Hilfiger offers words of business wisdom

first_img“I was at the right place at the right time, but I had the right product,” he said. “I was studying business myself, trying to figure out what was this role in business that would set us apart from competition. I wanted to understand what it was that would really push the buttons on the consumer and I figured it out.” “I wanted to build a different mousetrap,” Hilfiger said. “I wanted to reach back into my roots when I wore preppy clothes in grammar and early high school and redesign them. So I took every single one of those items out of my closet and redesigned every detail.” Looking back, Hilfiger said his biggest regret was skipping out on college. Hilfiger began selling jeans out of the trunk of his car in a high school parking lot at age 18.  Hilfiger’s parents preferred he go to college and focus on a more practical career than his updated business venture, a newly opened clothing shop called People’s Place, Hilfiger said. “If I were to talk about what I’m proudest about as a businessman, I am proudest of the fact that we are a giving, loving company,” and that will probably go down in history as the company’s greatest contribution, Hilfiger said.  Hilfiger said his subsequent successes after introducing his trademark red, white and blue logo can be attributed to his first private collection in 1985. “They said, ‘You’re crazy. There’s no way you’ll ever be able to do that.’” Hilfiger said. “But I said, ‘This is what I want to do.’ I said, ‘I will do this.’ I took the path of resistance.”A self-taught businessman at the age of 19, Hilfiger wanted to bring big city fashion from New York City to his local community in upstate New York and began designing his own ideas when the trends of the late ‘60s left him and his customers unsatisfied, Hilfiger said.  “We’re becoming much more responsible as human beings and that is very meaningful to me,” Hilfiger said. He may be the king of a global fashion empire, but there is one dream that Tommy Hilfiger never saw through. “I thought I should be a professional football player,” Hilfiger said to an audience of Notre Dame faculty and students as he began a presentation in the Eck Auditorium Wednesday afternoon to share his business experiences and successes. Hilfiger entered the auditorium carrying a Notre Dame football helmet while and told the story of his failed football career, which ended, he said, after an unsuccessful tryout for the high school team in his hometown Elmira, N.Y.   “That was my master’s degree,” he said. Yet while still flourishing overseas, the American base of Hilfiger’s empire appeared to be headed for ruin in the late ‘90s after he seemed to have a monopoly over men’s, women’s and children’s casual fashions for the greater part of the decade, Hilfiger said. He said he blamed his business team’s faux pas of oversupplying the demand — a “business no-no.”  “As a result of that failure, I decided to do something else,” Hilfiger said. “I decided to become a businessman.” “I opened up my store and I said, this is my education,” he said. “But if I had been smart enough to go to business school, I would have avoided some major pitfalls.” Hilfiger said today, he considers hitting bankruptcy at 22 his greatest learning experience. In 1995, he established the Tommy Hilfiger Corporate Foundation to help empower America’s youth and as his fashion trends gain global esteem, his charitable endeavors follow. The Foundation recently announced its $2 million donation to Millennium Promise, a non-profit organization founded in 2005 to combat extreme world poverty.   While Hilfiger’s presentation resonated with business lessons to “be creative … never stop learning, never stop exploring,” in his discussion of the company’s philanthropic successes, a stronger message prevailed. “Boiled down to its simplest form, business is simple arithmetic … really a simple philosophy. It’s about supply and demand,” he said. “That’s something they teach in every business school, but we learned it ourselves and we learned it the hard way.”Today, Hilfiger said his recipe for success remains true to his original philosophy: right quality, right product, right price, right marketing, right technical fit, right people wearing your clothes and right stores selling them. “It’s all about finding a niche,” he said. “Many people ask me why I think we’re so successful and I have one standard answer — It’s always about the people. I have been fanatical about surrounding myself with great people. A great team will bring you great success.” “At the end of the day, they’re just clothes really,” Hilfiger said.last_img read more

