Jim Harbaugh Is Apparently A Big Fan Of Spongebob And The Simpsons

first_imgMichigan Wolverines head football coach Jim Harbaugh watches the action during the second quarter of the game against the Northwestern Wildcats.ANN ARBOR, MI – OCTOBER 10: Michigan Wolverines head football coach Jim Harbaugh watches the action during the second quarter of the game against the Northwestern Wildcats on October 10, 2015 at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The Wolverines defeated the Wildcats 38-0. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images)Despite his busy schedule, Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh manages to find time to watch cartoons.At least, that’s what he said on his radio show tonight. Harbaugh was asked about The Simpsons taking a jab at him in Sunday night’s episode. The long-running show referred to Harbaugh as “a sports genius who everybody hates.”Apparently, Harbaugh is a fan of the show.Jim Harbaugh on his Simpsons appearance: ‘People have been making sport of me my whole life … but that’s one of my favorite shows.’— Nick Baumgardner (@nickbaumgardner) November 8, 2016But wait, it gets better. Harbaugh is also a big fan of Spongebob Squarepants, and you won’t believe his reason why.Harbaugh favors Homer. Also a Spongebob fan – says Spongebob “attacks each day with an enthusiasm unknown to mankind.”— Rachel Lenzi (@RLenziCMG) November 8, 2016Harbaugh is truly one of a kind.last_img read more

Nebraska’s Biggest Rival According To One Columnist Is Pretty Surprising

first_imgNebraska's mascot takes picture with a fan.LINCOLN, NE – SEPTEMBER 02: The mascot of the Nebraska Cornhuskers greets fans before the arrival of the team in the game against the Arkansas State Red Wolves at Memorial Stadium on September 2, 2017 in Lincoln, Nebraska. (Photo by Steven Branscombe/Getty Images)Conference realignment has cost us a few big rivalries, like Texas-Texas A&M, Pitt-West Virginia, and Kansas-Missouri. Nebraska’s move to the Big Ten cost us a few as well.While members of the Big 12, Nebraska shared pretty heated rivalries with clubs like Oklahoma and Colorado. The Buffs and Huskers met this year, but for the most part, they’ve been replaced by Big Ten West foes like Wisconsin and Iowa.Nebraska’s profile in basketball has been raised under head coach Tim Miles in recent years, and one prominent voice in the area thinks the biggest rivalry for the athletic department may come on the hardwood, and not the gridiron.In a recent column for the Lincoln Journal-Star, Steven M. Sipple  says he thinks Nebraska’s basketball rivalry with nearby Creighton is the most heated that the Huskers have.He thinks it is pretty definitive as well, which is interesting.My partner in crime on “Early Break” (93.7 FM), Jake Sorensen, raised an interesting question Tuesday morning: Did you ever think you’d see a day at Nebraska where it’s basketball that has the most heated rivalry of any of the school’s sports?No question, Creighton-Nebraska on the hardwood has gotten hot and even a bit nasty. No other rivalry in the Husker realm elicits as much energy, much of it visceral in nature. Tell me you’re not already looking forward to next season’s game.One of the casualties of Nebraska’s move to the Big Ten was football rivalries dating to the Big Six days going by the wayside. Give it time, though.The Huskers are coming off of a big 94-75 win over the rival Bluejays to go to 8-2 on the season.In time, the Nebraska-Iowa or Nebraska-Wisconsin games will probably overtake any basketball series, especially if the Huskers start competing for Big Ten West titles under Scott Frost. It isn’t the worst thing for the athletic department as a whole for some other programs to start to draw similar interesting, though. Big rivalries are a part of that.[Lincoln Journal-Star]last_img read more

