One kindness at a time: Grassroots communities help each other during crisis

first_imgDi depan rumah mama papaku. Semoga bermanfaat 😊🌈 #spreadlove pic.twitter.com/inq7tiKjgu— Adista Indri (@distalbot) April 3, 2020 Sukamti produces around four hazmat suits a day. She is among more than 60 volunteers who have been sewing hazmat suits in their own houses for medical workers across Yogyakarta for the past few weeks as part of a movement called Majelis Mau Jahitin (willing-to-sew initiative).On normal days Sukamti runs a small tailor’s shop at her house. She single-handedly makes uniforms and clothes ordered by her neighbors. But her business came to a standstill when the coronavirus outbreak swept through the country. Her small family now relies only on her husband who takes odd jobs.Sukamti first heard about Majelis Mau Jahitin from her husband. Watching the news about the lack of protective coveralls for medical workers who treat COVID-19 patients, she knew right away she must join the fight.“If I could choose, I would not want to sew these. I am sure if the medical workers could choose, they also would not want to be on the frontline exposing themselves to the contagious disease with a lack of protection,” she told The Jakarta Post. “We are here in this pandemic simply playing our role. It will not end if we do not start to help each other.”Read also: COVID-19: C. Java hospital produces protective gear for medical workers amid shortagesBudhi Hermanto, the initiator of the movement, said the idea came around early March when Yogyakarta reported the first confirmed cases. He saw how medical workers in a hospital in Yogyakarta were left unprotected.“Some doctors told me that they only had a few masks. […] It sounded like a suicide mission. We could not afford to lose them, so we decided to act fast to help protect them,” he said.Working at a health clinic in Yogyakarta himself, Budhi knew nothing about tailoring. He later gathered some of his contacts and they started doing research on how to make protective suits.They made several prototypes and consulted with surgeons before deciding to use waterproof materials such as spunbonded polypropylene.“It really warms my heart to see so many people eager to work together in this situation to protect medical workers. […] Many strangers came to me and asked me how they could play a part in making protective suits for doctors,” Budhi said.By the end of March, the group had made almost 2,000 hazmat suits for health facilities across Yogyakarta. They also sent some to health facilities in remote areas, such as in Pangkalan Bun, Central Kalimantan.They provide tutorials on how to make hazmat suits on their website mamajahit.id to encourage others with sewing machines to start their own initiatives to help medical workers in their neighborhoods.The impact of the pandemic has brought devastation across Indonesia, with 864 deaths recorded officially and more than 11,000 confirmed cases as of Monday.The government estimates that up to 3.78 million Indonesians will fall into poverty and 5.2 million people may lose their jobs during the pandemic.Yet, the unprecedented crisis has also brought out people’s compassion despite their own hardships during the pandemic and grassroots communities across the nation have reached out to others in need.Read also: In Indonesia, rural helps urban to ensure food supply during coronavirus pandemicIn early April, Endang Yuliastuti, 50, a junior high school teacher who rents out small houses in Tangerang, Banten, waived the rents of her tenants until July. The tenants are families of daily paid workers and street vendors whose livelihoods have been badly affected by the pandemic.”They are young families with babies, I imagine it must be a really hard time for them […]. My husband and I agreed to pass up their rent because that is the least that we can do to help,” she said.When she told her tenants, Endang said they could not hide their gratitude and wept with joy. Endang said she hoped other landlords could follow in her footsteps.In Kebon Jeruk, West Jakarta, private employee Adista Indri and her mother have put 15 free packs of food in a box in front of their house at around 11:30 a.m. every day since early April. The sign on the box says: “Anyone who is in need, please take it”.Adista said most of the people who took the meals were app-based ride-hailing service drivers and delivery men who were passing by their house.Adisti shared the details of the meals, which cost Rp 11,000 (73 US cents) each, on Twitter on April 3 and it went viral.“My mother makes sure that the meal has enough protein and that there are always vegetables and fruit included,” she wrote, adding that her father who has retired and her mother who works as a civil servant planned to provide the free lunches until the outbreak ends. A white homemade hazmat suit was folded neatly near Sukamti’s sewing machine in the corner of her living room in Wukirsari village, Sleman, Yogyakarta.The suit Sukamti made that morning before cooking stir-fried bok choy for her family lunch was intended for doctors or nurses treating COVID-19 patients.“After lunch I plan to make another one,” the 34-year-old mother said. “I shared that on Twitter because there are a lot of options to help others during this pandemic. We can start something small in our own localities,” she told the Post.Anna Surti Ariani, a child and family psychologist, said that when people focused on acts of kindness toward others and stopped thinking about the impact of the pandemic on their own lives, they might boost their immune systems.“Helping others makes us feel content and that positive energy can improve our immune systems,” she said.Topics :last_img read more