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Science Friday to tape at ND

first_imgThe College of Science’s sesquicentennial celebration will continue on Wednesday night with the taping of “Science Friday” in the Leighton Concert Hall of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC) at 7 p.m. to a sold-out crowd. Science Friday, an NPR radio talk show dedicated to science news and entertainment stories, airs every Friday on NPR affiliate stations from 2-4 p.m. EST.Host and producer Ira Flatow will interview three Notre Dame faculty members as part of the show in addition to at least four other non-Notre Dame guests, according to Marissa Gebhard, assistant director of marketing and communications for the College of Science and a 1998 graduate of Saint Mary’s College.The show will be divided into six segments, and the Notre Dame Glee Club will sing “science-themed songs” in between, Gebhard said.Associate professor Philippe Collon, who specializes in experimental nuclear physics, will speak about the applications of his research on the world of art. Through his research, Collon has developed a method of revealing counterfeit artwork without destroying the sample taken as happens with chemical analysis, according to Gebhard.“He uses nuclear physics to pinpoint the age, date, and material of artwork,” Gebhard said. “Collon will be joined by Greg Smith from the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and together they are going to talk about combating counterfeit art.”Collon’s work centers on “radionuclides,” or radioactive isotopes, which are atoms with unstable nuclei. Radiocarbon dating uses relative amounts of certain types of these isotopes to date artwork and determine authenticity.“The field I work in is called Accelerator Mass Spectrometry or AMS for short. It basically is a very sensitive detection technique that combines accelerators and nuclear physics detection techniques to allow the detection of radionuclides at extremely low concentrations (i.e. the ‘needle in the haystack’),” Collon said in an email.“This technique has applications in art and archaeology,” Collon said. “I got particularly interested in this through the development of the ‘Physics Methods in Art and Archaelogy’ course—PHYS 10262—with my colleague Michael Wiescher. We have now been teaching this course for over eight years here at Notre Dame and it is a fantastic way of introducing modern physics through the bias of art and archaeology to numerous students who would not traditionally be taking a modern physics course.”Jeanne Romero-Severson, professor of biology, will kick off the Science Friday taping, Gebhard said.“Jeanne Romero-Severson, who studies plant microbiomes, will be the first segment,” Gebhard said. “She does a lot of work related to the health of oak trees. Her research has implications for outbreaks of foodborne illness linked to contaminated seed sprouts, and she’s working to combat those bacterial infections.”In the program’s third segment, David Lodge, founder and director of the Notre Dame Environmental Change Initiative, will speak about the ecology of the Great Lakes. Lodge is currently on a one-year leave as a Jefferson Science Fellow in the U.S. Department of State.“[Lodge] is a world-renowned expert on invasive species,” Gebhard said. “He is one of the faculty that is in the media the most of all of the Notre Dame faculty. He studies Asian carp and some other invasive species, which is of particular interest to everyone in the Great Lakes area, as we spend millions and millions of dollars trying to clean them up.”Other guests to the show will include representatives from Studebaker to discuss their electric car, forensic science professor Anne Perez from Saint Joseph’s College, who will discuss her work in forensic entomology and interviews with the Kellogg brothers with University of Michigan professor Howard Markel, according to the College of Science press release.Tags: College of Science, DPAC, Physics, plants, Science Fridaylast_img read more

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ND Votes examines political and theological stances on income inequality

first_imgND Votes ’16 hosted a “Pizza, Pop and Politics” discussion on Thursday evening in Geddes Hall to examine what presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has called “the great moral issue of our time … and the great economic issue of our time” — income inequality.The event featured lectures from Christina Wolbrecht, associate professor of political science and director of the Rooney Center for American Democracy, and Margaret Pfeil, associate professor of theology and co-founder of St. Peter Claver Catholic Worker House in South Bend. Pfeil also discussed the impact race has on inequality.“The typical white family earns $50,400, while the typical black family earns $32,028, and the typical latino family earns $36,840,” she said. “Disparities in homeownership fall upon racial and ethnic lines as well — 73 percent of whites own a home, compared to 37 percent of Latinos and 45 percent of blacks.”Pfeil concluded the talk by reiterating the words of Pope Francis on the subject.“When a society … is willing to leave a part of itself on the fringes, no political programs or resources spent on law enforcement or surveillance systems can indefinitely ensure tranquility … because the socioeconomic system is unjust,” Pfeil said.Tags: income inequality, inequality, NDVotes ’16, Pizza Pop and Politics Caitlyn Jordan Margaret Pfeil, who holds a joint appointment in the theology department, spoke at an event about income inequality in terms of Catholic social thought and race.Wolbrecht kicked off the discussion, describing the rise in income inequality in America.“In the post-war period, after World War II … all groups slowly made gains in income. People could expect that over time, their real income would grow,” she said. “That has changed since around 1980. What we have seen is that incomes for people in the middle … have stagnated — same with the poor. But income growth for people above the 95th percentile has increased fairly dramatically.”Wolbrecht then examined specific policies in American politics that she said have contributed to this inequality, focusing especially on issues relating to housing. The application of certain tax breaks that apply only to homeowners has proved to increase inequality, while also being politically popular, she said.“[These policies] are not only not progressive, as in they help out the poorest, but they are regressive. A lot more of the benefits accrue to the wealthy,” Wolbrecht said.Wolbrecht concluded her talk by addressing the possible effects of income inequality on the American political system.“[Income inequality] can undermine the collective, in one sense. Democratic politics is that we’re all in one boat, and that we are working towards not just making ourselves better, but our community better,” she said.Wolbrecht also discussed how inequality could impact popular participation.“The other concern is that [income inequality] breeds apathy, that politics really just serve the 1 percent,” she said.After Wolbrecht, Pfeil spoke on income inequality in terms of Catholic social teaching, and also income inequality as it relates to race.“The ethical issues raised from the perspective of Catholic social teaching are structural in nature,” she said. “These structures, objectively speaking, are morally skewed because they violate the standards of justice, specifically distributive justice, commutative justice and social justice.”Pfeil referenced St. Ambrose, who said, “You are not making a gift of what is yours to the poor person, you are giving back to him what is his.”last_img read more