Outstanding Educators to be Honoured June 21

first_img The Prime Minister’s Medal of Appreciation (PMMA) for Service to Education ceremony will be held on Wednesday, June 21, on the Lawns of Jamaica House. Story Highlights To be considered for the award, recipients must have shown evidence of community involvement, including participation in civic and club activities.center_img The Prime Minister’s Medal of Appreciation (PMMA) for Service to Education ceremony will be held on Wednesday, June 21, on the Lawns of Jamaica House.Forty outstanding educators who have contributed 1,428 years of service collectively to education will receive the PMMA.The recipients were nominated by their peers, community members and elected representatives.The recipients include Arnoldo Allen, New Forest Infant, Primary and Junior High; Dr. O’neil Ankle, Jonathan Grant High; Paul Bailey, Holmwood Technical; Sonia Brown, Easington Primary; Lena Buckle-Scott, Ministry of Education; Mavis Burke, Programme for the Advancement of Childhood Education, Canada; Yvonne Clarke, Bethlehem Moravian College; Elaine Clarke, Anchovy Primary; Dianne Clarke, Victory Academy; Clayton Collins, Troy Primary; Bethel Davis, Cockburn Gardens Primary and Junior High; Lloyd Fearon, Dinthill Technical High; Daisy Garwood, Schoolfield All-Age; and Charmaine Gooden Monteith, Jamaica Teachers’ Assocation. Also to be honoured are Kevin Grant, Holmwood Technical; Robert Green, Ebony Park Academy; Colin Gyles, University of Technology (UTech); Beverly Harris, Bridgeport High; Maxine Headlam, Ministry of Education; Colin Hitchman, HEART Trust/NTA; Dotlene Irving, Paul Bogle High; Marjorie James, Shortwood Teachers’ College; Winston Jennings, Roehampton Primary; Zellynne Jennings-Craig, University of the West Indies (UWI); Joyce Kellyman-Wright, John’s Town Primary; Paulette Kennedy, Maldon Primary; Marcia Lobban-Mitchell, Bridgeport High; and Lesline McCatty, Belair High.Included also are Joy McGlashan, Moneague College; Beverly McKenzie, Glenmuir High; Norma McNeill, Pembroke Hall Primary; Edwin Murray, G.C. Foster College: Pauleen Reid, Holland High; Wayne Robinson, Jamaica College; Veronica Sewell-Morgan, Charles Chin-Loy Early Childhood Development Centre; Garth Smith, Nazareth All-Age; Dorothy Taylor, Maverley Primary; Miriam Taylor, Excelsior Community College; Catherine Thorpe, Gordon Pen Basic and Judith Wallace, Farm Primary and Junior High.To be considered for the award, recipients must have shown evidence of community involvement, including participation in civic and club activities.Educators involved with uniformed groups and programmes that foster the development of the community and creativity in the service rendered, may also be considered for the award.The awards will be presented to persons who are citizens of Jamaica, but in exceptional circumstances, a person who is not a citizen may be recommended for the award.Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, will give the main address. Among the other dignitaries who will attend are Their Excellences, Governor-General the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen and Lady Allen; Leader of the Opposition, Dr. Peter Phillips; and Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid.The ceremony is scheduled to start at 6:30 p.m., and guests are to be seated by 5:30 p.m.last_img read more

Free WiFi AAP welcomes move Oppn says poll ploy

first_imgNEW DELHI: The AAP has welcomed the move of installation of free WiFi hotspots in the city as part of the election manifesto promised by the party. “Governance superman Arvind Kejriwal delivers on yet another promise. Setting the bar high for quality governance and fulfilment of all election promises. Free WiFi will bridge the digital divide and bestow the power of learning, information, knowledge and outreach upon the poorest,” tweeted AAP leader Raghav Chadha. However, the opposition termed the announcements as a poll gimmick. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder”With the fulfilment of the Free WiFi for all promise, Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal has now fulfilled every single promise made to the people of Delhi in the run up to the 2015 election. The party had released a 70-point action plan before the election, which had said that free WiFi is a right of the people as it is a basic infrastructure that any modern city should have. It is a big step to empower the youth of the city,” said senior AAP leader Atishi. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsReferring to the promises made by the party before the election, Atishi listed the key campaign promises already fulfilled. “From the 70-point action plan, Arvind Kejriwal has delivered electricity at half prices, free lifeline water, augmenting water resources through rain water harvesting, provision of high quality education, expansion of the healthcare infrastructure, installation of CCTVs in public spaces, reduction of VAT rates and ending inspector raj, opening of incubation centres in Delhi educational institutions. Now we have fulfilled the 70th point that is free WiFi for all.” Meanwhile, Leader of Opposition and BJP leader Vijender Gupta said, “As the elections to the Delhi Assembly are approaching, CM Kejriwal is creating a dream world of promises which he could not fulfil during the last four-and-a-half years is nothing but public cheating. One such promise he announced today is the decision of the Cabinet to begin skeleton free Wi-Fi internet services later this year i.e. around the election time. The deadline for commissioning of Wi-Fi hotspots across the city is now September 2020 whereas tenure of the Government ends in mid-February, 2020.”last_img read more

HOW STRATFORD FESTIVAL IS ADAPTING TO A POSTMETOO WORLD

first_imgMrs. Page (Brigit Wilson) and Mrs. Ford (Sophia Walker) share a laugh in Stratford Festival’s production of The Merry Wives of Windsor. Director, Antoni Cimolino says the play is a good example of how Shakespeare empowered women: ‘in a very healthy and smart way [the women] straighten out the offender and at the same time cure a husband of his jealousy.’ (Chris Young/Stratford Festival) Login/Register With: But Cimolino says, he didn’t really anticipate it. It just happened.“There was something happening in society throughout 2017 [when the season was planned] that culminated in the #MeToo movement. So, yes. Unconsciously it was part of the formation of the season for 2018. Consciously it was part of the season formation for 2019.” Twitter When the peak of the #MeToo movement hit in early 2018, many theatre companies in Canada were shaken by the allegations made against Soul Pepper Theatre in Toronto and its then-executive director Albert Schultz.For its part, Stratford Festival says it has never faced allegations of harassment or sexual assault from actors or staff but artistic director Antoni Cimolino was repeatedly asked by audience members how he managed to “anticipate the movement” and reflect it in the season’s offering.That summer, the festival put women in the spotlight casting Martha Henry as Prospero in The Tempest and changing nearly half the roles in Julius Caesar to women. Advertisementcenter_img Advertisement Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