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After criticism, Pelosi calls for full House vote on impeachment inquiry, transparency

first_imgerick4x4/iStock(WASHINGTON) — The House of Representatives is expected to vote on Thursday on a resolution laying out the next steps in the impeachment process, according to a senior Democratic aide, after weeks of criticism from Republicans and President Donald Trump that the inquiry was unfair, illegitimate and being conducted in secretIn a letter to colleagues, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the resolution “establishes the procedure for hearings that are open to the American people, authorizes the disclosure of deposition transcripts, outlines procedures to transfer evidence to the Judiciary Committee as it considers potential articles of impeachment, and sets forth due process rights for the President and his Counsel.”The vote on this resolution comes as Republicans and the White House have argued against Democrats’ handling of the impeachment process, although it’s unlikely the resolution will go far enough to satisfy Republicans’ demands.The bill will by introduced by House Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern, who tweeted the resolution will “ensure transparency and provide a clear path forward.”Republicans have slammed what they say is a lack of transparency in the impeachment process, as Democrats have called nearly a dozen officials to give depositions behind closed doors. Republicans have called for transcripts of that testimony to be made public, have accused Democrats of cherry-picking information to be released or leaked, and have argued President Trump deserves to have counsel present to cross-examine witnesses.Democrats, led by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, have promised to make their inquiry public once they are finished gathering information in the classified setting.Two weeks ago, Pelosi considered holding a vote to formally declare an impeachment inquiry, but ultimately held off.“The timeline will depend on the truth-line,” Pelosi said.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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10 months agoNewcastle supporters pen open letter to Ashley for transfer funds

first_imgNewcastle supporters pen open letter to Ashley for transfer fundsby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveA group of Newcastle supporters’ organisations have written an open letter to owner Mike Ashley, urging him to invest in players this month.Toon are 15th on the Premier League table, and fans are fearful the club will be relegated should Ashley chose not to allocate money for transfers during the current transfer window.The letter read in part: “Dear Mike Ashley. We are writing to urge you to do what is right for Newcastle United this month and we hope, for a change, you are willing to listen to us and act accordingly.”This is a critical month for the football club, both in terms of your stated desire to sell and the need to strengthen the squad, as repeatedly requested by the manager Rafa Benitez.”We are hoping you see the sense in striving to do both, but if you cannot find a suitable buyer, then it is imperative that you still release the funds needed to improve the squad.”To fail to do so, would seem both reckless and foolish given the damage you know relegation will do. The ongoing takeover cannot be used an excuse not to spend money in the January transfer window.”If you refuse to spend money this month, the risk of relegation not only increases, it will also mean the manager will not sign the new contract you have offered to him.”You have repeatedly said that you want Benitez to stay, so do the things needed to make sure that happens. In short, back him and give him what he needs in this window.”I know we have had a difficult relationship in the past, but at this point, we want to look forward, not backwards. Please do what is right this month.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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a month agoSilva says Everton didn’t deserve defeat to Sheffield Utd