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IDEA Week promotes entrepreneurship, innovation

first_imgThough the Studebaker plant closed in the early 1960’s, many still identify the city of South Bend with its manufacturing past — and the after-effects of the factory’s demise.Associate provost Bryan Ritchie wants to change this perception.“This community has been mired in its past for so long,” Ritchie said. “I mean, OK we’re the ‘Studebaker City.’ When do we move past that? What’s the new moniker? We’re the ‘Big Data City.’ We’re the ‘Advanced Manufacturing City.’ Whatever that case might be … we just need to get to that next thing. So I want people to start to see that and understand that that’s a possibility.”Ritchie is leading the efforts behind IDEA Week, a Notre Dame-led festival highlighting innovation and entrepreneurship. Ritchie — whose official role is associate provost and vice president of innovation — said the week combines many of the initiatives already taking place in the community.“We were doing a lot of things in April anyways around innovation and entrepreneurship, and so we said, ‘Why not create a celebration week where we pull all of these events into one week? And let’s get everyone motivated and excited about what we’re doing.’ Hopefully, that will have knock-on effects,” Ritchie said. “I mean, it will bring others out of the woodwork, get them engaged, make sure they understand and see what’s happening.”Nick Swisher, executive director of IDEA Week, said the conference is a direct result of Notre Dame’s efforts to become a leading research university.“It’s now maturing to a place that the ideas that are coming from the labs and from the students are enough of a critical mass to really put a focus on entrepreneurship, innovation, patents [and] intellectual property in general,” Swisher said. “This will just be an exclamation point on really what already was happening within the University on the faculty and staff side.”Hosted by Notre Dame’s IDEA Center, the conference will bring together a number of panels, workshops and competitions. The week officially kicked-off Friday and will continue through Sunday, April 27, with speakers such as Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Adam Savage of “Mythbusters” and Daymond John, CEO of FUBU. The festival will also feature performances from comedian Gabriel Iglesias on Monday at the Morris Performing Arts Center in South Bend and The Chainsmokers on Friday in the Purcell Pavillion.In addition to the keynote lectures this week, Swisher said he is looking forward to the McCloskey New Venture Competition, which will take place Friday. The event allows start-ups to pitch their ideas and compete in a “Shark Tank format.”“All together, there are going to be around $400,000 in prizes and in-kind donations given to teams,” Swisher said. “This is major that’s going to count. So this is real stuff. The grand prize winner is $50,000 and there’s other prizes. So there will be a lot of money going out next Friday.”Swisher said he hopes IDEA Week will inspire students and expose them to new career paths.“I have never been in a university where more young people want to make an impact in the world and really be a force for good,” Swisher said. “We’re saying that you can do this through entrepreneurship … and you don’t have to be a greedy capitalist.“There’s another way. And you can choose to do right and still make a lot of money. And that’s what we’re also trying to support and show and lift up as an example to students that this is another path forward.”Ultimately, Ritchie said, IDEA Week is not a one-time event, but rather a long-term initiative.“What we’re really doing is we realize this is a multi-year effort,” he said. “This isn’t a one and done. This is something we’ve got to do this year and next year and the next year and then if we can just get this to a point where people say ‘Wow, that was great. I’d come back again’ that’s a win. That’s a big win. It doesn’t have to be the most amazing thing ever. It just has to be good enough that people say, ‘That was cool, let’s do it again.’”Tags: Adam Savage, Daymond John, IDEA Center, Idea Week, The Chainsmokerslast_img read more