Sudan UN agency seeks access to deliver food to Southern Kordofan and

23 September 2011The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) said today it is appealing to the Sudanese Government for access to Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile states so that it can provide assistance to thousands of people affected by fighting. Clashes between the Sudanese armed forces and rebels over the past few months in both states displaced tens of thousands of people. Earlier this month, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) had reported that relief agencies were unable to reach those in need due to movement restrictions imposed by the Government. WFP’s spokesperson in Geneva, Christiane Berthiaume, said the agency wanted to gain access to Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile so that it can distribute food aid and control food distributions amid growing concern about the plight of the displaced.The agency has managed to deliver some food assistance, “but thousands of people were yet to be reached and food stocks needed replenishment,” she told a news conference.The WFP warehouses in Blue Nile State were empty and at least 100,000 people needed food assistance, the last food distribution having been in June, Ms. Berthiaume noted.Several thousand people affected by the fighting have also fled to Ethiopia and other places. WFP is distributing five-day food rations at reception centres to enable people to reach the Sherkole camp in Ethiopia, where they received enough food for 15 days. It has so far dispatched 7,000 tons of food to Sherkole camp, enough to feed 20,000 people for one month. Ms. Berthiaume said that WFP has been providing food assistance to 135,000 conflict victims in Southern Kordofan. However, more than 200,000 people are estimated to need assistance. read more

World Water Week UN deputy chief urges greater international cooperation on sanitation

In a keynote address to the World Water Week plenary session in Stockholm, Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson said:“Dealing effectively with the water and sanitation crisis is fundamental to fighting disease and poverty.”“In a world of population growth and pressures on water resources within and among nations, sound and fair water management is a huge task and a clear imperative for all of us,” Mr. Eliasson added. He urged the hundreds of delegates gathered for the session entitled “Building partnerships for Sanitation and Water for All” to work towards sustainable solutions and measures among actors, including national governments, local administrations, development partners, international organizations, the private sector, the research and science community and civil society. Water and sanitation are included in the eight anti-poverty targets known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which world leaders agreed to meet by the end of 2015.The deputy noted last year’s announcement that the world had reached the target for access to improved sources of water, but water quality to a large degree still fails to meet basic UN World Health Organization (WHO) standards. Roughly 80 per cent of global wastewater from human settlements or industrial sources is discharged untreated, contaminating oceans, lakes and rivers.Inadequate water supply and sanitation around the world lead to an economic loss of $260 billion in health costs and diminished work productivity, WHO reported. Meanwhile, meeting the MDG target on water and sanitation amount to $60 billion annually, according to studies Mr. Eliasson cited.Sanitation is the most lagging of the MDGs. Meeting the target would involve reducing the proportion of people without access to sanitation from more than half to 25 per cent by 2015.“We must continue to break taboos. As was the case for the word ‘toilets’ a few years ago, it is time to incorporate ‘open defecation’ in the diplomatic discourse today,” Mr. Eliasson urged. Currently, one out of every four people in the least developed countries defecates in the open. Ending the practice could, for instance, lead to a 36 per cent reduction in diarrhoea, the deputy UN chief noted, and enhance the personal safety of women and girls who risk sexual assaults when venturing from their homes to isolated places for basic needs.Open defecation is part of the “Call to Action” that Mr. Eliasson launched in March on behalf of Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. It aims to improve hygiene, change social norms, better managing human waste and waste-water, and completely eliminate the practice of open defecation by 2025. The General Assembly furthered that aim last month, declaring 19 November as World Toilet Day. Noting examples of international cooperation on these issues, Mr. Eliasson noted the Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) initiative comprised of governments, donors, civil society organizations, development partners and several UN agencies. In its latest report, the SWA partnership said that political leadership and concrete action have led to good progress on creating universal and sustainable access to decent sanitation and drinking water, but additional efforts are needed. High-level members of the group are due to meet again next April, in a meeting led by the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Bank. Turning to his experiences in Darfur, Sudan, where Mr. Eliasson had been a Special Envoy of the Secretary-General, the UN deputy chief cautioned that water scarcity is an increasing reason for conflict.“I have seen it in Darfur where poisoning of water wells was a way for forcing people to leave their villages for the overcrowded camps,” he noted, as well as in strained relations between States related to cross-border river and waterways management, agriculture and energy.“If competition for resources turns into open conflict, invariably all sides, all involved, will suffer,” Mr. Eliasson said. “Our aim must be to make scarce resources, in particular water, a reason for cooperation rather than conflict.” read more