first_imgSilva says Everton didn’t deserve defeat to Sheffield Utdby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveEverton boss Marco Silva says they didn’t deserve defeat to Sheffield United.A Yerry Mina own goal and a late Lys Mousset strike condemned Everton to defeat at Goodison Park.Silva said: “It was a tough game for us. Of course we didn’t deserve the result but when you make mistakes like we did this afternoon you don’t get what you deserve.”For the second goal it should have been easy for our defenders to clear the ball. The second half was bad – not good enough. We need to show more and try new things.”Some individual performances were not at the level we expect, but that’s part of the game. The key moment for me was the mistake we made in the first goal.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Correction Music Festival Deal story

first_imgNEWPORT, R.I. – In a story July 28 about a deal to keep two renowned music festivals in Newport, The Associated Press erroneously reported when the first festival was held. The Newport Jazz Festival began in 1954, and the Newport Folk Festival began in 1959; the two did not begin in 1969. The story also incorrectly reported the number of people who attend the festivals. Each event draws 10,000 people daily, not 10,000 people overall for both festivals.A corrected version of the story is below:Newport jazz, folk festivals secure deal for 25 more yearsRhode Island and the Newport Festivals Foundation have reached a license agreement to keep the jazz and folk festivals in the city for 25 more yearsThe Newport, Rhode Island, jazz and folk festivals are ready for an encore.Gov. Gina Raimondo (ray-MAHN’-doh) and Newport Festivals Foundation chairman George Wein (ween) said Saturday the state and the foundation have reached a license agreement to keep the Newport Jazz Festival and the Newport Folk Festival in the city for 25 more years.The Department of Environmental Management was part of the agreement, which will include a museum with displays dedicated to the iconic music festivals. The foundation on Saturday announced a 40-year lease with the department for a building for that venture.The festivals each draw 10,000 people a day.Raimondo says the plan is to help sustain Rhode Island’s attraction as an “unforgettable, fun-sized destination.”The jazz festival started in 1954, and the folk festival launched five years later.last_img read more

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Financial advisers say withdrawing from an RESP to pay for school needs

first_imgOTTAWA – Investing in a registered education savings plan may have started when your aspiring scholar was still in diapers and university or college seemed a distant future.But when the time comes to start withdrawing money from RESP accounts to pay for tuition, books and other costs of a post-secondary education, financial advisers say you need a plan for that too.Nicole Ewing, a vice-president of tax and estate planning at TD Wealth, says sooner is better than later to meet with your adviser to start developing that plan.“Depending on how the funds have been invested, there might be some time required to convert those investments to cash,” she says.The money in an RESP account is controlled by the person who set up the account, not the student. To start withdrawing the cash, the student needs to provide proof of enrolment in a post-secondary program or institution.By saving for post-secondary education using an RESP account, parents can benefit from matching contribution grants from Ottawa as well as other programs to help low-income families and provincial programs.When the time comes to withdraw the money, payments from an RESP account come in two different ways — the refund of contributions and the educational assistance payments (EAP) which include investment gains as well as other amounts such as the grant money from the federal government, Canada learning bond amounts and money from various provincial programs.Ewing says the decision about which pot of money a withdrawal comes from is made when the cash is taken from the account, but she suggests taking out the investment gains and grant money first.“You want to use up your educational assistance payments first because if there’s any left in the pool and your child is no longer going to school and won’t be going to school those are going to need to be repaid back to the government,” she said.The maximum EAP withdrawal is $5,000 for the first 13 consecutive weeks of full-time studies. Once a student has finished that period, there is no limit. If you need more than $5,000 in the first 13 weeks, additional amounts can be taken as part of the refund of contributions. The government may on a case-by-case basis also approve a higher EAP amount if cost of tuition plus related expenses for a particular program is substantially higher than average.Part-time students are limited to up to $2,500 in EAP withdrawals for a 13-week period.The refund of contributions are not taxed, but the educational assistance payments are taxed as income in the hands of the student.Depending on a student’s income and their tuition and education tax credits, they may not have to pay any tax on the money. However, Ewing says if your student is lucky enough to have well-paying job or other income, you’ll need to watch how much you take from the taxable portion in a given year or you might face a tax bill.D’Arcy McDonald, senior vice-president, retail deposits, day-to-day banking and advisory deposit services at Scotiabank, says it is also important to have the right investment mix when it comes time to start withdrawing the money.McDonald, who has two daughters aged 14 and 12, says as they get closer to starting university he plans to adjust the investment mix in the RESP to reduce the risk, just in case markets make a big move lower.“If you were fully exposed to the market and you saw half of your investments disappear overnight and you didn’t have time to rebuild them in advance of having to withdraw from them, that’s painful,” he said.Once your student starts university he suggests keeping about half the money in an easily accessible form such as a high-interest saving account and the other half in something like a 18-month or two-year GIC which offers a little more interest, but is also secure to be sure it will be there to pay for school a couple of years from now.Ewing says it is important the students understand what they money is intended for so there’s no misunderstanding.“It is to be used for their education, and budgeting is an important side of that,” she said.last_img read more