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GALA Awards honor Mayor Pete Buttigieg, leaders within LGBTQ community

first_imgMaria Leontaras | The Observer South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg was honored by the Gay and Lesbian Alumni of Notre Dame and St. Mary’s on Saturday, along with Fr. James Martin and Notre Dame law alumnus John Sullivan.Although he sees change occurring in the community, Buttigieg said the University administration could do more to increase acceptance and referenced a lack of inclusivity of sexual and gender identity in the University’s non-discrimination clause. “Certainly when it comes to non-discrimination policies on campus there is some work to be done,” he said. “Some of its more intangible — not as much about policy, but about culture. That’s where I think the involvement and visibility of groups like this — students and alumni making clear who they are and being vocal and building bridges — can really turn the tide.”Ricketts said he believes the University’s lack of a non-discrimination clause hurts both staff and students. He also said the University has not been responsive to bringing a transgender speaker to campus. “We don’t have a non-discrimination clause, which has been an issue since the 1980s when the people who started this group were fighting for it,” Ricketts said. “So there are no legal protections for people who are LGBTQ. I know for a fact there are people who were not able to advance in their careers here as faculty members. It’s not just about the students, it’s about being able to belong at the University regardless of your sexual identity. We definitely have a long way to go for transgender students. As long as I’ve been here, since 2012, we’ve wanted to have a transgender speaker on campus. But it’s been communicated, perhaps not verbally, but it’s been made clear that that’s not welcome — at least not without repercussions.”Ricketts said other policies the University has enacted, such as the six-semester housing policy, have created a barrier for LGBTQ students.“I was a member of Duncan Hall for many years, and I loved both of my rectors,” he said. “They are wonderful people, but I didn’t really have a home in Duncan. I had to find that somewhere else, and I think that’s true for a lot of students that are marginalized … To ask those students to stay an extra year is harmful to the community, and that’s exactly the opposite of what their goal was.” John Sullivan, a 1983 alumnus of Notre Dame law, received the Distinguished Alumni Award for his work in law and advancing the rights of the LGBTQ community, according to the press release.Sullivan works in corporate law and serves on nonprofit boards such as the Human Rights Campaign, which works to promote corporate law equality, and the Matthew Shepard Foundation, which works to address hate crimes through advocacy and legislation. “One of the things with good legislation is that it allows people to have conversations,” Sullivan said. “It’s not going to change everyone’s mind, but it gives you at least a little bit of comfort and safety in that you can have those conversations in an environment that might be a little bit more safe.”Buttigieg, as a resident of Indiana — one of five states without hate crime legislation — said he hopes Indiana will soon pass hate crime legislation, perhaps through a bipartisan effort.“It’s pretty embarrassing for us to be just one of five states in the country that lacks meaningful hate crime legislation,” Buttigieg said. “The encouraging thing is that a lot of people — from Democratic legislators to a Republican governor — recognize that this needs to change. I am disappointed that the legislature has not been able to fix this yet, but I think as we keep organizing we will see improvement there.”Sullivan said resistance from some in the Catholic community may be a result of a lack of understanding and an urge to read the Bible in a certain way that is harmful to the LGBTQ community.