UN health agency approves rapid test for Ebola as decline in cases

Meanwhile at UN headquarters, Dr. Bruce Aylward, who leads WHO’s response on Ebola, and Dr. David Nabarro, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy on Ebola, briefed Member States on the need to maintain the robust response to get the number of cases to zero.“As long as there is even one case of Ebola active in the human population, it’s a danger for everybody – it’s a problem for West Africa, it’s a problem for [wider] Africa and it’s a problem for the world, Dr. Nabarro told reporters after their briefing. “We must be fully engaged, all of us, until the last person with Ebola is treated and is cured.”The two doctors expressed their concerns about the recent slowdown in the pattern of decline in cases over the last four weeks in the three most affected countries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.Referring to a graph showing that the last four weeks has seen more than 120 Ebola cases a week, Dr. Aylward said “this is not what you want to see,” and described the trend as “a very bumpy road” on the wary to zero cases. They also told reporters that the upcoming rainy season starting in about two months posed as a complicating factor as it could give the virus a chance to get ahead of the response.Earlier in Geneva, the UN health agency announced that it had “assessed and today listed the ReEBOV Antigen Rapid Test Kit [manufactured by Corgenix Medical Corp of the United States] as eligible for procurement to Ebola affected countries.”“The test was evaluated under WHO’s Emergency Assessment and Use, a procedure established to provide minimum quality, safety and performance assurance for diagnostic products in the context of the Ebola emergency, the announcement said.The new test, which can provide results within 15 minutes, “is able to correctly identify about 92 per cent of Ebola infected patients and 85 per cent of those not infected with the virus,” according to WHO.In comparison, the turn-around time of current tests for Ebola can vary between 12 and 24 hours, it said.WHO Spokesman Tarik Jašareviæ told reporters in Geneva that the new test was a little bit less accurate than the test that WHO was currently using, but it was easy to perform, it did not require electricity and it could be used in lower level health care facilities or in mobile units for patients in remote settings.The WHO spokesman also said that a number of agencies, such as the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), have expressed interest in purchasing it.The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa has affected more than 23,000 people with over 9,400 deaths, mostly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. read more

UN agency supports Government project bringing rights services to South Sudanese people

The programme began on 1 February after an agreement was concluded in December between the UN refugee agency (UNHCR), Sudan’s Commissioner for Refugees and the Directorate General of Passports and Immigration. So far, 54,000 out of an estimated half a million South Sudanese living in Sudan have been registered, and 37,000 identity cards distributed.UNHCR is supporting implementation of the plan financially and with technical capacity, ensuring that South Sudanese people staying in Sudan, who are older than five years of age, are given identity cards for the duration of their stay, allowing them the same rights and access to services as Sudanese citizens, which allows them to work, buy property, move around freely and live anywhere in the country.Registration centres have been established in 12 sites in Khartoum state, and in March the project will be expanded to locations across the country, with White Nile state, where an estimated 66,000 South Sudanese refugees live, next on the list. Providing a legal proof of identity and the unrestricted right to stay in the country for as long as the conflict continues represent major protection safeguards against forced return.The majority of South Sudanese living in Sudan have been present since secession in 2011, with their numbers swollen towards the 500,000 mark by 120,000 people who fled across the border since December 2013 when South Sudan’s conflict erupted.In response to violence that has displaced a total of 2 million people during the last 14 months, the Sudanese Government said South Sudanese people would be treated as Sudanese citizens and has maintained an open door policy since then.Working with partners, UNHCR has assisted over 84,000 South Sudanese arriving in Sudan. Basic services and items have been provided to refugees in White Nile state, South and West Kordofan, and in Khartoum, where over 3,000 families have been assisted.A key focus of assistance is on identifying vulnerable people and providing them with assistance such as family tracing and reunification for unaccompanied and separated children, livelihoods initiatives for women at risk, and material assistance to elderly and disabled South Sudanese. read more

Brock triathlon in honour of athlete who lost battle with cancer

“When I was first diagnosed with cancer, I felt alone. I never imagined how many people I would inspire with my story.” –Naomi Cermak (1982-2013)In 2013 at the age of 31, Naomi Cermak (MSc ’06) lost her battle with metastatic melanoma cancer. She continues to inspire others to fight and find a cure.This summer, Brock University’s Faculty of Applied Health Sciences and the Department of Athletics and Recreation are looking for triathlon participants to support a graduate student scholarship in memory of Naomi Cermak. The triathlon will take place on Thursday, July 21 at Brock.“The development of this scholarship will help us remember Naomi, as both a researcher and an athlete,” says Tineke Cermak. “My daughter was an amazing young woman who was still writing papers and mentoring students while undergoing treatment.”At the time of her diagnosis, Cermak was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Maastricht in Holland and her papers on beet root juice and performance are still cited by researchers.“We want to honour Naomi’s memory through the development of a graduate student scholarship and raise awareness of melanoma cancers and the importance of skin protection, particularly among athletes,” says Department of Kinesiology Chair Brian Roy.For a number of years, the Brock community has embraced the sport of triathlon, with several small indoor and outdoor events each year.“This summer, one of our annual try-a-tri events is aiming to become a little more meaningful,” says Athletics and Recreation Fitness Manager Eric Walter.The Naomi Cermak Tri to Inspire Memorial Event will remember and celebrate her life in a meaningful way, says Walter.Cermak is remembered by those who knew her as a friendly, optimistic individual who always looked on the bright side and inspired thousands with her drive to train for a 226-kilometre triathlon while undergoing painful treatment for cancer.Suffering from metastatic melanoma, Cermak managed to strength train from her hospital bed and rode a stationary bike when the pain was bearable. In between doctors’ visits, she participated in yoga and swam.“As part of her swim training, she headed north to Georgian Bay where she wore a special wet suit to shield her skin from the sun, which needed extra protection as a result of the side effects from the cancer medications,” explains Roy.Despite her efforts, Cermak withdrew from the triathlon because her immune system was compromised and her health was deteriorating. Cermak lost her battle with cancer and died on Dec. 14, 2013.You can show your support and participate in the Naomi Cermak Tri to Inspire as an individual or as a team.The memorial event will begin at noon in the Eleanor Misener Aquatic Centre with a 150m or 400m swim followed by a 10km bike ride and 2km run. Following the event, participants are invited to join the Farmer’s Market in Jubilee Court.The first 50 people to register for the event will receive a Badger Balm sun care product courtesy of the W.S. Badger Company, Inc.Representatives from the Canadian Cancer Society of Niagara will be at the Farmer’s Market during the month of July to provide information about melanoma and metastatic cancers and the importance of sun protection.To register, contact the Athletics and Recreation Welcome Desk at 905-688-5550 x4060 or www.brocku.ca/recreation-servicesDate: Thursday, July 21, 2016Triathlon starts: noonCost: $20.00 (includes complimentary lunch)Visit brocku.ca/donate and select Naomi Cermak Graduate Student Scholarship on the gift designation drop down menu to make a contribution. read more