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HIDCO to run air conditioners using solar power at Nazrul Tirtha

first_imgKolkata: The West Bengal Housing and Infrastructure Development Corporation (Hidco) will soon run air conditioning machines on solar power in a portion of Nazrul Tirtha.Some of the ACs installed in the west wing of the second and third floor of the auditorium will be run using solar energy. The solar installation will be put up by Kawasaki Rikuso Transportation Co (KRT) that has recently been instrumental in setting up a solar-powered temperature-controlled warehouse at Tapasi Malik Krishak Bazaar in Singur. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaOn January 21, state Information Technology and Electronics minister Amit Mitra had inaugurated the facility. “We have already handed over the autoCAD drawings of the floor areas. Information on the existing central AC modules, their times of operation, roof space and balcony space available for installing the solar panels were discussed so create the designs,” a senior official of Hidco said. Keiichi Higuchi, president of Kawasaki Rikuso Transportation Co, and other officials inspected of a portion of Nazrul Tirtha and then recently held a meeting with senior Hidco officials. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highway”Maintenance-free conventional batteries with periodic recycling would be provided. The idea is to move huge AC power requirement in the city space to renewable energy sources so as to move towards a greener earth. A project report would be prepared within a month,” the official said. It may be mentioned that Hidco chairman Debashis Sen had paid a visit to the warehouse in Singur developed by KRT in February and was impressed with its infrastructure. There are two rooms for keeping fruits and vegetables fresh and the temperature inside the two rooms hover around 19 degree Celsius, with wall-mounted digital thermometers registering the temperature. No electric power from the grid is being used. Interestingly, the facilities put up at the warehouse also include a magnetic rat-trap to ensure that rodents do not feast on the fruits and vegetables stored in the warehouse, where they remain fresh for six to seven days. The KRT facility at Singur is funded by Japan International Cooperation Agency. If the proposed solar model at Nazrul Tirtha works well the state Information Technology and Electronics department may use this model to run the air-conditioning system of some community halls and offices maintained by the state government in New Town.last_img read more

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Why UABs Football Team Couldnt Even Last 20 Years

