted by mainstream journalists and news organizations, providing a more social, contextual layer to reporting.6: This time next year, we won’t be talking about the glorious resurrection of Delicious.7: Many Facebook users will continue complaining about privacy while never actually having visited their privacy settings.8: A late 2011 RWW post will be titled “Flickr: In Memoriam”9: The most overused word in the tech blogosphere will be: hacktivism.10: Readers’ Choice for Time’s Person of the Year: AnonymousAbraham Hyatt, Production Editor1: A major digital news organization will acquire a once-major legacy news organization. Much handwringing will occur.2: Africa and Asia (which have the largest share of worldwide mobile Web usage) are the mobile industry’s 600 lb. gorilla. It’s clear that those markets will end up playing a significant role in how the world consumes the mobile Web. Watch for more big names investing in developers in Africa. 3: News organizations will try to meet the growing demand for mobile content by spending a lot of money creating mobile apps. The apps will be mirrors of their websites and they’ll be confused – like they were when they did the same thing with print and the Web a decade ago – when no one pays attention to them. 4: As micro-content creation – tweets, status updates, micro-blogging – becomes the norm for online communication, the number of people blogging – or creating any kind of long-form content – will continue to decrease. However, the number of people actually consuming and interacting with that kind of content will remain the same. A win for content creators, but will it increase the monetary value of what they create? Doubt it.5: The availability of big data – massive sources of raw data – will increase. Some fantastic new tools for analyzing and displaying that data will appear. Very few people will use them but the people who do will blow our minds.6: Curation will become an art form. Storify-like apps will proliferate. 7: The number of people who go online every day but visit fewer than 10 different sites a week will increase. Call it the Facebook bubble. As we predicted last year, for many people “Facebook” and “Internet” are becoming synonymous. They’re a small minority, but they’re growing – and they’re not very happy when they have to leave that bubble.Alex Williams, ReadWriteEnterprise and ReadWriteCloud1: Virtualization will turn data centers into extended cloud environments. The term “private cloud” will become meaningless.2: Developing apps from APIs will continue to become easier. The ability to explore an API will become more sophisticated and the automation to create the apps will open development to more people.3: Big data, analytics and data visualization will force major changes in how user interfaces are developed. 4: Mobile virtualization will start to see adoption. The enterprise will see the value in creating distinct environment for apps and data on a mobile device. It will also mean that people will not have to carry two or more mobile devices. 5: The web content management space will extend as marketers move almost entirely online. Analytics, personalization and social technologies will integrate with CMS environments.6: Telephony will continue to become more about messaging. Email, collaboration tools, activity stream technologies and other apps will further integrate with telephony APIs.7: The network will flatten. Networking will move to center stage in importance as virtualization becomes standard practice in data centers and the cloud.Jared Smith, Webmaster 1: A severe privacy breach strikes a location-based service, thrusting the issue of privacy on these networks back into the mainstream.2: Verizon launches a CDMA iPhone 4 in the US; rumors of a LTE version erupt shortly afterward. Verizon’s network sees strain it hasn’t yet seen before.3: Foursquare is going to start getting more into the acquisition game, cementing themselves as a long-term player and looking less and less likely as a takeover target.4: News Corp. will spin off or shutter MySpace this year.5: IE 9’s release will bring with it a renaissance for Web designers: HTML5 and CSS3 will begin to hit mainstream in a very large way starting in 2011.John Paul Titlow, ReadWriteBiz1: Location-based apps like Foursquare will continue to slowly inch toward mainstream adoption. Local businesses will drive monetization and emerging technologies like geofencing will improve the user experience. 2: Tablet user adoption explodes, driven by Apple’s iPad, which will see new competitors pop up left and right. Websites evolve accordingly, using HTML5 over Flash and simplified designs optimized for the tablet browsing experience. Tablet prices will drop down close to $200 by year’s end. 3: The U.S. will finally get either Spotify or a Verizon iPhone. Maybe. Just one of them? Please? Oh, forget it…4: Cablegate will pale in comparison to the secret information about governments and corporations that is released by Wikileaks and similar organizations, which will continue to crop up around the world.5: By the end of the year, mobile payments will begin to approach mainstream status, as people increasingly whip out their phones instead of their wallets to pay for things. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts last_img read more