Wrestling Snyder wins BoJo 2nd Ohio State finishes 2nd well behind Penn

OSU wrestling coach Tom Ryan watches on during a match against Minnesota on Feb. 6, 2015. Credit: Lantern file photoST. LOUIS — Ohio State wrestling placed second at the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships in St. Louis with 110 points, trailing only Penn State at 146.5.With five All-Americans, the Buckeyes had a strong performance and are already looking to build for next year. Every starter will be returning for the Buckeyes in 2018.“Senior year, the nationals are going to be in Cleveland,” junior Kyle Snyder said after winning the 285-pound NCAA Championship. “So no better place to bring one to Ohio State. Our lineup is going to be really good next year.”With Snyder returning, the Buckeyes will enter 2018 with six wrestlers likely to be ranked in the top five of their weight class.The team clinched second place by the end of competition in the consolation bracket, before championship matches had begun.While Penn State led the field by a wide margin early and never looked as if they would surrender the lead, OSU had to fend off the likes of Iowa and Oklahoma State to ensure its silver finish. Oklahoma State finished third with 103 points and Iowa finished fourth with 97.The team featured one individual champion, a runner-up, two third place finishers, and a wrestler in both fourth and fifth place.Snyder captured his second national title over Wisconsin’s Connor Medbery at heavyweight, and redshirt junior Bo Jordan finished as a runner-up to Penn State’s Mark Hall.Redshirt junior 133-pounder Nathan Tomasello and redshirt freshman 197-pounder Kollin Moore each finished third in their respective weight classes, while 149-pounder Micah Jordan finished fourth and 184-pounder Myles Martin finished fifth.With that, the team features five All-Americans, each of which will be returning for the 2018 season. read more

Smartsense reduces reentry times after blasts

first_imgCommunication is crucial in the underground mining industry to provide a safe, productive and profitable operation. The smartcom® Leaky Feeder System gained Becker Varis an international reputation. Becker Varis is also a leader in underground blasting systems as a result of the smartblast® product line. Smartblast is a safe, reliable and cost-effective blasting system which uses the Leaky Feeder as the communications backbone.  There are over 500 smartcom systems around the world.  Becker Varis’s most recent introduction is the new smartsense® gas monitor.The smartsense fixed monitor SSFM-100 is a configurable multi-gas, four channel high accuracy gas monitor with full range temperature compensation. The smartsense product line has been designed to strict international standard and manufactured to local and international regulations to insure a high-quality and reliable product for the harshest of environments. Its all-in-one package eliminates the need for complex cable connections and troublesome programming. Becker Varis says “out of the box the SSFM-100 is the most versatile and hassle free Atmospheric and Environmental System on the market with multiple international certification approvals.”With its unique 360° Alarm® function the SSFM-100 is capable of monitoring any combination of gases.  It allows for customer expansion with a wide range of external inputs. With its integrated controller, smartsense functions as a black box storing critical information such as calibration records, alarm history and data logging for post-accident investigation.  Three fully programmable alarm set points for Alarm and Output controls along with Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL) and Time Weighted Average (TWA) limits displayed on the extra larger LCD display makes it possible to view the reading from up to 5 m away.  An auto-adjustable backlight and a wide range of mounting and connectivity accessories make it suitable for both underground and surface applications.The maintenance of the SSFM-100 system is minimal outside the normal practice of calibration and preventative maintenance. Depending on the client’s needs these can range from monthly or quarterly inspections. The SSFM-100 has an exceptionally long sensor life and can be extended by doing preventative maintenance and insuring the SSFM-100 sensor intake areas are cleaned and not obstructed. Calibration for the system is straightforward, with no need for complicated cables and connections. Only a basic understanding of calibration practices, calibration gases and our custom accessories are needed. Simply put in the password and follow the screen prompts. The watchdog feature will alert the user/maintenance staff of any system errors including when the system has detected inaccurate measurements or calibration errors both locally thru the maintenance LED and remotely on the Supervisory Platform.A mine in the Greater Sudbury area of Canada came to Becker Varis looking for a solution. It was familiar with the smartsense product and considered it could help in reducing the amount of time needed to wait before re-entering areas after blasting.  Standard procedure at the mine had workers waiting a minimum of 45 minutes to re-enter although most calculations showed that it should only take 10 to 15 minutes for the gases to clear.  There was obvious potential for reduced downtime and improved productivity but without the proper information available nothing could be done but wait.  That is where smartsense came in!  Becker Varis also reports that another point that arose during discussions with the mine “was the fact that the traditional wired gas monitoring systems currently available are not always practical.  The combination of our smartcom leaky feeder communication product and the smartsense monitors provides a unique advantage for our customers as we can use this backbone to transfer all the gas monitor data.”After determining the requirements and details, Becker Varis set out to design a portable gas monitor solution with wireless remote data retrieval.  Using the existing smartsense SSFM-100 housed in a rugged enclosure Becker Varis was able to develop a light-weight, battery powered, portable remote gas monitor that sends its data real-time over the mine’s existing smartcom leaky feeder system.  The portable gas monitor boasts a minimum battery life of seven days and all the standard features of the SSFM-100 fixed gas monitor such as the unique 360° Alarm, auto adjustable backlight LCD screen and up to four different gases to monitor.  The data is collected by the Master unit which includes an external user display screen, strobe light alarm and PLC.  The external screen displays the level of each gas that is being monitored and confirms proper communications with the remote unit.  The Master is constantly polling the remote gas monitor for its data and if any of the gases exceed the preconfigured alarm set points, the Master’s external screen will show an alarm state and the alarm strobe light will also be activated.  If for whatever reason communications are cutoff between the remote gas monitor and the Master it will display a communications failure alarm on its external screen which is important user information.  All this data including alarm history and calibration records can be retrieved by the mine’s existing SCADA system from the onboard PLC making this solution easy to implement and monitor.last_img read more