“A lot of it is a lack of understanding,” Sullivan said. “Once people get to know [members of the LGBTQ community], they realize how lives are pretty much the same as theirs. For us to be willing to share that, we have to be out and be willing to listen to where their concerns are.”Fr. James Martin is a Jesuit priest, an author and was appointed by Pope Francis to be a consultant to the Vatican’s Secretariat for Communications in 2017. Martin received the Thomas A. Dooley Award for his work in creating a platform of acceptance for LBGTQ members of the Catholic Church, according to the press release. He was unable to attend the ceremony and instead sent in a pre-recorded video message accepting his award. In his acceptance speech, Martin said LGBTQ people are still marginalized in the Church, and one way to mend that relationship is through getting to know each other. “As you know, LGBTQ people are the most marginalized group in the Catholic Church today,” Martin said in his message. “In some ways, they are treated almost like lepers in some dioceses, parishes and schools … In my experience what can help that is simply for people to get to know each other. Nothing is as transformative as encounter.”Ricketts said there is a way to reconcile the Catholic Church’s belief and attending Notre Dame with being LGBTQ. “I came here knowing I was gay because I still felt a sense of community,” Ricketts said. “I felt connected to the Catholic campus and the sense of justice. Tonight’s prayer before we start is one of Fr. Hesburgh’s — ‘For those who are hungry, let them have bread, and for those who have bread let them hunger for justice’ — and I think that sense of purpose on the campus is meaningful. Anyone who feels drawn to that, whether they are LGBT or not, should have a home here.”Ricketts said the ability to have the GALA Leadership Awards is something that would not have always been able to occur, and he is thankful to the people at the University who has supported the LGBTQ movement.“We are very grateful to be able to hold this event on Notre Dame’s campus — that wasn’t always possible — and we are very grateful for the people from both Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s who have helped us pull this off in the past,” he said. “Even though policies aren’t as welcoming as they should be doesn’t mean there aren’t welcoming people here at the University in administrative positions.”Tags: 2020 presidential election, Catholicism, Fr. James Martin, GALA Leadership Awards, GALA-ND/SMC, hate crime legislation, John Sullivan, non-descrimination clause, Pete Buttigeig The Gay and Lesbian Alumni of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s (GALA-ND/SMC) awarded their biannual LGBTQ Leadership Awards Saturday evening to South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Notre Dame law alumnus John Sullivan and Fr. James Martin. Since 1996, GALA — independent from the University and College — has awarded honors to members of the community through a nomination and voting process, Bryan Ricketts, vice chair of membership of GALA, said. Ricketts said Buttigieg — who has been the mayor of South Bend since 2012 and has recently launched a presidential exploratory committee for the 2020 Democratic Party nomination — was chosen before he grew in prominence due to his committee. Buttigieg received the Larry Condren Distinguished Service Award at the ceremony for his leadership and service to the community, according to the press release for the event. “I was on campus when he wrote a letter in the newspaper coming out, and I was on campus in 2012 when we were just fighting to even have a group, so it was good to have someone out and proud in the community, and be able to look to that person as an example that you can come to South Bend, Indiana, and still be out and a public servant,” Ricketts, a 2016 and 2017 alumnus of the University, said. Buttigieg, who attended Harvard as an undergraduate, said the climate for LGBTQ students has improved since he was in college, but there is still work to be done.“I think it’s improved, but I don’t think we are there yet,” he said. “You can tell by talking to young people — especially with the uncertain environment nationally — that a lot of people still feel vulnerable. But I also think organizations and events like where we are tonight, and a general rise in the tide of acceptance has helped us move in the right direction.”Buttigieg, a South Bend native who grew up with parents who were Notre Dame professors, spent time on the University’s campus while growing up and said he can see the campus climate has changed. “It was still edgy to even acknowledge the idea of acceptance for the LGBT community,” Buttigieg said. “Now I think it’s more the University — sometimes a little haltingly — trying to do the right thing. So there’s no question that there has been progress. Even just the breakthrough of even having an organization on campus recognized — better late than never — shows you that there’s a trajectory here. I wish the clock was ticking a little faster than it has been, but I do think you have a lot of people here who want to do the right thing … As long as we can beckon people rather than drag them into the right place, then I think we stand a very good chance of this University community eventually becoming a leader in this respect.”last_img read more