The University of Alabama at Birmingham knew its football team was going to have to battle for survival from the start. In 1996, its first year of Division I-A ball, the team’s slogan was unusually defensive: “We’re here to stay,” the omnipresent banners and billboards around Birmingham read. Less than 20 years later, the team is gone.On Tuesday UAB President Ray Watts announced he was shuttering the football team, citing a study from an outside consulting group that determined the program would need to dramatically increase its operating budget in order to remain competitive. “We have considered many options to fill this financial gap, including through philanthropic support; but our informed analysis of current and past support and interest concluded that the gap is simply too wide,” Watts wrote.UAB faced two major problems, one of which was specific to its circumstances, and one of which is staring down all universities that have recently tried their hand at big-time football.The University of Alabama never wanted UAB to be a competitor, making life difficult for UAB even before a team arrived. Even though the two institutions share a board of trustees and a medical school, Alabama has been leery of UAB’s foray into major sports since Gene Bartow left his job as UCLA’s head coach to found UAB’s basketball team in 1978. Citing a range of grievances over recruiting and fan support, Alabama has refused to engage UAB on the court or on the gridiron. The Tide have faced the Blazers only once, in basketball, when they were pitted against each other in the National Invitation Tournament. UAB didn’t help matters by winning 58-56.In 1989, Bartow, UAB’s athletic director, started to put together a football team. Alabama’s athletic department was not happy. Its head coach, Bill Curry, was particularly adamant: “Not only would we not play them, we don’t understand why they are talking about bringing another football team into the University of Alabama system,” he said at the time. “I’m the only [football] coach in the University of Alabama system. We don’t need another football team at one of our other campuses.” In 1991, Bartow sent a letter to the NCAA accusing former and current Alabama coaches — including Bear Bryant — of recruiting violations.The system’s board of trustees has tended to represent Alabama’s interests over UAB’s, perhaps because the large majority of them are alumni of the Capstone. (Trustee Paul Bryant, Jr., for example, is the son of the legendary coach.) They’ve blocked UAB’s attempts to move out of the cavernous and decaying Legion Field and into a new stadium, and they nixed a deal for UAB to hire Jimbo Fisher, who would go on to win a national championship with Florida State.But even if the Blazers hadn’t been undercut by their own trustees, they still would have had a tremendous hill to climb, one that’s getting steeper every year as the gap between the haves and the have-nots of football continues to grow. UAB was in the vanguard of a recent trend of universities starting football programs from scratch with the plan to get to Division I as soon as possible, and reap the PR and financial benefits that come with a major football program. Nine other universities that are in or are about to join the Football Bowl Subdivision have started football programs since UAB did, and they share several commonalities.All of them are based in the South, and all of them felt they had a chance to succeed because of the prestige of the game and the fertile recruiting grounds in the region. But they’ve found it incredibly expensive to field a competitive FBS program. They all have losing records against fellow FBS schools, and they all receive substantial subsidies in order to keep their athletic departments afloat. They’ve had trouble attracting supporters, perhaps because most football fans in the region are already loyal to other teams. And as the Big 5 power conferences start to crank up the financial pressure — both with lavish spending on facilities and upcoming allowances for players — it’s possible that some of these programs could join UAB on the sidelines.Only one of the new teams looks like it’s making the leap to sustainability. South Florida not only has the highest attendance and lowest subsidy percentage of the bunch, it’s also the only school that’s made it out of the C-USA and Sun Belt Conference dregs and into the relative comfort of the American Athletic Conference. (That said, the team has regressed recently, winning only six games in the last two years.)The rest of the teams look a lot like UAB with slightly better attendance. They bring in far less than the average FBS athletic department, and all their athletic departments receive at least 60 percent of their revenues in subsidies — meaning that a combination of student fees, institutional support and state funding are used to cover the majority of their expenses.In his letter to UAB faculty about the shutdown, Watts specifically cited the huge subsidy as a reason the football team had to go, along with an unwillingness to shell out even more cash for upgraded facilities. If that’s actually the case, and cold numbers rather than system-wide infighting cost UAB its team, then there are plenty of other programs facing similar deficits.Watts claims the UAB athletic budget will stay the same even after the football program folds, meaning that more resources can be put toward other sports, including the basketball team, which has recently fallen on hard times after years of winning seasons. Perhaps UAB can look to the success of Virginia Commonwealth University, its former Sun Belt Conference foe, which eschewed the lure of football to focus on basketball. The Rams now play in the hoops-centered Atlantic-10 and regularly make deep runs in the NCAA tournament.Making the Blazers’ basketball team into a powerhouse won’t be a simple task. But it will certainly be easier than the existential struggle its football team just lost.CORRECTION (9:30 a.m., Dec. 8): An earlier version of this article misstated the year that Gene Barlow started UAB’s football program; it was 1989, not 1991. read more