Mens EHF EURO 2016 in numbers Spanish defensive Austria attack Lazarovs series

← Previous Story Women’s EHF CL: Buducnost, Larvik and Gyor still on 100% Next Story → Allison Pineau about transfer to Krim: Money wasn’t motivation The Men’s EHF EURO 2016 Qualification week in October – November, was the last chance that handball fans across Europe see their national teams before the start of the preparation for the World Championship 2015 in Qatar. Here are some numbers which put another light on the week behind us…23 goals have scored Macedonian star Kiril Lazarov in the two openning matches of the EHF EURO 2016 Qualification against Switzerland and Czech Republic. That is 42.5% of all Macedonian goals on these matches.8 goals advantage had Czech Republic against Macedonia (19:11) in 32nd minute of the match in Zlin, but that wasn’t enough for a victory – 27:27.5.000 fans supported Bosnian team in Tuzla against Denmark, but that wasn’t enough for a triumph – 23:25.43 goals received Serbia and Spain, which got the title of „ the best defense“ at the start of EHF EHF EURO 2016 Qualification.74 goals scored France in their two matches against Czech Republic (41) and Switzerland (33). The Olympic and European champions have the best attack ahead of Slovenians – 70.40 goals, only, scored Austria in two matches against Spain (16) and Germany (24). Team of Patrekur Johannesson without Laszlo Silagy had obviously problem to be more effective.4 goals for the first four minutes and 35 seconds has scored Icelandic star Alexander Petersson. Lefthander of Rhein Neckar Lowen forced Montenegrian NT head-coach, Ljubomir Obradovic to take time-out (4:1), after which nothing was the same. Petersson stayed in a shadow until the end of the match…21:20 was the score in the 53rd minute of the match in Rishon between Israel and Serbia. The „Eagles“ had a good finish with series 5:2 and win the match – 26:22. Kiril LazarovMen’s EHF EURO 2016Poland read more

JeanLouis Borloo sattaque aux niches fiscales vertes

first_imgJean-Louis Borloo s’attaque aux niches fiscales vertes France – Le ministère de l’Environnement a proposé un plan qui lui permettrait de réaliser 2 milliards d’euros d’économies en deux ans, en s’attaquant notamment aux niches fiscales vertes. Jean-Louis Borloo assure toutefois que le “verdissement” de la fiscalité française se poursuit.Le ministre chargé du Développement durable entend faire une économie de 2 milliards d’euros d’ici à 2012, et de 10 milliards en 2013, en modifiant plusieurs dispositifs mis en place en faveur du logement et de l’environnement. Les soutiens accordés au photovoltaïque et aux biocarburants se trouvent notamment menacés.Chapeautant l’aide au logement et le soutien à l’écologie, le ministère du Développement durable est celui qui regroupe les dispositifs de réduction d’impôts les plus coûteux. Pour 2009, le manque à gagner est estimé à quelque 15 milliards d’euros.Dans le plan qu’il vient de présenter à Bercy, Jean-Louis Borloo propose de diminuer d’au moins de moitié la réduction d’impôts de 50% actuellement offerte aux particuliers qui s’équipent de panneaux photovoltaïques. Le ministre prévoit également de réduire d’au moins 10% l’ensemble du crédit d’impôts développement durable, tout en réduisant la liste des travaux éligibles.À lire aussiJournée mondiale de l’environnement : Quelques astuces pour un mode de vie plus écolo au bureauLes subventions accordées pour favoriser le développement des biocarburants sont elles-aussi menacées. Le ministre aimerait notamment supprimer la réduction d’impôts existante, mais se trouve confronté à un important lobby.Jean-Louis Borloo propose par ailleurs de verdir certaines niches, notamment en limitant aux travaux écologiques la liste des matériaux de rénovation offrant une TVA réduite à 5,5%. Une mesure à laquelle devrait s’opposer la Commission Européenne, qui interdit la mise en place d’une TVA réduite en fonction de critères environnementaux.Le 12 juillet 2010 à 16:53 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