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Dance Marathon holds hype room as part of annual Riley Week

first_imgSara Schlecht | The Observer As part of Riley Week, Saint Mary’s students gather in the Stapleton Lounge in Le Mans Hall Monday night to brainstorm fundraising ideas for the Dance Marathon.The week also serves as a time for the organization to push fundraising for the hospital.“We want to emphasize our cause’s connection on campus,” said Landis Collins, junior and Dance Marathon vice president.Monday evening’s event, a hype room, consisted of several fundraising challenges for those in attendance. While upbeat music played, participants enjoyed refreshments as they were tasked with requesting donations in various ways, such as asking someone with a February birthday to donate.“It’s a one-hour hype room to get all the committees together and push ourselves to see what we can do,” Carragher said.At the end of the event, senior and Dance Marathon vice president Anna Zappa announced Monday’s fundraising efforts had generated more than $2,300.Sunday’s programming consisted of a dinner for Riley families and a Mass during which the collection was donated to the hospital.One Riley Week event will make particular use of Dance Marathon’s access to the tri-campus community, Collins said.“Thursday night, we have Search for a Star, which will be at Notre Dame,” Collins said. “It’s like a talent show.”The talent show will be open to students performing a variety of acts, including music, comedy and dance, Carragher said.“The winner of the Search for a Star competition on Thursday gets to come perform at the marathon,” Zappa said.Dance Marathon will also have a table set up at Friday’s Student Health Fair in the Angela Athletic Facility, at which there will be a blood drive.“We’re doing blood drive sign ups, and for every single person that donates blood, $1 will be donated to Dance Marathon,” Carragher said.Another order of the popular EMX sweatshirts will also be placed in honor of Riley Week.“Every day this week, we have tabling for EMX sweatshirts and Dance Marathon registration as well as a silent auction in the student center,” Collins said. “You can write down a bid for our different themed baskets.”While this variety of events will continue to occur throughout the week, the mission of the week remains constant — preparation for the actual event, which will take place April 4.“We want to do everything we can to create awareness and educate our community not only on what Dance Marathon is, but what Riley Hospital [for Children] is,” Carragher said. “That’s what Riley Week is.”Tags: Dance Marathon, riley hospital for children, Riley Week, Saint Mary’s College Dance Marathon This week, Saint Mary’s College Dance Marathon (SMCDM) is working to publicize its support of Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis. Riley Week, which began Sunday, features a series of events that engage the College community in supporting the hospital. Monday evening, members of the Saint Mary’s community gathered in Stapleton Lounge in Le Mans Hall for an hour of fundraising together.“Riley Week is a week dedicated to raising money and having all these events to raise that awareness for the children down at Riley,” senior Clare Carragher, president of Dance Marathon, said. “It’s also a way for Dance Marathon to really spark and create this energy that is needed in our last workload before the marathon actually hits.”last_img read more

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Michael Simpson on Fooling the Audience in The City of Conversation

first_imgAge: 33 View Comments “When you talk about Texas, you talk about football and Jesus, but it’s a well-kept secret that people love theater and Shakespeare down there. There were one or two Texans in every class at Juilliard, [including] Michael Urie, Lee Pace and Brian J. Smith.” Hometown: McKinney, TX “I just got my own place in Jersey City, which is somehow closer to Manhattan than Brooklyn was. I’ve had a roommate for three years; he’s a wonderful human being, but I am ready to live alone. I finally get to walk around in my underwear with no shame!” Related Shows “I got forced into theater class in eighth grade and goofed off; I wasn’t a very good student. My teacher said, ‘You need to take this seriously because it might be something you do for the rest of your life.’ At that moment, everything loose in me locked into place. I fell in love with it.” Show Closed This production ended its run on July 26, 2014center_img “The first thing I loved about this play is that it’s filled with people who are smarter than me. ‘Talky’ people can be alienating on TV and film, but when arguments are presented in the theater by really, really smart people, it’s like watching a good football game.” The City of Conversation Stage Cred: After graduating from Juilliard, Simpson dealt with a decade of “personal and family issues” that kept him from properly launching his career. But co-starring with Jan Maxwell at Lincoln Center Theater was a break worth waiting for: “I don’t have the words for how grateful I am.” “The family in this play is very different from mine. I grew up in a red state, but my mother is from Norway, and my parents treated politics and religion the same way, which was: Ask any questions you want, and then decide for yourself.” “One of my favorite compliments ever was when I was leaving the theater and a man said, ‘I feel like an idiot, but I didn’t realize you were playing two different roles.’ As an actor, there’s nothing better than not being recognized on stage.” Current Roles: A doubly impressive New York stage debut in The City of Conversation as Colin Ferris, a young man whose politics don’t jibe with those of his Washington power broker mom, and (after intermission) Colin’s grown son, Ethan.last_img read more