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Ohio State punter Cameron Johnston on watch list for Ray Guy Award

OSU junior punter Cameron Johnston (95) stands on the sideline during a game against Virginia Tech on Sept. 7 in Blacksburg, Virginia. OSU won, 42-24. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Lantern photographerCameron Johnston, a senior punter on the Ohio State football team, has been named to the preseason watch list for the Ray Guy Award, given annually to the nation’s top punter. Johnston, one of 28 collegiate punters on the watch list that was released Thursday, was a semifinalist for the award during the past two seasons. Since the award’s inception in 2000, the only Buckeye to take home the hardware was B.J. Sander in 2003. Johnston is one of the most decorated punters in program history, with three school records to his name. He set the single-season record in 2015 for most punts inside the 20-yard line, with 31. En route to that total, he set a new career mark, with 83. His average of 57.0 yards per attempt in a 2014 game against Illinois is also a school record. A native of Geelong, Australia, Johnston’s ability to pin opponents deep in their own territory has been invaluable to coach Urban Meyer’s teams over the past two seasons. With the loss of 14 starters total from last year’s roster, having Johnston back to lead the special-teams unit should be an asset.In all, five Buckeyes are on preseason lists, including redshirt senior Pat Elflein, who was named to the Rimington Trophy watch list on Wednesday. The award honors the nation’s top collegiate center. It’s the first time Elflein has been included on the trophy’s watch list, but that’s because this will be his first season as OSU’s center. He has started the past two seasons at guard, where he helped turn the Buckeyes’ front five into one of the most respected units in the country. The 6-foot-3, 300-pound Elflein, who has twice been a first-team all-conference guard, shocked many with his decision to return for a fifth season. But his decision to stick around will likely pay dividends for an OSU offense that lost seven starters from a season ago, including three on the offensive line. Redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett is on the Maxwell Award watch list, handed out to the nation’s top player, regardless of position. Junior linebacker Raekwon McMillan and redshirt junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis are on the Bednarik Award watch list, given annually to the country’s top defender. OSU is set to open the 2016 season on Sept. 3 against Bowling Green. Kickoff is scheduled for noon at Ohio Stadium. read more

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Ohio State Virginia Tech primed for seasonopening rematch