La sonde Stardust met un terme à sa mission

first_imgLa sonde Stardust met un terme à sa missionLe 24 mars à minuit, la sonde Stardust a mis un terme à sa mission en vidant ses réservoirs. Ceci marque la fin d’une épopée qui avait débuté en février 1999.La sonde Stardust (“poussière d’étoile”) a allumé ses moteurs pour la dernière fois le 24 mars 2011 à minuit, heure française. En dix minutes, elle a vidé ses réservoirs permettant aux ingénieurs de la Nasa de quantifier l’exacte quantité de carburant dont elle disposait encore. Ces informations permettront de créer de futurs modèles au plus près des besoins requis explique infosciences.fr.À lire aussiLes astronomes observent un étrange astéroïde dans le système solaireLancée le 7 février 1999 par la Nasa, cette sonde était destinée à étudier la comète Wild 2 et à collecter des particules interstellaires. Après un voyage de quatre milliards de kilomètres, Stardust est revenue dans les environs de la Terre le 15 janvier 2006. Elle rapportait à son bord les tous premiers échantillons de poussières interstellaires et cométaires captés sur Wild 2 le 2 janvier 2004.Cette mission de très grande envergure aura coûté, hors lancement 165,4 millions de dollars, selon techno-sciences.net. Stardust détient également le record de vitesse de rentrée atmosphérique pour un objet fabriqué par l’homme. Il s’est en effet déplacé à 46 440 km/h à 125 km d’altitude.Le 25 mars 2011 à 15:54 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Siemens rappelle des tests de grossesse défectueux

first_imgSiemens rappelle des tests de grossesse défectueuxLa division santé du groupe Siemens a décidé de rappeler des lots de certains tests de grossesse rapide hCG. Des réclamations de clients indiquent qu’ils pourraient donner des résultats faux ou tangeants. Ce n’est pas dans les pharmacies que sont commercialisés ces tests de grossesse. Ils sont utilisés par les laboratoires et hôpitaux afin de savoir si une patiente est enceinte ou non avant de lui administrer certains traitements, a précisé un porte-parole de Siemens. La division santé du groupe allemand vient en effet tout juste de procéder au rappel de 15 lots de tests de grossesse rapides hCG.  À lire aussiToxoplasmose : symptômes, traitement, grossesse, quels sont les risques ?”Nous avons demandé à nos clients de ne plus utiliser ces tests, de les détruire ou nous les renvoyer, car ils ne sont pas 100% fiables”, a indiqué le porte-parole cité par l’AFP. Cette annonce fait suite à des réclamations de clients qui ont observé des résultats faux ou tangeants. Certains tests se sont notamment montrés positifs ou incertains alors que les femmes n’étaient pas enceintes. Au total, une centaine de clients à travers le monde sont concernés, a ajouté Siemens.  Si le groupe ignore la raison de ces erreurs, il a annoncé dans un courrier repris par l’Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des produits de santé (Afssaps) qu’il effectuait une “investigation pour déterminer l’origine de ces déviations et mettre en place des actions correctives”. En attendant, il recommande aux laboratoires et hôpitaux “d’avoir recours aux méthodes alternatives de dosage”.Le 30 décembre 2011 à 17:53 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Houston City Council Members Heed Mayors Warning In Budget Amendments

first_imgWhen Mayor Sylvester Turner presented a summary of his budget last month, he made sure to emphasize that he did the best he could to close the city’s $160 million deficit.“I hope that the members of city council will resist the urge to tinker too much with the budget,” he said at the time.And it looks like council members listened. Of the fewer than 60 amendments that have been submitted, none ask for additional spending. They either request reallocation of funds or for even more cuts.“It seems as if the mayor has been very effective at going to council and saying, ‘I’ve been through the budget; I’ve scrubbed it, these are the best proposals I can have,’” Bob Stein, a political scientist at Rice University, said. “And most of the council is going along with him.”And, he said, it highlights how few options there are if the city wants to balance the budget.District I Council member Robert Gallegos submitted one amendment, which would expand a sidewalk repair program.He said he is with the mayor on avoiding any new expenses.“He made it perfectly clear that any amendments that we do submit, that it shouldn’t be of any cost to the city and my amendment would not be a cost to the city,” Gallegos said. “The homeowner would still have to be responsible for paying.”At least four council members didn’t submit any amendments.Staff members of some of them said they were satisfied with the mayor’s approach.A spokeswoman with the mayor’s office said the amendments are only drafts at this time and council members will decide which of them they want to formally put on the table on May 25, when they are scheduled to consider the budget. Editor’s note: This story has been updated to include a comment from the mayor’s office.  To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share Listen 00:00 /01:22 Xlast_img read more