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This Week’s Picks! Phoenix, Rock of Ages and More

first_img Venture Downtown for Fringe NYC Starts August 8, various locations You love theater, right? That’s why you’re here, and not reading “18 Microwave Snacks You Can Cook in a Mug!” And that’s why you’ll love the colossal New York International Fringe Festival (Fringe NYC), which runs through August 24. It features everything from improv to puppetry to performance art. With 5,000 artists and 18 venues, you’re certain to find something really funky and totally wonderful. Your microwave will understand. Click for tickets! See a Homecoming for the Ages August 4 at the Helen Hayes Theatre General Douglas MacArthur and the Philippines. LeBron James and Cleveland. Those reunions mean squat compared Constantine Maroulis’ return to Rock of Ages! The Tony nominee begins a 12-week engagement in the hit ‘80s rock musical, reprising the role of Drew, a shaggy-haired jukebox hero, that he originated five years ago. We’re glad you took your talents back to the Great White Way, Constantine. Welcome home. Click for tickets! View Comments Pay Tribute to Elaine Stritch August 7 at the Metropolitan Room When a Broadway legend departs, solemn obituaries and earnest tributes are not enough. A proper tribute to Elaine Stritch, who died at age 89 on July 17, must include music. The Metropolitan Room has the right idea, inviting Broadway stars (Annaleigh Ashford, Lisa Brescia, and more) to sing Stritch’s signature tunes. Though let’s be honest: Nobody’s gonna sing “Ladies Who Lunch” quite like our favorite salty gal. Click for tickets! Spend the Night in Phoenix August 7 at the Cherry Lane Theatre Bruce (James Wirt) and Sue (Julia Stiles) have a one-night stand. (Cue sitcom audience “ooohh…”) She has a wonderful time, but wants to move on. Bruce sees potential and isn’t ready to let go. Thus begins the parry-and-thrust—pun fully intended—in Scott Organ’s dark comedy that covers 4,000 miles and two very different, very attractive people testing their boundaries. Runs through August 23. Click for tickets! Follow The Wiz Underground August 10 at 54 Below The Wiz! For kids of the ’70s and ’80s, it’s infectious, gold-plated nostalgia. Remember how many times HBO aired the kick-ass movie musical back in the day? We named our cat Nipsey Russell! 54 Below is offering two servings of 54 Sings The Wiz so we can savor those catchy days of yesteryear. Directed by After Midnight alum T. Oliver Reid, this revue features Ken Page, N’Kenge, and Vivian Reed. Click for tickets! It’s hot. It’s so hot, you can barely walk two feet without looking like you went through a car wash. But towel off, guys! There’s tons of cool happenings, including a return of a Rock of Ages favorite, a musical tribute to a Broadway legend and a concert version of a beloved ’70s musical. It’s all part of this week’s picks!last_img read more

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Tickets Now On Sale to See the Rockettes in The Radio City Christmas Spectacular

first_img Related Shows It’s Labor Day weekend so you know what that means…time to start thinking about the most wonderful time of year! Tickets are now available to see the Rockettes celebrate the 87th anniversary of The Radio City Christmas Spectacular. This year Radio City Music Hall will be decked out for the season and the Rockettes will shine in a new finale that transforms the theater into a glistening winter wonderland. The Rockettes modern SNOW choreography combined with crystalline costumes is inspired by the snowflakes swirling over the audience, in a whirling dance of their own. Performances will run from November 7 through December 31. View Comments Christmas Spectacular Starring The Radio City Rockettes Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 5, 2020last_img read more

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It’s Confirmed! James Corden Will Host CBS’ The Late Late Show

first_img James Corden View Comments Corden, who stars as the Baker in the upcoming Into the Woods film adaptation, earned a Tony for his portrayal of Francis Henshall in One Man, Two Guvnors after originating the role in London. He also appeared in The History Boys on Broadway and in the West End. In addition to Into the Woods, Corden’s screen credits include One Chance, in which he played Britain’s Got Talent sensation Paul Potts, Begin Again, The Three Musketeers, Gulliver’s Travels, The Gruffalo, Gavin & Stacey and Horne & Corden. This is somewhat bittersweet news for the Great White Way. Corden had recently been in negotiation to star as Pseudolus in a Broadway revival of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. With Corden now unavailable, a spokesperson for the musical, Chris Boneau said: “Despite the total commitment from Stephen Sondheim, our director, Alex Timbers and our entire creative team…we have decided to postpone the production this season.” The show has thus released the Nederlander theater that was on hold for the tuner.center_img Star Files It’s official! The previously reported speculation is true and James Corden will take over as host of CBS’ The Late Late Show in 2015. According to TVLine.com the Tony winner will succeed Craig Ferguson when he steps down from the gig in December. No word yet on where the show will be made.last_img read more

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