Then-redshirt freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) carries the ball during a game Sept. 6 at Ohio Stadium. OSU lost 35-21. Credit: Lantern File Photo.Last season’s 35-21 Virginia Tech victory over eventual national champion Ohio State stood as 2014’s biggest upset, and now the two squads are set to meet up again exactly a year and a day later.The Buckeyes and Hokies met in Columbus last season for a Week Two matchup. An inexperienced redshirt freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett struggled to the tune of 9-of-29 passing with three interceptions, and he was sacked seven times by a relentless Virginia Tech rush.Although the scene is shifting from Columbus to Blacksburg, Virginia, safety Tyvis Powell said last year’s game is something that will be fresh on the players’ minds Monday night.“It is definitely set up this year for us to have a lot of motivation and a lot of excitement because of what happened to us last year,” the redshirt junior said. “We’ve got a chance to try to get back at them, try to get them to feel the same way, so it’s definitely set up for us to have an advantage on the excitement side.”Virginia Tech’s Lane Stadium, which has a capacity of 66,233, has never hosted a top-ranked team before. Hokies coach Frank Beamer said he has used the magnitude of the game to try to inspire his players, as he knows how devastating the Buckeyes can be.“We have probably the best football team that’s ever played in Lane Stadium coming in here this coming week,” Beamer said during a Wednesday teleconference. “Talented, well-coached, No. 1, ran the table last year, got a lot of guys back, so we understand the challenge, we understand that games like this don’t come very often.“It’s been my experience over the years that playing a team like this helps you as far as the focus for the game. We’ve got smart guys around here, they turn the tape on and they understand that we’ve got to play a great football game to have a chance to win this thing.”OSU senior defensive lineman Tommy Schutt said he expects a nearly unmatched atmosphere at Lane Stadium on Monday, but that is something he and OSU coach Urban Meyer — who has not lost a road game in his three years with the Buckeyes — thrive on.“Personally I love away games,” Schutt said. “I love walking into a place where people don’t necessarily like you and boo you when you walk into the stadium. I think that’s fun, and it really adds adrenaline and excitement for the game, and it definitely puts a chip on your shoulder.”Depth perceptionWhen OSU’s depth chart was released on Tuesday, the word “or” appeared at five different starting spots:Quarterback: Barrett or redshirt junior Cardale JonesWide receiver: Redshirt sophomore James Clark, redshirt freshman Johnny Dixon or redshirt freshman Terry McLaurin (opposite redshirt junior Michael Thomas)H-back: Redshirt senior Braxton Miller or sophomore Curtis SamuelDefensive end: Redshirt freshman Sam Hubbard or sophomore Jalyn Holmes (opposite redshirt sophomore Tyquan Lewis)Kicker: Redshirt senior Jack Willoughby or sophomore Sean NuernbergerDebuts and returnsMonday’s game stands to be the OSU debut of Hubbard, McLaurin, Willoughby and redshirt freshman wide receiver Parris Campbell.Additionally, Miller, who started 36 games at quarterback for the Buckeyes from 2011-2013 and was a two-time Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year, is set to play a prominent role at his new H-back position. The Huber Heights, Ohio, product is also listed with Samuel as the team’s punt returner.Willoughby, a transfer from Duke who is slotted in as the kickoff specialist, could see a role as a long-yardage field-goal kicker, with Nuernberger, who converted just five of 10 field goal attempts from 40 yards or more last year, handling shorter kicks.Meyer said on Monday that Campbell and McLaurin will be on the field with the special teams, as well.Filling inOn July 30, the team announced redshirt senior wide receiver Corey Smith, redshirt sophomore H-back Jalin Marshall, junior H-back Dontre Wilson and junior defensive end Joey Bosa were suspended for the opener at Virginia Tech due to violations of athletic department policies.The biggest loss is Bosa, a unanimous 2014 Associated Press All-American who piled up 13.5 sacks last year. Smith, Marshall and Wilson also take a hit on an already-thin offense that lost two of its top three receivers from a year ago to the NFL and lost another — sophomore Noah Brown — for the season last week with a broken leg.Hubbard and Holmes should split time picking up the slack for Bosa, while Clark, Dixon, McLaurin, Campbell and redshirt senior Jeff Greene will likely get snaps at wide receiver.Greene — who had one catch last season for 13 yards — represents the lone player among those filling in — plus Miller — who has pulled in a single reception for the Scarlet and Gray.Remember them?Virginia Tech then-redshirt junior quarterback Michael Brewer (12) attempts a throw during a game Sept. 6 at Ohio Stadium. Credit: Lantern File Photo.Quarterback Michael Brewer, who completed 23 of 36 passes for 199 yards and a pair of scores against OSU last year, will be back under center for his redshirt senior season. Senior safety Donovan Riley, whose 63-yard pick-six interception of Barrett in the game’s final minute sealed the win for the Hokies, who once again will be lined up in coverage across from the OSU quarterback — whoever that may be.Redshirt seniors Dadi Nicolas and Derek Di Nardo — who each sacked Barrett twice in last year’s game — as well as All-ACC cornerback Kendall Fuller, also will be out there again for the Hokies. Fuller should play a big role on Monday, as Beamer plans to match him up one-on-one with Thomas for the entirety of the contest.What’s next?After the season-opening meeting with Virginia Tech, the Buckeyes are scheduled to host Hawaii five days later in their home opener. Kickoff for the matchup with the Hokies is set for 8 p.m., with the game against Hawaii scheduled for 3:30 p.m. read more

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