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Celtics’ Kyrie Irving sprains knee, leaves game vs Clippers

first_imgUS judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss The Celtics led 74-53 at the half.Irving appeared to injure himself with about five minutes left in the second quarter while weaving through traffic on defense.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption charges LATEST STORIES View comments Magic Johnson plans to hug Lakers after NBA trade deadline SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Boston Celtics’ Kyrie Irving (11) drives past Los Angeles Clippers’ Garrett Temple (17) during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Boston, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)BOSTON — Boston Celtics guard Kyrie Irving sprained his right knee in the second quarter Saturday night against the Los Angeles Clippers and was declared out for the rest of the game.Irving had 14 points in 14 minutes before leaving the game.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Lifespan of new solar cell technologies to increase tenfold

Armi Tiihonen defended her doctoral dissertation at Aalto University 6 April 2018 on the ageing of new kinds of perovskite and dye-sensitised solar cells. She has developed ways to increase the lifetime of solar cells and also proposes ways to improve ageing tests for them. Kati Miettunen (l.) and Armi Tiihonen (r.) examine new dye-sensitised solar cells. Credit: Valeriya Azovskaya, Aalto Materials Platform. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by Aalto University Explore further More information: Michael Saliba. Perovskite solar cells must come of age, Science (2018). DOI: 10.1126/science.aar5684 Serious shortcomings in aging tests of new solar cell materials Citation: Lifespan of new solar cell technologies to increase tenfold (2018, April 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-lifespan-solar-cell-technologies-tenfold.html Journal information: Science “Perovskite solar cells have not previously been studied using a fast, low-threshold photography method. With it, we could detect even the slightest disintegration in the perovskite. This could mean that in some instances, our photography method could replace a more thorough and laborious method called X-ray crystallography,” says doctoral student Armi Tiihonen.The photography method can help to determine when X-ray crystallography may be needed. If no changes can be detected in the photography, crystallography can be postponed. Photography also yielded more reliable results than optical measurement devices, for example.The detection is based on changes in colour that aging often induces in the cells. The electrolytes in dye-sensitised cells contain iodine that is bright yellow and gradually turns transparent with age. Likewise, perovskite cells turn from a very dark colour into yellow as the perovskite disintegrates. Once these changes become measurable, the aging process can be analysed quantitatively.The photographic method could be useful in industrial production of both perovskite and dye-sensitised solar cells because it is a fast and cost-effective way to detect changes brought on by aging.Tiihonen’s research includes extensive analysis of ageing tests of perovskite and dye-sensitised solar cells, and serious shortcomings were observed in them. Furthermore, Tiihonen with her colleagues present ways to increase the life-span of the cells by reducing the bleaching in the electrolytes.”Understanding the ageing mechanism is very important. By modifying the cell structure and the electrolyte we have managed to achieve as much as a tenfold increase in the lifetime of solar cells,” emphasises Docent Kati Miettunen.In comparing iodine and cobalt electrolytes, ageing was observed to slow down when the charge carrier was switched. It turned out that iodine electrolytes are not the more resilient one of the two, as had been assumed.”We studied the effects of environmental factors on the bleaching of the electrolytes and the ageing of the cells. Reducing impurities, such as water, and filtering UV light were important, but the benefits gleaned from these proved less significant than we had anticipated,” Tiihonen adds.Dye-sensitized cells have extensive application possibilities, as they can be made out of many different combinations of materials and in many different colours. Perovskite cells, meanwhile, are very much in vogue because of their rapid development: their efficiency has increased nearly tenfold in a decade to about 20 per cent.In addition to their research work, Armi Tiihonen, Kati Miettunen, Janne Halme and professor Peter Lund have actively proposed improvements to the research in their field. Most recently, they have issued a letter to Science magazine stating that with better-quality ageing tests it would be possible to extend the lifetime of perovskite and dye-sensitised solar cells. read more

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