Were Getting More Firefly In Book Form

first_imgLet us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Ever since Firefly became a leaf on the wind, there’s been something missing from our lives. It’s been 15 years since Joss Whedon’s sci-fi western was cancelled for the crime of, well, being a good TV show on Fox at the turn of the millennium. If you don’t remember how ridiculous things got back the, Fox had a reputation for airing creative, experimental, critically acclaimed shows, and then cancelling them after one season. Firefly was one of them. It was an unapologetic cowboy western tale set in space. It followed a crew of outlaws, led by a disillusioned captain who had fought in a doomed rebellion. It had an engrossing story with tons of potential, hard-hitting action, and the snarky wit you expect from a Whedon production. After it was cancelled, Whedon made Serenity which gave the story some closure. Unfortunately, it didn’t perform at the box office, and that, we thought, was the end of Firefly.Now, we’re getting new adventures from the crew of the Serenity. Entertainment Weekly reports that Titan Books is putting out a series of new canonical adventures set in the Firefly universe. Whedon will serve as consulting editor for the new book series, which will debut this fall with Firefly: Big Damn Hero by Nancy Holder. EW reported details of the first three books and they all sound exactly like classic Firefly. Big Damn Hero has Captain Mal being captured by bitter veteran Browncoats, the name of the rebel group Mal was a part of in the failed revolution. The second book is called Firefly: The Magnificent Nine, and will follow the crew to a desert moon after Jayne gets a message from an ex. That one releases in March of 2019. The third book, coming out a year after the first one, is called Firefly: Generations. In that one the crew will find one of the Ancient Ark ships that allowed humans to colonize the ‘Verse, but River has a bad feeling about it. Typically, you want to listen to River’s bad feelings.These aren’t the first new Firefly stories to come out since Serenity. Comics, as they always do, came to fans’ rescue. Dark Horse Comics, published multiple miniseries and one-shots set in the ‘Verse. From the sounds of things though, these novels are going to be a lot more expansive. A second season will likely never happen at this point, as all the actors have gone on to do other things. This book series sounds like the closest we’ll get to another season. Hey, I’m not going to complain about new Firefly, no matter what form it comes in. Those three books sound like they’d make great episodes, and I can’t wait to devour them. I only wonder when they’re going to take place. If it’s before Serenity, then we’d get to see the whole crew together again. If it’s after… I mean, I want to see where the story goes after the events of the movie, but… I don’t know if I can handle a Firefly without Wash.Whether he’s there or not, we can all dive back into the world of Firefly when the first book releases this October. I guess we’ll just have to sing the theme song to ourselves before reading the first page. Stay on targetcenter_img The Firefly 2 is a God Among VapesGotham Is More Fun When the Villains Team Up last_img read more

The world mourns Orlando New details emerge from the shooting Hamilton cleans

first_img Advertisement Hamilton rakes in Tonys and pays tribute to  Orlando victims. (New York Mag)#TonyAwards:’Hamilton’ Cast Introduces James Corden https://t.co/uvZKLVh3Ft https://t.co/K0ANamQSYv— Hollywood Reporter (@THR) June 13, 2016 New details have emerged regarding the Orlando shooter. (Independent) FBI continues to investigate the depth of his connections to ISIS. TonyAwards: ‘Hamilton’ Cast Performs “History Has Its Eyes on You” and “Yorktown” https://t.co/uvZKLVh3Ft https://t.co/cbyb2gBEVg— Hollywood Reporter (@THR) June 13, 2016 Police: Orlando gunman was “cool and calm” during hostage standoff https://t.co/378M5r6eU4— Washington Post (@washingtonpost) June 13, 2016center_img Orlando shooter investigated for false claim of ties to Boston Marathon bombers https://t.co/KIj6UoVU0D— The Guardian (@guardian) June 13, 2016 More shocking footage of Russian hooligans beating up England fans. Disgraceful scenes. #ENG #RUS #EURO2016 pic.twitter.com/5vSwjP99u8— Football__Tweet (@Football__Tweet) June 12, 2016 “Congrats on your new acquisition!” Microsoft buys LinkedIn for $26.2 billion. (Tech Crunch)LinkedIn CEO: Here’s why I sold the company to Microsoft https://t.co/GYg3CUwMUG— TIME.com (@TIME) June 13, 2016Hooliganism mars Euro 2016. (Sky News) The ugly underside of football fandom.Dozens of injured England fans. Russian “ultra” hooligans rampaging through old town #Euro2016 pic.twitter.com/YSXhMwBRix— David Brown (@DavidhBrown) June 11, 2016last_img read more

VIDEO Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging

first_img Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:21Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:21 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Videos | Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Conference Coverage View all 396 items RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Women’s Health View all 62 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Recent Videos View all 606 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Information Technology View all 220 items Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items last_img read more